Psychology and Counseling

The Department of Psychology and Counseling offers the Master of Education degree with a major in counseling and a Master of Science in Counseling Psychology degree with majors in (1) professional counseling and (2) marriage and family therapy.  These degree options are designed to help students improve their competencies in their respective fields by developing new skills and in-depth knowledge, which are requisites for assuming roles of increased responsibility and leadership.

*The following graduate degree programs are being phased-out by the University, and no new admissions will be allowed:  Master of Science in Educational Psychology, and Specialist in School Psychology. 

Basic Procedures

Graduate advisors are designated in each of the major program areas to assist new students and those for whom graduate committees have not been appointed. The graduate committee chair, when appointed, assists the student in developing a degree plan and, along with the committee members, assumes the responsibility for preparing the student for the comprehensive examinations.

To receive full admission to any degree program offered in the Department of Psychology and Counseling, an applicant must meet all standards established by the College of Graduate Studies and all departmental program requirements and be recommended by the graduate advisor, committee chair, or the program admissions committee.

Students who meet the general requirements for conditional admission and are recommended by the department for full admission will be permitted to pursue one of the major areas in the department. Typically, the student admitted conditionally will be required to complete 12 semester hours with a 3.25 GPA.

To remain in good standing, students who have full admission status are expected to maintain a 3.0 GPA. Students whose GPA does not meet the minimum may not enroll for additional work without special permission from the department head.

Consideration for accepting transfer credits will be given only after a student has full admission to graduate study. Credits transferred from an approved institution must meet the guidelines outlined in Limitations on Transfer and Correspondence Courses in General Requirements for the Master's Degree.

Admission Guidelines

  • The student must be admitted to the College of Graduate Studies.
  • The student must meet admission requirements as specified in the Application for Admission to the Graduate Psychology and Counseling Programs.  An application form may be obtained from the department office or website.
  • The student must return the completed application for admission and all documentation according to the following schedule:
    Fall Semester July 1
    Spring Semester November 1
    Summer Semester April 1
  • A training committee consisting of members of the graduate counseling or psychology faculty will convene every semester to review applications and make recommendations for acceptance or rejection of individual applicants. The following factors contribute to the decision of the admissions committee:
    • graduate admission status
    • performance in previous undergraduate and graduate coursework
  • Additional coursework may be required if a student’s undergraduate degree is not in a field that is closely related to counseling or psychology.
  • All students failing to meet full admission requirements will be placed on conditional admission status until the first 12 semester hours are completed.
    • Students must enroll in coursework approved by a graduate advisor and receive a grade point average (GPA) of 3.25 or above on the specified coursework.
    • Students will not be permitted to enroll in additional coursework in counseling (CNSL), counseling psychology (CPSY), or psychology (PSY) beyond the first 12 semester hours if not fully admitted to the program.
    • If denied full admission, students may re-apply for admission after successful remediation. Students are responsible for this remediation following input from the graduate advisor and/or admissions committee.

Admission Review (all majors)

Students’ admission status will be reviewed continuously throughout their course of study regarding their ability to develop competence in counseling, therapy, and/or assessment skills. Should a change in admission status be required, appropriate program procedures will be followed. Consult the student handbook or ask a graduate advisor for details.

Admission to Candidacy (all majors)

  • Admission to candidacy is a requirement for all degree-seeking students. Upon completion of specific core courses, a student must be admitted to candidacy to continue progress on the degree plan.
  • The requirements for candidacy are:
    1. Have a degree plan on file in the Graduate School and Department
    2. Be fully admitted to the Counseling or Counseling Psychology degree program and the Graduate School
    3. Have a 3.0 GPA and not be on academic probation
    4. Show satisfactory progress and acceptable standards of conduct
  • Submit an essay regarding the student’s learning as a result of taking the Sixteen Personality Factor (16PF) questionnaire while enrolled in CPSY 550 or PSY 560
    • The essay must be introspective and utilize 16PF interpretation report information to address the student’s (1) reaction to the experience, (2) identified strengths, and (3) identified areas for growth as they relate to becoming a professional counselor, psychologist, or therapist. A fee must be paid at the time the 16PF is taken to cover the cost of materials and the production of an individualized interpretation report.

Comprehensive Examination

All counseling and counseling psychology, educational psychology, and specialist in school psychology degree candidates must pass a comprehensive examination during the semester in which graduation is anticipated.

Majors in counseling, professional counseling, marriage and family therapy, psychological associate, and school psychology

  • Examination Administration and Application Dates

Examinations will be administered three times per year. Examinees must have filed a degree plan and complete an application to be eligible to take the comprehensive exam according to the schedule that follows.

Test Date Application Deadline
Second Saturday in April March 1
Second Saturday in July June 5
Second Saturday in November October 1

No examination will be administered other than on a regularly scheduled administration date without permission from the graduate advisor, the department head, and the Graduate Dean.

Comprehensive examinations will be composed of objective and essay sections. A student must receive a satisfactory grade on each section in order to successfully complete the comprehensive examination.

  • Examination Procedures

Section One. Each committee member will grade the essay questions that he/she submitted for the exam. The chair of the committee submits two questions, and each committee member submits one question. A committee member may choose to read a student’s response to all four questions.

Each of the exam questions will be graded on a 25 point scale. All four questions must be attempted. To pass this section, a student must receive at least 70 out of the possible 100 points. Points may be subtracted from an essay because of content deficiencies, grammar, or composition errors.

Section Two. This section of the comprehensive examination consists of a computer-graded, 100-question multiple choice examination over the course content of required courses. Each question is worth one point, and the student is expected to attain a score of at least 70 points.

Retake Policy. If an examinee fails either section of the examination, he/she may retake the failed section(s) at the next regular administration date. No one may retake any section of the examination more than two times without authorization from the department head and Graduate Dean.

Majors in experimental psychology

  • Thesis

An original research project will be proposed, conducted, and defended by the student in the form of a written thesis. The thesis will be done under the direction of a graduate faculty member as chair and two other faculty members as the student’s advisory committee. Refer to the Graduate School’s Thesis Manual for details regarding the preparation and submission of a thesis for approval.

  • Examination Procedures

Upon completion of the thesis, a final oral examination is scheduled with the student’s advisory committee. Major emphasis will be directed toward defense of the thesis, although the examination may also include related course work materials.

The oral examination may be attempted once per regular semester or summer. If the oral examination performance is not acceptable on first attempt, the specific area(s) of weakness will be identified to the candidate so that corrective action (additional review or course work) may be taken before the next attempt. No one may retake the oral examination more than two times without authorization from the department head and Graduate Dean.

Degrees:

Master of Education in Counseling

Required Courses
CNSL 552Seminar in School Counseling3
CNSL 591Ethical Foundations of Counseling3
CNSL 595Internship in Counseling I3
CNSL 596Internship in Counseling II3
CPSY 550Foundations of Counseling and Psychology3
CPSY 551Career Counseling and Guidance3
CPSY 553Personality and Counseling Theories and Applications3
CPSY 554Group Procedures for Counselors3
PSY 504Human Development3
PSY 511Cultural, Minority and Gender Issues3
PSY 581Assessment and Evaluation Fund3
CNSL 593Play Therapy3
or CNSL 559 Brief Therapy
CPSY 557Methods and Practices in Counseling and Psychology3
PSY 513Crisis Intervention and Management of Individuals and Families3
Total Hours42

Master of Science in Counseling Psychology

Required Courses
Core Requirements:
PSY 500Behavioral Statistics3
PSY 501Research Methods3
PSY 504Human Development3
PSY 505Practicum I: Field Experience3
PSY 584Practicum II: Field Experience3
CPSY 550Foundations of Counseling and Psychology3
CPSY 553Personality and Counseling Theories and Applications3
CPSY 557Methods and Practices in Counseling and Psychology3
CPSY 558Counseling Perspectives on Psychopathology3
CNSL 591Ethical Foundations of Counseling3
Option A: Licenesed Professional Counselor (Total hours: 48) 1
PSY 511Cultural, Minority and Gender Issues3
PSY 581Assessment and Evaluation Fund3
CPSY 551Career Counseling and Guidance3
CPSY 554Group Procedures for Counselors3
Select two of the following:6
Crisis Intervention and Management of Individuals and Families
Behavior Management and Therapy
Human Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction
Introduction to Family Counseling and Therapy
Substance Abuse
Brief Therapy
Play Therapy
Option B: Marriage and Family (Total hours: 51) 1
CPSY 509Assessment & Treatment in Marital & Family Therapy3
CPSY 510Family Relationships and Development3
CPSY 520Advanced Family Systems Theory3
CPSY 524Human Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction3
CPSY 556Introduction to Family Counseling and Therapy3
PSY 513Crisis Intervention and Management of Individuals and Families3
PSY 587Practicum III: Field Experience3
1

Additional requirements for options (in addition to core requirements).

Counseling Psychology Courses

CPSY 509. Assessment and Treatment in Marital and Family Thearapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Presents evaluative methods and assessment techniques as well as treatment plans and strategies for examining and treating problematic and dysfunctional marital and family systems. Emphasis is placed on case analysis, management and treatment Prerequisites: CPSY 550, CPSY 553, and CPSY 556, or approval of the department head.

CPSY 510. Family Rel And Development. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of family systems in relation to life-cycle changes, cultural issues and influences, gender issues, family functions, and structural changes. Divorce, post-divorce, remarried, single parent and other alternative family systems are examined and various interventions are reviewed. Prerequisites: CPSY 550, CPSY 553, and CPSY 556, or approval of the department head.

CPSY 520. Advanced Family Systems Theory. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A comprehensive examination of systems theory in family studies, with particular focus on family systems and the relationship between the internal functioning of families and the external environment. Includes the study of the concepts of multi-generational transmission, fusion, emotional cutoff, differentiation, family projection and triangulation among others. Prerequisites: CPSY 550, CPSY 553, and CPSY 556, or approval of the department head.

CPSY 524. Hum Sexuality and Sexual Dysf. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A detailed examination of human sexuality, including reproductive physiology, sexual development across the lifespan, sexual behavior, sexual diversity, and the treatment of sexual dysfunction. Includes a focus on the role of sexuality in relationships and in marital and family dynamics. Prerequisites: CPSY 550, CPSY 553, and CPSY 556, or approval of the department head.

CPSY 550. Found of Counseling & Psych. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides an overview of counseling and psychological services commonly found in a variety of settings. Includes individual and group counseling, testing, career planning and placement, referral, and consultation. Examines related theories and concepts with emphasis on counseling skills, as well as historical, ethical, legal, and professional issues. Payment for and completion of the 16PF personality test is required during the course. Taken concurrently with CPSY 553 in the first semester of enrollment.

CPSY 551. Career Counseling and Guidance. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An in-depth study of career counseling and guidance services that focuses on occupational, educational, and personal/social issues for general and special populations. Includes examination of theoretical bases for career counseling and guidance, study of organization and delivery of information through individual and group activities. Covers related ethical concerns. Students will be required to purchase occupational and educational information materials. Prerequisite: CPSY 550 or approval of department head.

CPSY 553. Pers Couns Theories Appl. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Surveys and investigates personality and counseling theories with an emphasis on how theories influence practice. Special emphasis on applications to various populations. Covers related ethical concerns. Includes role plays and other experiential methods. Videotaped counseling sessions are critiqued. Private personal counseling by a community counselor is required during the course. Taken concurrently with CPSY 550 in the first semester of enrollment.

CPSY 554. Group Proc For Counselors. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to group therapy and group procedures with an emphasis on developing group counseling skills to work with children, adolescents, adults, and special populations. Various types of groups, an understanding of group dynamics and development, and related ethical and legal concerns are covered. Participation in supervised group counseling experiences is required. Prerequisites: CPSY 550 and CPSY 553, or approval of department head.

CPSY 556. Intro Family Cnsl And Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An overview of the theoretical concepts and intervention strategies unique to family, systems, and relational therapies. Includes the study of family dynamics, family development, relationships, and the resolution of family concerns. Covers ethical and legal considerations. Prerequisites: CPSY 550 and PSY 553, or approval of department head.

CPSY 557. Meth and Prac in Cnsl and Psy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The course is designed to introduce Counseling and Psychology pre-interns to methodology that goes beyond building basic counseling skills and techniques. The course will also teach students the basics of professional documentation and treatment planning. It will also include legal issues related to counseling and psychological services and introduce basic business practices.

CPSY 558. Cnsl Persp on Psychopathology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An overview of psychopathology that includes the history of abnormal behavior and an in-depth study of the specific diagnostic psychological disorders. Emphasis will be on classification systems currently used in clinical settings and treatment alternatives from a counseling perspective. Covers related ethical concerns. Prerequisites: CPSY 550 or PSY 560, and CPSY 553, or approval of department head.

CPSY 590. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Presentation of advanced study material on a specialized topic of interest to counseling and psychology. Course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. (Course will be offered not more than one semester each year.).

CPSY 594. Substance Abuse. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to addiction counseling. Special attention is given to models of addiction, chemical dependence, process addictions, and co-dependence. An experiential component is included as well. Covers related ethical concerns. Prerequisite: CPSY 550 or PSY 560, and CPSY 553, or approval of department head.

Counseling Courses

CNSL 552. Seminar in Sch Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An in-depth study of a comprehensive school counseling and guidance program. The course will address the theoretical foundation, knowledge, and skills to prepare the student to implement a counseling and guidance program in an educational (K-12) setting. Covers related ethical concerns. Prerequisite: CPSY 550 or approval of department head.

CNSL 559. Brief Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An in-depth examination of brief therapy including history, philosophy, theory, and techniques. Stresses application of learning through experiential methods. Covers related ethical concerns. Prerequisite: CPSY 550 or PSY 560, and CPSY 553, or approval of department head.

CNSL 586. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Open to graduate students in counseling who are independently capable of developing a problem in the area of counseling and guidance. Problems chosen by the student must be approved in advance by the instructor.

CNSL 590. Selected Topics in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of different topics each semester with a focus on contemporary issues in counseling. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

CNSL 591. Ethical Found Of Cnsl. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An exploration of the ethical principles of counselors and related codes of ethics. Covers models for ethical decision making and how to apply to counseling practice.

CNSL 593. Play Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to play therapy with an emphasis on developing counseling skills using play as the means of communication and understanding. Includes background, history, and various play techniques. Covers related ethical concerns. Prerequisites: CPSY 550 or PSY 560, and CPSY 553, or approval of department head.

CNSL 595. Intern In Counseling I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Supervised professional activities in guidance and counseling. Major emphasis is placed on the student's involvement in successful practices at the educational level of interest. Students must have met all academic and professional standards of practice before placement. The field experience will consist of a minimum of 150 clock hours. Liability insurance is required. An application must be submitted by the published due date in the semester prior to field placement and approved by the practicum/internship director. Prerequisites: 3.0 or greater GPA and CPSY 557, or approval of the department head. Field experience fee $75.

CNSL 596. Internship Cnsl II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Continued supervised experience of professional activities in counseling and guidance in the student¿s area of interest. Major emphasis is placed on the integration of theoretical and conceptual principles, as well as professional and personal skill development. Covers related ethical concerns. Prerequisites: CNSL 595 and the application for internship. Field experience fee $50.

Psychology Courses

PSY 500. Behavioral Statistics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Review of descriptive statistics with emphasis on inferential statistics. Includes correlation, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, regression analysis and experimental design. Use of computer software with emphasis on experience with SPSS. Prerequisite: undergraduate statistics recommended.

PSY 501. Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the scientific method of research, types of research and research design. Students are required to review, analyze and interpret research findings in their major field and develop a research project with the assistance of their instructor. This course should be taken after the completion of 12 graduate semester hours. Prerequisites: PSY 500 or equivalent graduate statistics course. Lab fee assessed.

PSY 502. Adv Social Psychology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An in-depth examination of the individual in a social and cultural context.

PSY 503. Theories Of Learning. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Study of major theories of learning, factors which influence the process of learning, and application of these theories and processes to general and special populations. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate School or approval of department head.

PSY 504. Human Development. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A lifespan survey of the development of human beings from conception to death. Topics included will be research and theory into physical, cognitive, social, and personality development in each of the different age groups: prenatal, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.

PSY 505. Practicum I: Field Exp. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Provides supervised experience in mental health, counseling, marriage and family, school, rehabilitation, and other field settings outside the University. The field experience will consist of a minimum of 150 clock hours. Liability insurance is required. An application must be submitted by the published due date in the semester prior to field placement and approved by the practicum/internship director. Prerequisite: 3.0 or greater GPA and CPSY 557, or approval of the department head. Field experience fee $50.

PSY 511. Culture,Minority,Gender Iss. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Study of interaction of social/cultural groups in America, problems of minorities and ethnic groups, problems related to gender and age, problems within family systems and contemporary sources of positive change.

PSY 512. Child Adol Eval Cnsl Tech. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides an overview of advanced statistical techniques to analyze quantitative data resulting from experimental and quasi-experimental research designs. This course is a continuation of PSY 500 and 501 and requires students to demonstrate proficiency in the use of SPSS for data analysis. The course reviews One-Way and Two-Factor ANOVA. Other topics include ANCOVA, MANOVA, MANCOVA, multiple regression, logistic regression, data reduction techniques (factor analysis and principal components analysis), and non-parametric analyses appropriate for two- and multi-group designs. The course emphasizes the integration of multivariate and advanced statistical design with applicable research paradigms.

PSY 513. Crisis Inter/Mgmt Indiv & Fam. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Examination of the dynamics and treatment of developmental and situational crises within families and other varied settings. Emphasis is on intervention in particular crises such as divorce, death, sexual or physical abuse, life-change, substance dependency, suicide, and emotional dysfunction. Theories and approaches to crisis intervention and management described with role play and field observations. Prerequisite: CPSY 550 or PSY 560, and CPSY 553, or approval of the department head.

PSY 514. Assess Intell And Achievement. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduces the selection, administration, and interpretation of selected tests used in the individual measurement of intelligence. Prerequisites: CPSY 558 and PSY 581, or approval of department head.

PSY 515. Physiological Psychology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of the biological basis of behavior with an emphasis on the structure and biochemistry of the human nervous system. Includes an exploration of the interactive relationships between biological processes, psychopharmacology, genetics, neurological disorders, normal growth and maturation, perception, memory, emotion, stress, mental disorders, consciousness, and communication. Contemporary theories and research are investigated and critiqued.

PSY 516. Adv Quant Mthds & Exper Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides an overview of advanced statistical techniques to analyze quantitative data resulting from experimental and quasi-experimental research designs. This course is a continuation of PSY 500 and 501 and requires students to demonstrate proficiency in the use of SPSS for data analysis. The course reviews One-Way and Two-Factor ANOVA. Other topics include ANCOVA, MANOVA, MANCOVA, multiple regression, logistic regression, data reduction techniques (factor analysis and principal components analysis), and non-parametric analyses appropriate for two- and multi-group designs. The course emphasizes the integration of multivariate and advanced statistical design with applicable research paradigms.

PSY 520. History and Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Historical analysis of the development of the science of psychology from early philosophical theories through the establishment of psychology as a science to modern theoretical positions.

PSY 521. Evolutionary Psychology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

In-depth evaluation of the current theories of adaptation with a large focus on how adaptation has influenced social, cognitive and developmental processes in humans. Evidence from cross-cultural studies as well as cross species studies will be reviewed and discussed.

PSY 522. Psychometrics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Systematic treatment of the logic of measurement, including such topics as scaling models, validity, variance and covariance, reliability, theories of measurement error and test construction.

PSY 560. Found of School Psychology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduces the foundations, professional standards, ethics, and laws related to the delivery of school psychological services. Prerequisite: admission to graduate school or approval of department head.

PSY 580. Personality Social Assess. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Instruction and supervision in the assessment of emotional, motivational, interpersonal, and attitudinal characteristics of children and adults. Includes the administration, scoring, and interpretation of many widely-used tests. Prerequisites: CPSY 558 and 581, or approval of the department head. Lab fee $50.

PSY 581. Assessment and Evaluation Fund. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines the nature and development of standardized tests, with emphasis on ethical standards, psychometric theory, test standards and test construction. Selection criteria and utilization of standardized and other instruments in various environments are considered. Includes evaluations and critiques of published tests and experiential exposure to different types of psychological tests. Prerequisite: PSY 500 or EDU 598, or approval of department head.

PSY 582. Behavior Mgmt And Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Examines basic theories of human learning, major approaches to behavior management and therapy and principles of applied behavior analysis. Formal treatment planning application and evaluation of programs for management of specific behavioral/psychological problems. Includes case review and practice in individual interventions. Prerequisite: CPSY 550 or PSY 560, and CPSY 553, or approval of the department head.

PSY 583. Consultation & Supervision. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduces the application of psychological principles of consultation and supervision in selected settings. Emphasis is on analysis of client and consultee/supervisor behaviors, individual and group communications, program evaluation and possible intervention options in selected environments. Prerequisites: CPSY 550 or PSY 560, and CPSY 553, or approval of department head.

PSY 584. Practicum II: Field Exp. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Continues Practicum I. The field experience will consist of 150 clock hours with 100 client contact hours. Prerequisite: PSY 505, 3.0 GPA, and consent of the practicum/internship director. Field experience fee $50.

PSY 586. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Directed independent study or research under the supervision of a member of the psychology faculty. Prerequisites: graduate standing and approval of department head.

PSY 587. Practicum III: Field Exp. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Continues Practicum II. The field experience will consist of 200 clock hours with 100 client contact hours. Prerequisites: PSY 584, 3.0 GPA, and consent of practicum/internship director. Field experience fee $50.

PSY 588. THESIS. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Scheduled when the student is ready to begin the thesis. No credit until the thesis is completed. Prerequisites: Completion of all course work required by the degree and consent of the major professor.

PSY 590. SPECIAL TOPICS. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of different topics each semester with a focus on contemporary issues in counseling. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

PSY 595. Internship I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Supervised professional activities in psychology. Major emphasis is placed on the student's involvement in successful practices in the area of interest. Students must have met all academic and professional standards of practice before placement. Lab experiences are included. Prerequisites: Completion of all course work required by the degree and application for internship. Field experience fee $50.

PSY 596. Internship II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Continued supervised experience of professional activities in psychology in the student's area of interest. Major emphasis is placed on the integration of theoretical and conceptual principles, as well as professional and personal skill development. Prerequisites: PSY 595 and application for internship. Field experience fee $50.

Dr. Robert Newby, Department Head
Department of Psychology and Counseling
Mathematics Building, Room 301
Box T-0820
Stephenville, Texas 76402
(254) 968-9090
newby@tarleton.edu
www.tarleton.edu/pc