Government, Legal Studies, and Philosophy

The Department of Government, Legal Studies, and Philosophy offers a Master of Arts degree in History with a thesis and non-thesis track.  The Master of Arts degree in History is designed to broaden students' knowledge in all historical areas, encourage abstract thinking about the world, as well as to develop research, writing, and analytical abilities in several areas of the discipline. This degree will prepare students who wish to pursue a Ph.D. in any related area, enhance all students' knowledge and skills in regard to teaching in public education, as well as provide professional training and opportunities in a wide range of vocations.

Master of Arts Degree In History

Required Courses
Thesis Track 1
HIST 5398Historiography and HIstorical Method3
HIST 5088Thesis 21-6
Select one of the following:3
State and Local history
Selected Topics in American History
Selected Topics in European History
Other Graduate History Courses24
Total Hours36
Non-Thesis Track
HIST 5398Historiography and HIstorical Method3
Select one of the following:3
State and Local history
Selected Topics in American History
Selected Topics in European History
Other Graduate History Courses30
Total36
Public History Option 3
HIST 5307Public History Seminar3
HIST 5308Museum Studies3
HIST 5309Historic Preservation3
HIST 5310Archival Principles and Practices3
HIST 5399Practicum, Field Problem or Internship (Two Semesters Required) 33
HIST 5399Practicum, Field Problem or Internship (Two Semesters Required) 33
Other Graduate History Courses18
Total Hours36
1

Each History student must demonstrate proficiency in at least one foreign language prior to the awarding of the M.A. degree. Proficiency will be measured either by the successful completion (with a C or better ) of 14 hours in a single foreign language (either on the undergraduate or graduate level), or by obtaining a passing score on a standardized foreign language exam administered by the department of General  Studies and Testing.

Each student will take a written comprehensive examination after completing 24 hours of course work. The examination, based on course work submitted for the M.A. degree, will be administered and evaluated by the student’s graduate advisory committee. If the examination result is unsatisfactory, the student will be allowed to retake the examination one additional time. Additional course work in areas of weakness may be required. 

2

 Each thesis track student will complete a thesis under the direction of a thesis advisor, who will chair the student’s graduate advisory committee. The student will enroll in HIST. 5088 (Thesis) only with prior approval of the Department Head and the Graduate History Advisor. The thesis will be prepared in accordance with the general procedures specified by the College of Graduate Studies. Upon completion of the thesis, the student will sit for an oral defense before a committee composed of his or her graduate advisory committee and a representative from the Graduate College. Under special circumstances, the thesis advisor, in consultation with the Graduate History Advisor and the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies, may modify this requirement.

3

 The student choosing the Public History Option will take 18 hours of content area History courses and 18 hours of public History courses, including 6 hours of internship at selected public History venues. Ordinarily the student choosing the Public History Option will not write a thesis. 

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 5305. Environmental Ethics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An inquiry into how humans ought to relate to nature, including questions about the moral standing of animals and other non-human beings, environmental justice, and what we may owe to future generations. In addition to exploring universal ethical issues concerning our relationships with the environment, the course will also consider exemplary American and Texan nature writers.

PHIL 5385. Philosophy Seminar. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Content varies according to the needs and desires of students. When topic varies, course may be taken for credit more than once.

Political Science Courses

POLS 5086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Conference course. Independent reading, research, discussion, under supervision of senior professor.

POLS 5310. International Environmental Issues. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to environmental politics and policy at the international level. The focus of this course is upon global environmental policy with particular attention paid to the processes that create and shape global environmental policy.

POLS 5311. Environmental Law. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Focuses on US environmental law and regulations including administrative law and common law. Major laws dealing with air, water, and hazardous waste will be assessed, including citizen participation within the legal process.

POLS 5330. Public Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The practical application of theories of public administration, the study of problems of administrative management in public organizations, and the use of law for administrative decision-making.

POLS 5340. US Public Policy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides an opportunity to review theory and elements of the development of public policy in the United States and to analyze this process in relation to research interests. A major research project on a specific policy issue is developed over the course of the term. Credit will not be awarded for both POLS 4340 and POLS 5340. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and GOVT 2306.

POLS 5360. Political Culture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of political culture as it forms and is formed by public policy. Examples may include the culture of environmental policy, bureaucratic policy, foreign policy, and others.

POLS 5361. Politics of Education. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the relationship between politics and education in America including K-12 and post-secondary systems.

POLS 5362. Environmental Policy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the politics of the natural environment with emphasis on the role of government in environmental protection.

POLS 5385. Political Science Seminar. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Contents vary according to the needs and desires of students. Independent reading, research, discussion, and writing under personal direction of instructor. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.

POLS 5388. Thesis. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Scheduled when student is ready to begin thesis. No credit until thesis is accepted.

POLS 5399. Practicum, Field Problem, or Internship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Supervised professional activities in school administration, counseling, supervision, college or public school teaching, or other public service professions. Major emphasis is placed on the student's involvement in successful practices in the area of professional interest. May be repeated once for credit. Field experience fee $50.

Dr. Nathaniel Cogley

Assistant professor

  • Dr. Nathaniel Cogley