2017-18 Catalog

Wildlife, Sustainability and Ecosystem Sciences

Courses

WSES 1100. Transitioning to University Studies in the Natural Resource Sciences. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, aid in development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective, and introduce students to the field of wildlife, sustainability, and ecosystem sciences. Prerequisites: Major in WSES or approval of the instructor.

WSES 1119. Natural Resource Competition I. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides an introduction to various natural resource-based competitive events. Competition rules, conduct, and etiquette are discussed. The students are introduced to basic facts regarding their chosen field of study. Prerequisites: Approval of the instructor.

WSES 1301. Society, Natural Resources, and the Environment. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides a broad overview of the role of the environment and natural resources in human society, with particular emphasis on Texas and the United States. A history of the environmental movement is presented. Students study the importance of natural resources in providing basic human necessities, and how these resources are managed. Various careers in environmental science, natural resource management, and wildlife conservation are also discussed.

WSES 1305. Fundamentals of Crop Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Classification and distribution of farm crops; importance of food cultivars and good seed; crop improvement; preparation of seedbed, commercial fertilizers, manures, and lime; seeding practices; crop tillage; harvesting; meadow and pasture management; weeds; crop rotation; diseases and insect enemies. Lab fee $5.

WSES 1307. Concepts and Controversies in Food Studies. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Society has begun to take steps to know more about their food. This course will introduce students to the principles of Food Studies and will explore the role food narratives and exposés play in the consumer’s perception of the current food supply. It will provide a foundation for understanding the connections among food production, ecology, ethics, cuisine, nutrition and health within the framework of sustainability.

WSES 1315. Food Preparation and Meal Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Study of food, food composition, and scientific principles involved in food preparation. Lab fee: $25.

WSES 1322. Nutrition and Diet Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

(TCCNS = HECO 1322 or BIOL 1322) A study of the essential nutrients, including nutrient functions, food sources, deficiency symptoms, and toxicity symptoms; the nutritional requirements of individuals throughout the life cycle; the effects of nutrition on health and fitness; nutrition fads and controversies; and evaluation of personal eating habits. Prerequisite Course(s): One semester of chemistry is recommended.

WSES 2112. Soil Morphology. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Soil morphology, characterizations of soil, and judging of soils for various uses by field-based assessment. Lab fee: $25.

WSES 2119. Natural Resource Competition II. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Intended for students with basic understanding of the conduct of their chosen natural resource event, this course provides more advanced study of the topic. Students expand upon the introductory material discussed in Natural Resource Competition I to include a wider array of natural resource science related facts and concepts. Prerequisites: WSES 1119 or approval of the instructor.

WSES 2301. General Entomology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Principal orders of insects; the relation of anatomy and physiology of insects to control methods; insecticides and their uses; development, habits, and economic importance of more common insects with control methods for the injurious species. Lab fee: $4.

WSES 2302. Sustainability. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Sustainability is often defined as the intersection among ecological, economic, and social factors. Sustainability is also used to describe systems that are resilient and, thus, are able to recover following a disturbance. In the almost 30 years since this term became popular, “sustainable” has been used to describe various activities: sustainable development, sustainable agriculture, sustainable fisheries, sustainable energy use, sustainable transportation systems, and sustainable economic growth. Indicators of sustainability have been developed to analyze the sustainability of everything from wildlife management practices to cities. This course will explore the varied perspectives of sustainability and analyze factors that contribute to or decrease system sustainability. It will also investigate the social, economic, and environmental barriers to achieving sustainable systems and options for overcoming these barriers.

WSES 2309. Biotechnology and Sustainability. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Beginning with background information on basic biological molecules and processes, the course will provide students with an overview of agricultural, medical, pharmaceutical, and forensic applications of biotechnology, both historical and modern. Fundamental technical processes used to manipulate living organisms and biomolecules will be discussed. The development of biotechnology will be explored using case studies, and the ethical, social, regulatory, ecological, economic, and safety ramifications of new technologies will be compared and contrasted with conventional methods of biomanipulation when possible.

WSES 2322. Principles of Wildlife Conservation and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the fundamental principles of wildlife conservation and management, stressing the application of ecological principles to achieve wildlife management objectives. Topics will include conservation, management, and restoration of wildlife habitats; wildlife population assessment and management; human dimensions and human-wildlife interactions; management of wildlife in agricultural, range, and forested ecosystems; and wildlife policy at the local, state, national, and international level. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MATH 1316, or MATH 2412, and WSES 2405, or BIOL 4401; or approval of the instructor.

WSES 2375. Soil as the Basis for Society. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The underpinnings of the scientific principles of soils, how people have harmed them, and why everyone should be concerned with how we treat them. This course may not be used to fulfill the degree requirements for wildlife or ecosystem sciences.

WSES 2405. Ecology for Natural Resource Managers. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A study of the interactions of plants, animals, and the environment and how these interactions respond to human influence. Emphasis will be placed on terrestrial ecosystems (rangelands, grasslands, deserts, wetlands, and forests), and specific interactions among species which can be manipulated to achieve management outcomes. The laboratory will have a significant outdoor field component. Credit will not be awarded for both WSES 2405 and WSES 3103. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1406 and either BIOL 1407 or GEOL 1407, or approval of the instructor.

WSES 2451. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This is a cross-listed course with GEOG 2451 Intro to GIS. Basic concepts of design, planning and implementation of geographic information systems. Students will learn how to create, manipulate, project, and interpret geographic information. Students are encouraged to take GEOG 1451: Pre-GIS before this course. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 2470. Introduction to Turfgrass Science. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An introduction to turfgrass history, benefits, and use. Growth and development of various turfgrass species and their culture, including pest and disease management. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 3101. Soil Science Laboratory. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Basic laboratory techniques used to analyze soil chemical, physical, and biological properties. Hands on examples will demonstrate core soil science principles. Credit will not be awarded for both WSES 3401 and WSES 3101/3301. Prerequisites: WSES 3301 (or concurrent enrollment); and CHEM 1411.

WSES 3103. Ecological Field Methods Laboratory. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Field methodologies used in the investigation of ecological systems including terrestrial plant, terrestrial animal, and aquatic systems. For students who have completed an introductory ecology or environmental biology course with no laboratory component. Credit will not be offered for both WSES 3103 and WSES 2405. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in an approved 1000- or 2000-level ecology or environmental biology course; and a grade of C or better in BIOL 1406; and a grade of C or better in either BIOL 1407 or GEOL 1407; or approval of the department head.

WSES 3119. Natural Resource Competition III. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a more advanced treatment of the student’s chosen natural resource event. It is intended for students with experience in the competition, having participated in at least one competitive event. Prerequisite: WSES 2119 and approval of the instructor.

WSES 3301. Soil Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Basic principles of soil science, including physical, biological, and chemical properties. Discussion will include soils applications in wildland, cropland, and developed environments. This course does not include a laboratory section. Credit will not be awarded for both WSES 3401 and WSES 3101/3301. Prerequisite: CHEM 1411.

WSES 3302. Soils, Land Use, and The Environment. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will examine the interactions among soil physical, chemical, and biological process affecting soil, water, and environmental quality. These interactions will be addressed in relation to land use management practices such as erosion control, soil conservation, soil reclamation, riparian buffers, bioswales, and artificial wetlands. Throughout the course, land use planning tools, including WebSoil Survey and GIS will be used. Prerequisite: WSES 3401, or WSES 2375 and consent of the instructor.

WSES 3303. Veterinary Entomology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Classification, biology, and control of arthropods associated with livestock and wildlife. Identification will be emphasized in the laboratory. Prerequisites: AGRI 1419 or approval of instructor. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 3304. Food Processing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A study of the world food supply, trends and traditions in diet and food sanitation, safety, security, and biotechnology, and impact of processing on diet quality. Lab fee: $25.

WSES 3305. GIS for Natural Resource Scientists. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An introductory course on the use of geographic information systems (GIS) in natural resource management. Laboratory exercises will apply knowledge learned in lectures to solve real world problems in natural resource management using GIS software. Lab fee $25.

WSES 3307. Systems Thinking. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course focuses on the examination and analysis of complex systems, particularly in the environmental, natural resources, and sustainability fields. Major topics will include system structure, system behavior, feedback loops, stock and flow models, non-linear and emergent properties, self-organization, and the application of systems thinking to problem-solving. A significant component of the course will be development and analysis of computer models of complex systems. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1314 or equivalent, or approval of the instructor. Lab fee: 2.

WSES 3309. Aquaponics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Students will examine the pros and cons of various aquaponics methods like raft, nutrient film, vertical towers, and media filled beds and their applications for growing fish and plants sustainably for a family/community or for profit. Students will construct a backyard aquaponics system, establish/harvest plants, and prepare a meal in laboratory. Topics covered are plant and fish choices and recommendations; planting/growing techniques; fish biology, stocking rates, and feeds; plant/fish care and health; water quality; system design, filtration and plumbing components; daily operation; greenhouse management/seasonal adjustments; system start up; food preparation; economics and business considerations.

WSES 3310. Wildlife Management Techniques. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Field and laboratory techniques used in wildlife management and research. Determining age and food habits, population analysis, habitat analysis, and introduction to research. Prerequisites: Grades of C or better in WSES 2322 and MATH 1316, or MATH 2412, or approval of instructor. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by student.

WSES 3311. Wildlife Diseases. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Basic mechanisms of disease as they occur in wildlife populations; interplay of environmental conditions, individual physiological requirements, and disease agents of various wildlife species. Epidemiology and management of infectious and non-infectious diseases. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in WSES 2322 or approval of instructor.

WSES 3313. Plant Diversity and Conservation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The course focuses on patterns and distribution of plant diversity and threats to plant diversity. The focus will be on plant communities found in a variety of range, forests, and other systems. Strategies and approaches used in plant conservation will be discussed. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in WSES 2405, or BIOL 4401, and junior classification; or approval of the instructor.

WSES 3314. Honey Production and Pollinator Ecology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course is designed for students interested in honey bee production. Topics discussed will include, honey bee biology, pollination ecology, honey bee hive management, disease and arthropod pest management, and the harvesting and marketing of honey, pollen, wax, and other honey bee products. Students will work with live bee colonies and they must provide their own vial and hive tools.

WSES 3319. Composting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The art and science of composting of agricultural, municipal, foodservice and household wastes to include composting techniques, waste products and feedstocks, aerobic vs. anaerobic processes, evaluation of composted products and their beneficial uses. Biological processes used to decompose organic materials will be studied. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

WSES 3320. Watershed Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Management and planning of range or forest land watersheds for maintenance or improvement of water and soil resources. Effects of vegetation and land management practices on water quality and quantity, erosion, and sedimentation. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in WSES 2405, or BIOL 4401.

WSES 3321. Life Cycle Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Explores in depth the contribution that diet and nutrition make to support growth and the development process throughout the life cycle. Examines the distinct set of nutritional priorities for each stage of the life cycle with a focus on health promotion and disease prevention as underlying lifetime goals. Prerequisite: WSES 1322 or HECO 1322.

WSES 3323. Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will examine the several major ethical issues facing agriculture and natural resources sciences in our current society. Readings, discussions and lectures will focus on the scientific, capitalistic, and philosophical motivation in common ethical issues. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to construct and dissect ethical arguments and hopefully become more aware of the ethical dilemmas we all face each day.

WSES 3325. Advanced Meal Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Designed to apply the fundamentals of nutrition and food preparation in all types of meal service. Special emphasis is on time and money management. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 3340. Fisheries Conservation and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course addresses the fundamentals of fisheries management. Students will learn basic principles of fisheries management, including population estimation and management, harvest management, habitat management, applicable state and federal laws, invasive species management, and human dimensions. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MATH 1316, or MATH 2412, and either WSES 2405 or BIOL 4401; or approval of the instructor.

WSES 3375. Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles and philosophies associated with the development, management, and use of natural resources are studied in the relationship to the ecological and social implications inherent in management alternatives involving the natural environmental and the use of renewable natural resources. Prerequisite: junior classification.

WSES 3380. Integrated Pest Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to the basic tenets of integrated pest management emphasizing the ecologically sound use of chemical, biological, cultural, and physical control tactics in managing pests. Prerequisites: WSES 2301 and Junior or Senior classification, or approval of instructor of record.

WSES 3385. Fish and Wildlife Laws and Administration. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A review and analysis of state and federal laws and international treaties and conventions affecting fish and wildlife; their application and administration. The organizational structure of state, federal and international agencies; their objectives, policies and practices. Prerequisite: AGRI 2330, or WSES 2322 and junior classification.

WSES 3386. Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Today’s natural resource scientist must interact with diverse publics and stakeholders to achieve conservation goals. Few professionals receive training to navigate the murky waters of human dimensions of natural resources management. This course will give students an understanding of ways in which elements of human psychology and society shape our perceptions and management of wildlife and fisheries resources, and how to interact with these stakeholders to achieve ecologically-sound management and conservation. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in WSES 2322.

WSES 3401. Soils. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours). [WI]

Designed to acquaint the student with the field of soil science. Basic principles of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the soil and their general applications. Credit will not be awarded for both WSES 3401 and WSES 3101/3301. Prerequisites: CHEM 1411 and junior classification. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 3406. Wildland Plant Identification and Ecology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Identification and classification of wildland plants in the United States, with emphasis on distribution, ecology, and economic value of species found in rangeland, forest, grassland, desert, and wetland systems in Texas. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1406, BIOL 1407, and either WSES 2405, or BIOL 4401.

WSES 3408. Dendrology and Woody Plant Identification. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

The study of woody plants, including trees, shrubs, and vines, with an emphasis on species common to north central Texas. Morphological, ecological and phenological traits will be used in field identification. The distribution, habitat, ecology, and importance of these species to wildlife and people will be explored, including community dynamics and the effects of disturbance and succession. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in both BIOL 1406 and BIOL 1407, or approval of department head.

WSES 3412. Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Soil development, classification, and mapping. Laboratory work will consist of field study of the morphological features of the soil profile and the mapping of designated areas using standardized methods. Prerequisite: WSES 3401. Lab fee $25.

WSES 3415. Weed Management. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

General principles in the development of weed prevention and management programs. Common weed ecology and life cycles, land management factors, herbicide selection and performance, and cultural control strategies. Laboratory includes weed identification and herbicide application methods. Prerequisite: WSES 1305 Lab fee $2.

WSES 4084. Internship in the Natural Resource Sciences. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-6 Hours).

Formally arranged and approved on-the-job training with a cooperating sponsor in government of private sector of the natural resources or environmental field. A minimum of 40 hours of training is required for each hour of academic credit. A maximum of six hours of credit may be earned. Oral and written reports of the experience are required. Prerequisite: advanced standing and approval of the instructor. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 4086. Problems in Natural Resource Sciences. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-6 Hours).

Individualized study of current topics in wildlife, natural resources, environmental science, or related discipline. Specific content and credit depend upon student’s interests, needs, and depth of study. May be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite: approval of instructor.

WSES 4088. Undergraduate Research in the Natural Resource Sciences. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-6 Hours).

Fundamental research methods will be addressed through a faculty-directed project. Participation in an abbreviated lecture series may be required. Project components may include a literature review, data collection and analysis, testing, planning, project design, and/or computer modeling. the student may be required to prepare a final report and produce a presentation. Prerequisites: Approval of the instructor.

WSES 4090. Special Topics in the Natural Resource Sciences. 6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0-6 Hours, Lab: 0-6 Hours).

Selected topics in wildlife, natural resources, environmental science, or related discipline. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: approval of instructor.

WSES 4119. Natural Resource Competition IV. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is intended for highly advanced students who have developed significant experience and competencies in their respective natural resource competition. Students will be expected to take a leadership role on the Tarleton State University Quiz Bowl Team and demonstrate significant ability during practice and competitive events. Prerequisite: WSES 3119 and approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: WSES 3119 and approval of the instructor.

WSES 4185. Seminar in the Natural Resource Sciences. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

A review of current issues and developments in natural resources or environmental sciences. Discussion of professional opportunities and responsibilities. Students will complete individual investigation and oral and written reports using scientific literature. Prerequisites: senior classification with a major in Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences; or approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: Senior classification with a major in Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences; or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4187. Senior Capstone Seminar. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This one-hour seminar is designed to provide students with skills at synthesizing and presenting the results of lower-division work, specifically applied learning experiences such as internships, undergraduate research, and study abroad. Course will include a writing and public speaking component. Prerequisites: Successful completion of WSES 4084, WSES 4088, WSES 4340, or WSES 4342, or approval of the Department Head.

WSES 4212. Soil Ecology. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Soil ecosystems are central to the decomposition of organic matter and soil nutrient cycling. In addition, soil organisms are responsible for soil reclamation processes including the degradation of pesticides, hydrocarbons, pathogens, and other soil contaminants. This course will include characterizations of organisms in the soil food web, analyses of interrelationships among soil organisms, and assessments of interactions between soil organisms and their environmental conditions. Prerequisite: WSES 3401, and either WSES 2405 or BIOL 4401, or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4213. Soil Physical Properties. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Soil physical characteristics and their relationship to soil management; emphasis placed on methods of measuring soil and soil conservation. Topics covered include soil phases, soil water properties, particle size, clay and clay mineralogy, and environmental impacts. Prerequisite: WSES 3401.

WSES 4301. Population Dynamics, Modeling, and Analysis. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An introduction to population biology, including models of simple population growth, competition, and predator-prey interactions; demographic rates; and life tables. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in WSES 2322 and grade of C or better in MATH 1316, or MATH 2412; or approval of instructor.

WSES 4302. Habitat Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Application of ecological principles to the management of native plant communities. Particular focus will be on plant ecology and physiology and their role in the conservation and management of wildlife habitat. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in WSES 2405, or BIOL 4401, and grade of C or better in WSES 2322, or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4303. Ecological Restoration of Plant Communities. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The class is an introduction to landscape- scale, process-oriented approaches to ecological restoration. Topics include enhancing resource capture, techniques in re-vegetation and restoration of historic vegetation. Prescribed fire and grazing as restoration and management techniques for range and forest systems will also be addressed. Prerequisites: BIOL 3415, grade of C or better in either WSES 2405, or BIOL 4401, and junior classification, or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4304. Population Genetics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An exploration of the principles of population genetics. Lecture will be a discussion of factors affecting the dynamics of allelic frequencies and the population-level consequences of manipulating these factors. Lecture topics will include the effects of selection, mutation, population size and genetic drift, neutral theory, population structure, inbreeding, and linkage disequilibrium. A significant portion of the class will be dedicated to working on problem sets to provide an empirical connection to population genetic theories. Prerequisite: BIOL 3303, BIOL 3403, or AGRI 3409.

WSES 4305. Urban Wildlife and Fisheries. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course trains students to establish and maintain diverse, self-sustaining urban wildlife and fish populations at levels in harmony with ecological, social, an economic values of the human community and to develop optimal levels of public appreciation and use of urban wildlife an fish resources and associated habitats. Includes discussions on conservation education as a tool for furthering urban wildlife and fisheries appreciation.

WSES 4306. Water Resources Policy and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will present an overview of water policy, laws and regulations related to ecosystem resource management focusing on water quality, water quantity and water as habitat. Major US and Texas environmental laws regarding water will be covered including the respective agencies involved with regulations. Case studies will facilitate discussion of science-policy interactions with resource management in the implementation of these laws and regulations. Credit for SOCI 4306, WSES 4306, and SOCI 5306 will not be awarded.

WSES 4307. Energy, Society, and the Environment. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course addresses fundamental principles and concepts of energy including the nature of energy flows and storage, potential and kinetic energy, energy loss and reversible and irreversible processes, as well as the effects of energy exploration, distribution, consumption, and conservation on society and the environment.

WSES 4308. Horticultural Entomology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Identification, nature of injury, life history, and control of common insects and related arthropods attacking turf grasses, landscape plants, shade, fruit, and nut trees, and greenhouse succulents. Management and control strategies utilizing chemical, cultural, and biological control agents.

WSES 4309. Plant-Animal Interactions. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Plant-animal and animal-plant interactions are the basis for many ecosystem functions. This course tailors the study of those interactions to student interests from insects to ungulates, aquatic to terrestrial, managed to natural systems, and individual species to ecosystems. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in WSES 2405 or BIOL 4401 and junior classification, or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4311. Fire Ecology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course will address the ecological role of fire in natural systems, including rangelands, grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, and forests; adaptations of plants and animals to fire; long-term controls on wild fire; use of fire as an ecosystem management tool, with aspects of wildland firefighting; and prescribed burning, including fire behavior, fuels, weather, politics and policy. Students will gain hands-on prescribed burning experiences as circumstances and weather permit. Prerequisites: WSES 2405 or BIOL 4401, or approval of the instructor. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 4315. Medical Nutrition Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the physiological basis and application of medical nutrition therapy using the nutrition care process as related to specific health conditions. Medical terminology, nutrition assessment techniques and case studies are explored. Prerequisite: WSES 1322 or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4316. Pesticides. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of chemical pesticides. Emphasis will be on the chemistry, mode of action, and safe use of insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. Less common pesticides (rodenticides, piscicides, avicides, etc.) will also be reviewed. The use of chemical pesticides as a part of an integrated pest management program will be discussed. Student's successfully completing the course will be prepared to apply for the Texas Department of Agriculture pesticide applicator's license. Prerequisite: CHEM 1411.

WSES 4323. Vegetable Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The study of vegetable production techniques including site selection, nutritional requirements, insects, diseases and varieties. Emphasis will be placed on small scale gardening techniques, crop rotation, and layout and design parameters to maximize production on small land areas. Seasonal variations (spring, summer, fall and winter) that influence crop selection and management practices will be evaluated. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

WSES 4324. Organic Agriculture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Organic agriculture will examine a brief history of the industry development, changes in the structure and industry, USDA NOP rules and regulations, and certification to provide a scope of understanding for the course. The majority of the course will focus on the mechanics of crop and vegetable production in an organic system including seed sources, planting considerations, environment, soil fertility, plant nutrition, soil preparation, weed control methods, insect and disease prevention, rules in applications, harvest issues, and marketing.

WSES 4325. Crop Production and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Current concepts and practices in field crop production with emphasis on the applications of technology. Recognition and discussion of cultural practices, fertilization, irrigation, weed and pest control from economic and environmental perspectives. Review of crop improvement strategies and bio-engineering.

WSES 4326. Big Game Ecology and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Survey of the distributions and life histories of North American big game species. Productivity, food habits, economic significance, and management will be examined. Will include a study of current management strategies employed on deer farms in North America with a focus on the Texas deer industry and impacts on traditional wildlife management. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in WSES 2322 and 8 hours of advanced WSES courses, or approval of the instructor. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student.

WSES 4327. Avian Ecology and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

A study of major wild bird groups, their interactions with their environment, and how these interactions can be manipulated to achieve management objectives. Course emphasis will be on species of conservation significance, including game, nongame, and vulnerable species. Major topics will include population management of migratory and non-migratory birds, habitat management, and wildlife policy consideration unique to bird conservation. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in WSES 2322, junior classification or higher, or approval of the instructor. Lab fee: $20.

WSES 4335. Food and Culture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A study of the food beliefs and practices of the major ethnic and religious groups in the U. S. and the nutritional implications of these food practices, a cultural analysis of American food trends; ethnic issues and dietary changes; and research methods in food habits. Lab fee: $25.

WSES 4340. Natural Resource Field Studies. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A field course in which students capture, measure, and mark animals; collect descriptive measures of vegetation that characterizes wildlife habitat; and record field observations using a journal. This course requires a one-week field trip at student’s expense (in addition to the field experience fee). Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in WSES 2322 or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4341. Study Abroad in Natural Resource Conservation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will be conducted at various sites outside the United States. The goal of this course will be to introduce students to the natural resources of other countries, with a focus on wildlife and ecosystem management and conservation in the context of continued development. We will address issues such as human-wildlife conflicts, the role of wildlife in ecotourism activities, the provision of ecosystem services by wild animals, and the management of wildlife on both public and private lands. Enrollment in this course requires a significant study abroad program fee. May be repeated for credits when topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor.

WSES 4342. Field Study Abroad in Natural Resource Conservation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This is the field component to WSES 4341, where students will engage in hands-on activities geared toward understanding the biology of local wildlife populations and associated management issues. Enrollment in this course requires a significant study abroad program fee. May be repeated for credits when topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. Requires concurrent enrollment in the relevant section of WSES 4341.

WSES 4401. Ethology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

An introductory course in the behavior of animals, with emphasis on the natural selection, ontogeny, and function of behaviors as they relate to feeding, reproduction, predator-avoidance, and other traits. Both proximate (sensory, hormonal, genetic) and ultimate (ecological and evolutionary) mechanisms are addressed. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 1406 and BIOL 1407, and a C or better in either AGRI 1419 or WSES 2322. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 4407. Fermentation and Brewing. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

This course provides a basic understanding of the history of food safety, sanitation, fermentation, fermented foods, beer brewing, wine and cheese making, along with an introduction to industry organization; from commodities production, to processing, distribution, marketing, and sales. The course provides direct hands-on instruction in small-scale brewing. It combines elements of science (chemistry, biology, and physics), economics, food preparation, aesthetics, preferences, and taste. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student. Prerequisites: Senior classification and completion of 8 hours of BIOL and 8 hours of CHEM; or approval of the instructor. Must be 21 years of age or older on the first class day to enroll in this course.

WSES 4408. Sustainable Food Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

This course will survey issues surrounding food production and examine the environmental and social impact of current food production systems. Specific emphasis will be placed on emerging trends to increase the sustainability of food production, distribution, and consumption. This course includes a laboratory field component and will require some field work outside normal class times. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 4410. Genomics. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

An exploration of practical applications for high throughput DNA sequencing technology. Hands-on research projects will provide experience in proper sample collection and preparation, automated robotic DNA library preparation, DNA barcoding, quality control metrics, instrument loading and run initiation, and an overview of data processing for a single instrument run generating hundreds of millions of DNA sequences. Prerequisite: BIOL 3303 or AGRI 3409 Lab fee: $2.

WSES 4450. Soil Nutrient Cycling. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Provides an understanding of plant nutrition, soil nutrient cycling, and nutrient management. Includes discussion of soil biological, physical, and chemical properties and interactions with nutrient availability to crops and nutrient fate in the environment. Students will identify plant nutrition/soil fertility problems and recommend corrective action, identify soil and nutrient management. Prerequisite: WSES 3401. Lab fee: $25.

WSES 4470. Turfgrass Management & Irrigation. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0-3 Hours, Lab: 0-2 Hours).

Characteristics and management of turfgrasses used for home lawns, recreational areas and sports fields. Turfgrass irrigation system design. Department recommends WSES 2470 to be taken prior to WSES 4470. Prerequisites: HORT 1301, WSES 1305, or instructor approval. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 5084. Professional Practice. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-6 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This supervised professional practice will involve the student in practical activities in the agricultural or natural resource sciences. The experience is tailored to the to the student's interests, and academic and career goals. Experience may include teaching, independent research, internship, or other applied learning experience. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

WSES 5085. Seminar. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A graduate seminar with content varying according to the needs and experiences of students and the instructor of record. May be repeated as content varies. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

WSES 5086. Problems in Natural Resource Sciences. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-6 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Advanced studies in wildlife, sustainability, ecosystem sciences, and the natural resources. Problems assigned according to experience, interest, and needs of the individual student. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

WSES 5087. Research. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-6 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Graduate students conduct original research on a variety of topics in the natural resource sciences toward a graduate thesis. Designed for students who will be conducting field research away from the Stephenville campus. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

WSES 5088. Thesis. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-6 Hours, Lab: 1-6 Hours).

Scheduled when the student is ready to begin the thesis. No credit until the thesis is completed. Prerequisites: Approved research methodology course and approval of instructor of record.

WSES 5090. Special Topics in the Natural Resource Sciences. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Selected topics in wildlife, sustainability, ecosystem science, or the natural resources as needed and dependent upon department, faculty, and student interests. May be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor.

WSES 5301. Principles of Research in the Natural Resource Sciences. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a thorough treatment of the philosophy of science as it applies to the ecological, environmental, and natural resource sciences. Starting from the historical foundations of science, students will become familiar with the logical underpinnings of ecological research, including epistemology, the nature of theory, hypothesis testing, and the logic of study design. This course will provide students with a logical understanding of the scientific process, prior to enrollment in more quantitative treatments of study design and data analysis. Students will be required to prepare a complete research proposal in the course. Prerequisite: graduate classification.

WSES 5302. Natural Resource Ecology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Expanding upon a firm understanding of basic ecology, this course explores the relationship of ecological principles to natural resource, wildlife, and range conservation and management. Topics include ecology’s historical context, evolution, the niche, intraspecific and interspecific competition, succession, predator-prey dynamics, and spatial ecology. Emphasis will be placed on the application of these principles to natural resource issues. The course will include a review of classical and contemporary ecological literature. Prerequisites: graduate classification and BIOL 4401 (or equivalent) or approval of the instructor.

WSES 5303. Graduate Field Studies in Ecology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students explore various facets of ecology during extended field trips to various locations in Texas and the other United States. Topics may vary depending upon location. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. This course requires an extended field trip at the student’s expense (in addition to the field experience fee). Prerequisite: graduate classification, and enrollment by permit only and with approval of the instructor.

WSES 5304. Wildlife-Habitat Relationships. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An advanced study of habitat and wildlife-habitat interactions. This is a graduate level class for individuals with a basic understanding of ecological and wildlife management concepts. Involves review and discussion of important articles on this subject. Includes advanced discussion of concepts such as plant succession, niche, carrying capacity, habitat measurements, and habitat management. Students will learn how habitat and succession may be manipulated to best manage wildlife populations; also how browsers and grazers may affect their habitats. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

WSES 5306. Fire Ecology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course will address the ecological role of fire in natural systems, rangelands, including grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, and forests; adaptations of plants and animals to fire; long-term controls on wild fire; use of fire as an ecosystem management tool, with aspects of wildland firefighting; and prescribed burning, including fire behavior, fuels, weather, politics and policy. Students will gain hands-on prescribed burning experiences as circumstances and weather permit. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 5308. Measuring Animal Behavior. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An advanced course in the principles and methods of quantitative studies of behavior, with an emphasis on techniques of observation, recording, and analysis.

WSES 5309. Plant-Animal Interactions. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Plant-animal and animal-plant interactions are the basis for many ecosystem functions. This course tailors the study of those interactions to student interests from insects to ungulates, aquatic to terrestrial, managed to natural systems, and individual species to ecosystems. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.

WSES 5310. Presentation of Scientific Findings. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to teach graduate students in the natural resource sciences and allied fields the principles and practices of presenting the results of scientific research. Course focus will be on preparing and delivering oral research presentations and research posters; and the preparation, submission, and publication of scientific journal articles, technical bulletins, and research reports. Prerequisite: Admission into the Research Track of the MS Program in Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences and a grade of B or better in BIOL 5380, or approval of the Department Head.

WSES 5311. Integrated Pest Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An advanced study of the principles of integrated pest management emphasizing the ecologically sound use of chemical, biological, cultural, and physical control tactics to manage pests. Students will concentrate on one or few commodities, of their choice, and develop a detailed best management plan. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or approval of the instructor.

WSES 5312. Pesticides. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of chemical pesticides. Emphasis will be on the chemistry, mode of action, and safe use of insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. Less common pesticides (rodenticides, piscicides, avicides, etc.) are also reviewed. The use of the products as a part of an integrated pest management program will be discussed. Prerequisites: Graduate classification or approval of the instructor.

WSES 5314. Veterinary Entomology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Advanced studies in the classification, biology, and management of arthropods associated with livestock and wildlife systems. Emphasis will be placed on arthropod vectors of pathogens and their role in the epidemiology and management of disease. Prerequisites: Graduate classification or approval of the instructor.

WSES 5315. Taxonomy of Veterinary Arthropods. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Advance study of the taxonomy and identification of arthropods affecting wildlife and domesticate animals. Students will utilize various collecting techniques and dichotomous keys to obtain and identify arthropods associated with wildlife and domesticated animals.

WSES 5316. Grant Writing and Funding Aquisition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A course in terminology and processes associated with grant writing and the acquisitions of research funds.

WSES 5320. Advanced Topics in Ecosystem Biogeochemistry. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Multidisciplinary analysis of energy and nutrient transfers within terrestrial ecosystems. Examination of processes system interactions between the atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere.

WSES 5331. Professional Communication. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Advanced discussion of techniques for communicating technical information to diverse audiences. Topics covered will include written and oral communication, using numerous formats. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

WSES 5341. Graduate Study Abroad in Natural Resource Conservation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will be conducted at various sites outside the United States. The goal of this course will be to introduce students to the natural resources of other countries, with a focus on wildlife and ecosystem management and conservation in the context of continued development. We will address issues such as human-wildlife conflicts, the role of wildlife in ecotourism activities, the provision of ecosystem services by wild animals, and the management of wildlife on both public and private lands. Enrollment in this course requires a significant study abroad program fee. May be repeated for credits when topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor.

WSES 5342. Graduate Field Study Abroad in Natural Resource Conservation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This is the field component to WSES 5341, where students will engage in hands-on activities geared toward understanding the biology of local wildlife populations and associated management issues. Enrollment in this course requires a significant study abroad program fee. May be repeated for credits when topics vary. Requires concurrent enrollment in the relevant section of WSES 5341. Prerequisite: approval of the instructor.

WSES 5350. Pedology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Topics selected from studies of soil-forming processes, soil-geomorphic relations, mineral weathering, new developments in soil classification, and development of pedologic theory. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated one time for credit.

WSES 5360. Research Methods for Agricultural and Natural Resource Scientists. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 1 Hour).

The application of sampling and experimental designs to laboratory and field research for agricultural sciences. Data collection protocols, statistical analyses, instrumentation, computer applications, data presentation, and technical writing associated with plant and animal research. Students are required to design and complete an independent research project or complete components of a thesis.

WSES 5380. Research Writing for Agricultural and Environmental Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Preparation of writing samples, technical reviews, and/or professional manuscripts related to various topics in agriculture or environmental sciences. Prerequisites: Approved research methodology course and approval of instructor of record. Credit for 2 or more classes of ANSC 5380, AGRI 5380 or ENVS 5380 will not be awarded. Cross-listed with ENVS 5380.

WSES 5405. Ecological Modeling for Natural Resource Management. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

An advanced course in the use of computer simulations to model and analyze ecological systems. Based on a firm foundation of system theory, the course addresses the conceptual design, building, evaluation, and testing of simulation models; and the use of models to answer ecological questions. Prerequisites: graduate classification.

WSES 5410. Genomics. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Technological advancements in DNA sequencing are producing a much more complete picture of how diverse, ubiquitous, and important microbes are in all living systems. This course will provide students with an overview of the roles that microbes play in human health, agricultural production, and ecosystem functionality. A laboratory component will include massively parallel DNA sequencing and microbial community analysis of niche environments utilizing millions of DNA sequence tags. Prerequisite: BIOL 3407 or equivalent. Lab fee: $2.