Academic Information

Student Classifications

Type Hours
Freshmanless than 30 semester hours
Sophomore30-59 semester hours
Junior60-89 semester hours
Senior90 or more semester hours
Post-baccalaureateHolds baccalaureate degree but is not admitted for graduate study
GraduateHolds baccalaureate degree and is pursuing a graduate degree

Student Course Load

Undergraduate
Semester Hours 16 weeks (Fall/Spring) 10 weeks (Summer) 8 week sesssion 5 week session
Maximum load1915128
Full load12764

Special requests to take loads exceeding the stated maximums require approval of the appropriate academic dean. Requests to exceed by 3 or more hours require the additional approval of Academic Affairs.

Academic Honesty

Tarleton State University expects its students to maintain high standards of personal and scholarly conduct. Students guilty of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary action. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on an examination or other academic work, plagiarism, collusion, and the abuse of resource materials. The faculty member is responsible for initiating action for each case of academic dishonesty that occurs in his/her class.

Class Attendance

Student absences are considered by the University to be strictly between the individual student and faculty member. The faculty member has the responsibility and authority to determine whether make-up work can be done because of absences. Students may request make-up consideration for valid and verifiable reasons such as illness, death in the immediate family, legal proceedings, or participation in University-sponsored activities. With a University-sponsored activity the student contact will be coincident with an explanation being sent from the faculty/staff member who is responsible for the activity.

Restricted Activities Period

A restricted activities period is enforced each long semester, beginning prior to the start of final examinations and continuing through the last day of final examinations. During the restricted activities period, no examinations may be administered other than finals, no major assignments may be due, and no student activities may be held.

Rules for Students in Developmental Courses

Students in developmental courses:

  1. may not drop developmental courses (DGS 100, ENGL 100, MATH 100 or MATH 101, or RDG 100). Students will not be allowed to drop developmental courses, except for extraordinary situations;
  2. must participate in lab activities associated with the developmental courses;
  3. may not advance to the next course [ENGL 100 to ENGL 111, MATH 101 to MATH 101, or MATH 101 to college-level mathematics] until the student has completed the prerequisite course with a grade of “C” or better;
  4. who do not achieve a grade of “C” or better in a development course must re-enroll in this course during the student’s next semester.
Developmental Mathematics

A student placed in a development Mathematics course (MATH 100 or MATH 101) must enroll in this course during his/her first semester and continue enrollment in Mathematics courses until s/he has successfully completed a college level Mathematics course.

Developmental English

A student placed in ENGL 100 must enroll in this course during his/her first semester and continue enrollment in English courses until he/she has successfully completed the freshman-level English sequence [i.e., ENGL 111 and ENGL 112]. Students enrolled in ENGL 100 will be given diagnostic writing assessments during the first and second days of class. A good performance on either of these assessments will permit a student to switch from ENGL 100 to ENGL 111within the late registration period.

Exceptions to these rules require approval of the AVP for Student Success and Multicultural Initiatives.

Placement, Continuing Enrollment, and Completion Rules for Freshman-Level Mathematics and English Courses

The University believes that having students enrolled in the appropriate Mathematics and English courses early in their college careers is important to student success. Therefore, the Division of Academic Affairs and the Division of Enrollment and Information Management have established the following rules related to freshman-level Mathematics and English courses.

Students with disabilities may request appropriate accommodations for the College-Level Mathematics Placement Examinations by contacting the Director of Student Disability Services in the Mathematics Building, Room 201, at (254) 968-9400. Please provide documentation supporting requests for accommodations to Student Disability Services prior to the date of the exam.

Mathematics (Stephenville Campus Only)

1. Students without prior college credit for Mathematics courses will be placed in accordance with the following criteria:

MATH Course THEA Mathematics ASSET Elementary Algebra COMPASS Algebra
College-level mathematics (see section 2 below)270 or higher45 or higher60 or higher
101 “Fundamentals of College Algebra” (see section 3 below)230 to 26938 to 4439 to 59
100 “Basic Mathematics” (see section 3 below)229 or lower37 or lower38 or lower

MATH Course ACCUPLACER Elementary Algebra ACT Mathematics SAT Mathematics
College-level mathematics (see section 2 below)85 or higher20 or higher500 or higher
101 “Fundamentals of College Algebra” (see section 3 below)63 to 8417 to 19460 to 499
100 “Basic Mathematics” (see section 3 below)62 or lower16 or lower459 or lower

The student need exceed only one of the indicated test score minima to achieve the corresponding placement.

Students without prior college credit for a Mathematics course and without Mathematics scores on the THEA, ASSET, COMPASS, ACCUPLACER, ACT, or SAT must contact the Freshman Mathematics Coordinator or designee for placement.

2. College-level Mathematics at Tarleton includes:

Students must enroll in Mathematics during their first semester at Tarleton unless they are eligible for placement into college-level Mathematics and have met the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requirements in the skill area of Mathematics. Students who are:

  1. eligible for placement into college-level Mathematics and
  2. have met the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requirements in the skill area of Mathematics may choose to postpone initial Mathematics enrollment until their second regular semester at Tarleton. Following initial Mathematics enrollment, students must enroll in Mathematics every regular semester thereafter until the freshman Mathematics general education requirement has been satisfied.

Initial placement into the following freshman-level Mathematics courses is based on the results of a student’s performance on an optional College-Level Mathematics Placement Examination. Information concerning this examination is available from Student Assessment Services (254-968-9423; Mathematics Building, Room 201).

College-Level Mathematics Placement Examinations

Students who place initially into college-level mathematics (see Section 1 above) but who fail to satisfy the necessary prerequisite for advanced college-level placement into MATH 109, MATH 111, MATH 118, MATH 120, or MATH 131 may still achieve advanced placement by passing an appropriate College-Level Mathematics Placement Examination.

Upon the recommendation of an academic advisor, a student placing into college-level Mathematics but not having prior credit for MATH 107 (TCCNS = MATH 1314) is eligible for enrollment as indicated in the table below depending upon his/her performance on the indicated placement exam.

MATH Course Calculus Readiness Placement Advanced Algebra Placement
107, 108, or 11014 or lower14 or lower
11814 or lowerN/A
109, 111, or 131N/A15 or higher
12015 or higherN/A

Upon the recommendation of an academic advisor, a student placing into college-level mathematics and having (a) prior credit for MATH 107(TCCNS = MATH 1314) and (b) credit for high school-level Trigonometry or Pre-calculus is eligible for enrollment as indicated in the table below depending upon his/her performance on the Trigonometry placement exam.

MATH Course Trigonometry Placement
109 or 118, selected in consultation with the academic advisor17 or lower
12018 or higher

3. Developmental Mathematics Courses at Tarleton (MATH 100& MATH 101)

  1. A student placed in a development Mathematics course must enroll in this course during his/her first semester and continue enrollment in Mathematics courses until he/she has successfully completed a college level Mathematics course.
  2. A student may not advance to the next Mathematics course (MATH 100 to MATH 101 or MATH 101 to college-level mathematics) until the student has completed the prerequisite course with a grade of “C” or better.
  3. A student who does not achieve a grade of “C” or better in a development Mathematics course must re-enroll in this course during the student’s next semester.

4. Request for exceptions to these placement and continuing enrollment rules related to Mathematics must be directed to the Freshman Mathematics Coordinator or designee.

5. Failure by a student to adhere to these placement and continuing enrollment rules will result in the student being dropped from his/her courses and/or having a registration hold placed on the student’s record. This registration hold will not be removed until the student has made arrangements with the Dean of Student Success or designee to adhere to the placement and continuing enrollment rules related to Freshman-Level Mathematics courses.

English (Stephenville Campus Only)

Students with credit for ENGL 111(TCCNS = ENGL 1301) who have met the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requirements in the skill area of writing may choose to postpone initial enrollment in ENGL 112 (TCCNS = ENGL 1302) until their second regular semester at Tarleton following initial English enrollment. Students must enroll in English every regular semester thereafter until the freshman English general education requirement (i.e., ENGL 111& ENGL 112) has been satisfied. Note: A student with a score of 620 or higher on Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) verbal test or 28 or higher on ACT English test may request credit for ENGL 111by contacting Undergraduate Admissions.

  1. Students without prior college credit for ENGL 111(TCCNS = ENGL 1301) will be placed in accordance with the following criteria
    1.  
      ENGL Course ACT English SAT Verbal
      111 (see section 2 below)15 or higher400 or higher
      100 (see section 3 below)14 or lower390 or lower
      A student without prior college credit for ENGL 111(TCCNS = ENGL 1301) and without English scores on the ACT or SAT will be placed in ENGL 100.
  2.  ENGL 111 Intro to College Composition. Students must enroll in English during their first semester at Tarleton unless they are eligible for placement into ENGL 111 and have met the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requirements in the skill area of writing. Students who are (a) eligible for placement into ENGL 111 and (b) have met the TSI requirements in the skill area of writing may choose to postpone initial enrollment into ENGL 111 until their second regular semester at Tarleton. Following initial English enrollment, students must enroll in English every regular semester thereafter until the freshman English general education requirement (i.e., ENGL 111 & ENGL 112) has been satisfied.
  3. Developmental English at Tarleton (ENGL 100)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            A student placed in ENGL 100 must enroll in this course during his/her first semester and continue enrollment in English courses until s/he has successfully completed the freshman-level English sequence (i.e. ENGL 111 & ENGL 112).
    1. A student initially placed into ENGL 100 may still achieve placement into ENGL 111 by writing an in-class writing assignment given on the first and second class days who is judged to be successful enough to send the student on to ENGL 111.
    2. A student may not advance from ENGL 100 to ENGL 111 until the student has either (a) been advised by developmental English faculty that the student needs to drop ENGL 100 and register for ENGL 111 or (b) successfully completed ENGL 100 with a grade of “C” or better.
    3. A student who does not achieve a grade of “C” or better in ENGL 100 must re-enroll in this course during the student’s next semester.
  4. Request for exceptions to these placement and continuing enrollment rules related to English must be directed to the Director of the Writing Program or designee.
  5. Failure by a student to adhere to these placement and continuing enrollment rules will result in the student being dropped from his/her English courses and/or having a registration hold placed on the student’s record. This registration hold will not be removed until the student has made arrangements with the AVP for Student Success and Multicultural Initiatives or designee to adhere to the placement and continuing enrollment rules related to Freshman-Level English courses.
Successful Completion of Freshman-Level Mathematics and English Coursework (Applies to ALL Undergraduate Students)

All students are required to satisfy the General Education Requirements related to freshman-level Mathematics and English coursework as a condition for the baccalaureate degree. Students are encouraged to meet these requirements early in their academic programs and MUST successfully complete these requirements prior to achieving 75 semester hours.

Failure by a student to successfully complete Freshman-Level Mathematics and English coursework prior to achieving 75 semester hours will result in the student being dropped from his/her courses and/or having a registration hold placed on the student’s record. This registration hold will not be removed until the student has made arrangements with the Dean of Student Success or designee to adhere to these rules.

Course Credit

Credit by Examination

Tarleton State University students may earn course credit by demonstrated achievement on standardized tests. Students should check with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for subject areas in which Tarleton State University awards credit. Credit awarded for A/P and CLEP scores on transcripts from public universities or colleges in Texas will be accepted. Students may receive credit for courses and scores in effect at the time they enter Tarleton State University. A superior student may earn credit by examination in the following ways:

  1. A minimum score of 3 on the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Advanced Placement Examination;
  2. Depending on subject, scores ranging from a minimum 48 to 52 for the Subject Examination of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Credit is not available for the General Examinations;
  3. If CLEP tests are not available in a desired testing area, local departmentally prepared examinations may be petitioned. To be eligible for local testing, a student must have
    1. a minimum score of 1000 on the SAT or 21 on the ACT and
    2. completed at least two units with no grade below a B in the area of testing during high school; or have special permission from the department head;
  4. Depending on subject, scores ranging from a minimum 494 to 678 for the CEEB Achievement Test;
  5. A score of 620 on the verbal section of the SAT or 28 on the English section of the ACT.

Students taking departmental local examinations are charged a $5.00 per credit hour examination and recording fee for the credit to become a part of their academic records. Advanced placement in a subject area may be granted by the department head concerned. Permitting advanced placement does not necessarily mean approval for credit by examination. All acceptable credit earned by examination will be posted to the student’s permanent record if the student is enrolled at Tarleton State University through the official census date. Students should consult the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for specific information. The credit will be recorded with a grade of P (Pass) and the hours awarded. There will be no grade points assigned for this credit, and it will not be used in the computation for any grade point ratio.

Non-Standard Baccalaureate Level Credit

Tarleton State University accepts non-standard credit toward a baccalaureate degree from approved sources to a maximum of 30 credit hours. Non-standard sources of credit include Advanced Placement (AP), College-Level Exam Preparation (CLEP), International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), SAT and ACT, correspondence courses, military schools, departmental credit exams, and others. Information about approved courses is available through the Registrar’s Office.

Students admitted to Tarleton who believe they have more than 30 hours of non-standard credit available should contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to specify the courses they wish the university to accept. Such students may petition for acceptance of additional credit toward a baccalaureate degree plan. Current Tarleton students must petition and secure permission to count non-standard credit in excess of 30 hours toward a baccalaureate degree plan before beginning the process of securing that non-standard credit. The petition process is reserved for those credits which are otherwise approved but simply exceed 30 hours.

Actual course enrollment, e.g. correspondence courses, count toward maximum course load limits for each semester. Students contemplating any concurrent course enrollment must complete a Concurrent Enrollment form. Forms are available at the Registrar’s Office. Failure to seek and secure approval may lead to credit being disallowed.

Technical courses and work experience may only count toward certain specialized degree programs. That is not the same as non-standard credit and the conditions for acceptance and maximum applicable hours are covered by the particular degree requirements. Technical courses and work experience may not be counted toward traditional BA, BS, BBA, and similar undergraduate degrees.

International Baccalaureate Organization. Students who complete the IBO diploma with certain minimum scores are guaranteed acceptance of at least 24 hours of credit. This may exceed the hours regularly granted based on individual exam results. It is recommended that any student in the IBO program who anticipates applying to Tarleton see the Admissions section of this catalog and contact the Office of Undergraduate Admission for details.

Military Credit

The Office of Transfer Services, operating as part of Undergraduate Admissions at Tarleton State University, currently evaluates and articulates military credit with the following methods:

  1. Credit for Physical Education with a DD-214 and Honorable Discharge.
  2. Evaluation of SMAART, AART, Coast Guard, and Community College of the Air Force transcripts during the admissions process.
    1. Credit awarded based on ACE recommendations and nature of course (i.e. electrical maintenance versus personnel supervision).
    2. Where possible, ACE recommended credits transfer as direct matches to Tarleton courses
    3. Students may review evaluated credits by logging into My Gateway
  3. Students with technical credit based on military experience are encouraged to explore our BSAS and BAAS degree options.

Audit Policy

A student may enroll to audit one or more courses under the following conditions:

  1. Application to audit a course must be made through the Registrar’s Office. Approval of audit requests is at the discretion of the Registrar’s Office and a record of audit enrollment is kept in the Registrar’s Office. The request from can be found at www.tarleton.edu/registrar/studentforms.html.
  2. Written consent from the instructor and department head is required prior to attendance in class.
  3. No audit enrollee is to be permitted to sit in class more than one period.
  4. Space and any required instructional equipment must be available. Evaluation of audit requests may be postponed until the end of registration if there are questions about availability.
  5. The extent of the student’s participation in the activities of the class is at the discretion of the instructor and is to be designated prior to enrollment.
  6. No student may audit a course offered on an individual instruction basis.
  7. To receive university credit from a previously audited class, the student must retake the class and pay the appropriate fees.
  8. An audit fee is required for each course at the time the request is submitted. In addition to the audit fee, audit students must pay any laboratory fee, course fee, practice fee, or other fee stipulated for the course. Fees associated with an audit request are not refunded unless Tarleton denies the audit request.
Concurrent Enrollment at Other Institutions

Students with individual hardship situations that might be improved by their having concurrent enrollment at another college or university may request permission for concurrent enrollment through regular academic channels (academic advisor, department head, and dean). If permission is granted, such credit hours earned may be applied toward degree requirements at Tarleton, however, courses completed without such approval generally may not apply toward degree requirements at Tarleton. Written permission from the student’s dean is required prior to concurrent enrollment in extension course work or in any resident courses from other institutions. Approval to take correspondence courses from other institutions must be granted by the Registrar’s Office, academic department head, and dean. Course load limits are not waived for students seeking concurrent enrollment.

Grading System

At mid-semester, preliminary grades will be assigned to freshman and sophomore students in 100- and 200-level courses and made available to the student. Final grades in all courses will be available on myGateway at the end of each semester.

The student’s term grade in any subject shall be designated as one of the following letters:

Grade Description
AExcellent, 4 grade points per semester hour
BGood, 3 grade points per semester hour
CFair, 2 grade points per semester hour
DPassing; 1 grade point per semester hour
FFailing
IIn-progress (used for non-completed thesis course work)
KIncomplete (under exceptional circumstances, see below)
QWithdrawal from course, no grade designated
WWithdrawal from university, no grade designated
WFWithdrawal failing from university (included in GPA)
P(1)Pass
S(1)Satisfactory
UUnsatisfactory
NGNo credit

1

 Signifies credit with neutral grade point value.

The lowest passing grade is D. Students should keep in mind the fact that some universities and colleges do not accept a D in transfer. A D is not considered passing for developmental courses.

In most instances, if a course is repeated at this institution, only the best grade in the course is counted in computing the GPA.

The grade K shall be recorded for a student only in case of extraordinary circumstances. This entry is used only in such cases after the instructor and his/her department head have concurred that the incomplete entry is justified. A grade of K must be made up by the last day that course grades are due to the Registrar’s Office during the next long semester and in all cases before registering for the next sequential course. Should this grade not be reported to the Registrar’s Office within the prescribed time limit, it automatically becomes an F.

A student who drops a course on or before the census date receives no grade, and the course will not be listed on that student’s permanent record.

Scholastic Honors

Honor Roll and Distinguished Student Recognition

An “A” HONOR ROLL is published at the end of each semester listing students who have completed 12 credit hours or more during the period and have made A’s in all courses taken for credit.

Students may be designated as Distinguished Students by meeting the following criteria:

  • No grade below a C
  • Completed at least 12 semester credit hours per semester
  • GPA:
            3.25 for Freshman and Sophomores
            3.50 for Juniors and Seniors
Honors Classes and Honors Degrees

Tarleton offers honors classes in most general education subjects, including English, History, Political Science, Chemistry, Biology, Ecology, Mathematics and Speech. Honors classes offered in a particular semester are announced in the published course schedule and publicized in flyers and other campus publications.

Honors courses offer intellectually challenging material, innovative approaches to the subject, increased opportunities for honing critical thinking and writing skills, and the opportunity to interact closely with similarly motivated students and with outstanding faculty. Honors courses often have smaller limits on class size. To register for an honors class a student must have either a 3.0 GPA or the instructor’s permission.

Official designation for honors classes will appear on the student’s permanent transcript. Any student who completes 18 or more hours of such classes with a minimum 3.0 GPA in honors classes and overall will receive recognition as an Honors Degree Program graduate.

Academic Appeals

Student academic appeals are handled according to the following guidelines:

  1. Each department shall develop its own formula for dealing with student grievances of an academic nature. Such policy should be in writing in the departmental office and available to students.
  2. A student who wishes to appeal a decision of a faculty member or staff member of a department should ask for a review by that person within 60 days of the originating event unless the departmental procedures specifically give more time than this. The person is expected to give the student a response within 30 days. If the person is unavailable, if a response is not made within 30 days, or if the student is unsatisfied with the response, then the student should inform the department head of the appeal. For an appeal of a course grade, the originating event shall be considered to be the posting of the grade to the university record.
  3. A student wishing to appeal a decision to the department head must do so within 120 days of the originating event unless the departmental procedures specifically give more time. The department head will review as specified by the departmental grievance procedures.
  4. A student who is unsatisfied with the outcome of the departmental grievance process may appeal to the dean of the college. This must be within 30 days of the notification of the departmental decision. The dean will review the appeal and render a decision. The dean may require that the appeal be in writing.
  5. A student unsatisfied with the decision of the dean may appeal in writing to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs within 30 days of notification of the decision of the college. The Vice President for Academic Affairs may decide that no further review is justified, may render a decision upon review, or may appoint a five-member committee to consider the appeal. The committee will consist of a faculty member from outside the involved department as chair, two other faculty members, and two student members. After hearing both sides of the grievance, the committee shall render an opinion to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who shall render the final judgment.

Drop and Withdrawal Policies

Dropping Classes

A student desiring to drop a course should follow this procedure:

  1. Secure a Q-Drop Request Form and instructions from www.tarleton.edu/registrar;
  2. Proceed to an academic advisor and obtain his/her signature;
  3. Return the Q-Drop Request Form along with any other necessary approval as indicated on the form to the Registrar’s Office.

The effective date of dropping a course is the date the card is returned to the Registrar’s Office.

Note: The student should attend the class until this procedure is completed to avoid penalty for absences. Students will not be allowed to drop developmental courses, except for extraordinary situations. Students will not be allowed to drop DGS 101 University Seminar I, DGS 102 University of Seminar II; ENGL 111 Intro to College Composition, ENGL 112 College Comp and Research; or MATH 107 College Algebra, MATH 108 Elem Applied Math until after mid-semester, expect with special permission (see www.tarleton.edu/registrar/specialpermissioncourses.html). The last day for dropping courses is identified in the University Calendar .

Withdrawal from The University

An application for withdrawal from the University must be initiated in the Office of the Registrar.

  1. Refer to the census chart below to determine the last day for dropping courses and the last day to withdraw from the University.
  2. A student who withdraws on or before the last day to drop courses will receive a grade of W in all courses.
  3. A student who withdraws after the last day to drop courses will receive a grade of WF in all courses. The student may appeal to the instructor of each class for a change of grade from WF to W if he/she was passing at the time of withdrawal.
  4. A student who fails to withdraw officially will receive a grade of F in all courses in progress.
  5. In circumstances where in-person withdrawal is not feasible, the student should call or write the Office of the Registrar and request an “Official Withdrawal Request Form.”
  6. In cases where the student is unable to contact the Registrar's office him/herself because of medical reasons or other emergency situations, a spouse or family member can contact the Registrar's office on behalf of the student to get instructions on what needs to be done in order to assist the student in withdrawin
  7. The refund policy established by the State of Texas is listed under “Refunds” in this catalog. All refunds are subject to this policy.
Census Chart
Length of Class in Weeks Official Census Date Last Date to Drop with a "Q" or Withdraw with a "W"
3 weeksSecond class dayFriday of second week
4 or 5 weeksFourth class dayFriday of third week
6, 7, or 8 weeksSixth class dayFriday of fifth week
9, 10, or 11 weeksSeventh class dayFriday of sixth week
12, 13, or 14 weeksNinth class dayFriday of eighth week
15 weeks or moreTwelfth class dayFriday of tenth week
Limits on Dropped Courses and Withdrawals

Under the requirements of Senate Bill 1231, 80th Legislature, an undergraduate student at Tarleton who enrolled in higher education for the first time in Fall 2007 and thereafter is permitted a total of 6 dropped courses, including any courses dropped at another Texas public institution of higher education. Specifics of the law are available in the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Regulations, Chapter 4, Section 4.10 (a). Requests for a drop to be considered an acceptable exception will be reviewed under the guidelines given in the regulations and coordinated through the Dean of Enrollment Management. Note, if a student withdraws from the University, the courses enrolled in that semester do not count in the 6 drop limit.

A student who wishes to drop a course in excess of 6 should visit www.tarleton.edu/registrar/limitForDrops.html and contact the Registrar’s Office for appeal procedures. The student may wish to read the circumstances justifying an exception listed in the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Regulations before filing the request. Requests are not restricted to these categories but the student is asked to refer to a listed category if it is believed to apply. A student who is not satisfied with the decision of the Dean of Enrollment Management may file a written request for an administrative review by the Vice President for Enrollment & Information Management. This administrative review will be limited to verification that the student has had the opportunity to present appropriate documentation and that the provided materials and statements were considered in making the decision.

An undergraduate student at Tarleton who first enrolled in higher education prior to Fall 2007 and who initially entered Tarleton for the first time in Fall 1998 or after is covered by a similar University rule which counts only drops at Tarleton toward the maximum of 6 and which includes withdrawals from the University in the count. Specific information is available in the catalog in force at the time of the student’s initial enrollment at Tarleton.

Fee Increases from Legislative Mandates

There are legislative mandates related to increased fees for repeating courses and excessive hours to achieve an undergraduate degree for students paying in-state tuition rates. The increase to in-state tuition rates for each of the three categories is $100 per credit hour. The first category applies to students repeating the same course for the third time or more since Fall 2002. The second category applies to students enrolled for the first time in Fall 1999 and thereafter who are paying in-state tuition rates, who accumulate excess hours beyond that required for an undergraduate degree. The fee increase starts at 45 hours beyond the undergraduate degree for students beginning in Fall 1999 or after but before Fall 2006 and starts at 30 hours beyond the undergraduate degree for students beginning in Fall 2006 and after. Students who have not selected a major are considered, by state law, to have a degree requirement of 120 hours. Details about each of these situations are available by visiting www.tarleton.edu/registrar/timelygraduation/index.html

Any student who is being charged additional tuition rates under either category may file an appeal. The appeal is per semester so a student who wishes to appeal must file an appeal for every semester affected by the repeated course rule and/or the excess hours beyond a degree rule. The appeal form and procedures may be obtained by contacting the Registrar’s Office or by visiting www.tarleton.edu/registrar/timelygraduation/index.html

New undergraduate students enrolling in an institution of higher education in Fall 1999 or afterward are subject to the conditions of Senate Bill 345 passed in the 76th Legislative session. The law states that a resident undergraduate student whose attempted hours exceeds, by at least 45 semester credit hours, the number of hours required for completion of the degree program may be charged tuition at a higher rate. The higher rate will not exceed the rate charged to non-resident undergraduate students. A resident student is one who pays the in-state rate for tuition purposes.

As of Fall 2006, new undergraduate students whose attempted hours exceeds, by at least 30 hours of the hours required for the completion of the degree program, may be charged tuition at a higher rate. Texas Education Code § 54.014 provides a limit on the number of hours an undergraduate Texas resident may attempt while paying in-state tuition rates. This Legislation impacts new undergraduate students enrolling in an institution of higher education in Fall 1999 or thereafter. Students who exceed the limit of attempted hours could be charged tuition not to exceed that of out-of-state tuition rates. Tarleton State University adopted a fee of $100 per credit hour for students who exceed attempted hours under the Undergraduate Funding Limit Rule.

New Undergraduate students who started Fall 1999 through Summer 2006 and attempt 45 or more semester credit hours beyond the hours required to complete their degree will be charged an additional $100 per credit hour for these excess hours.

New Undergraduate students who started Fall 2006 and thereafter and attempt 30 hours or more semester credit hours beyond the hours required to complete their degree will be charged an additional $100 per credit hour for these excess hours.

Students who have not selected a major are considered, by state law, to have a degree requirement of 120 hours.

Warning, Probation and Suspension

The following applies to all students unless more restrictive rules are included as part of special admission conditions or unless a more restrictive rules have been approved for a program, department, or college.

The purpose of academic warning, probation and suspension is to make the student aware of the University’s concern that satisfactory progress is not being made in his or her course of study. Early notification of this concern maximizes the student’s opportunity to make appropriate adjustments that will result in remaining in good standing. A 2.0 total institution GPA is the lowest acceptable academic standard because this level mirrors the minimum GPA requirement for graduation. The total institution GPA used in this policy is defined as the best attempt on all courses taken at Tarleton State University; grades on transfer work are excluded. A student with a 2.0 or better total institution GPA is considered to be in good academic standing.

Warning: Each student is responsible for knowing his or her academic status and the regulations that apply. Students who do not abide by the regulations governing their particular status may be required to reduce their academic loads or withdraw from the University without special consideration.

Warning, Probation and Suspension Rules
  1. If a student’s total institution GPA drops below 1.00 at the end of any long semester (fall or spring), the student will be suspended.
  2. If a student who has been in good standing has a total institution GPA between 1.00 and 1.99 at the end of any long semester, the student will be placed on academic warning.
  3. A student who has been on academic warning during a long semester is subject to the following:
    1. At the end of the semester, if the total institution GPA is 2.00 or above, the student is returned to good standing.
    2. At the end of the semester, if the total institution GPA is between 1.00 and 1.99, the GPA for the semester will be used to determine the student’s status.
      1. If the GPA for the semester is less than 2.00, the student will be suspended.
      2. If the GPA for the semester is 2.00 or higher, the student will be placed on probation.
    3. At the end of the semester, if the total institution GPA is below 1.00, the student will be suspended.
  4.  A student on probation who has less than a 2.00 total institution GPA at the end of the next long semester will be suspended. A student on probation who has a 2.00 or better total institution GPA at the end of the next long semester will be removed from probation and returned to good standing.
  5. A student who transfers from Tarleton while on academic warning or probation and then returns (having met transfer requirements) has the same academic standing the first long semester back at Tarleton as though there had been no transfer.
  6. A student who is suspended from Tarleton and takes no transferable college level courses during the term of the suspension may return to Tarleton after the term of the suspension and will be on academic warning the first long semester back at Tarleton.
  7. A student who is suspended from Tarleton is advised not to take transferable college level courses during the term of suspension. Such a student who does take transferable college level courses during the term of suspension must meet Tarleton’s transfer requirements (as well as not having been enrolled in any transferable college level courses for an appropriate time) in order to be readmitted and will be on academic warning the first long semester back at Tarleton.
  8. Any student, whether in good standing, on academic warning, or on probation, will be suspended at the end of any long semester if his or her total institution GPA is below 1.00.
Length of Suspension

The first suspension is for one long semester. The second is for one calendar year, and the third is indefinite. Three calendar years after imposition of third suspension, the student may apply for readmission; this application will be evaluated by the appropriate Dean, but readmission is not guaranteed. Students who have been absent for one or more long semesters must reapply to the university for admission.

Summer School

A student on academic warning or probation may attend summer school at Tarleton (transfer requirements having been met, if applicable).

Students placed on first suspension at the end of a spring semester may request their dean’s approval to attend summer school. A student attending summer school while on first suspension, who has a cumulative GPA of 2.00 at the end of the last summer session attended, will be returned to good standing.

Forgiveness Options

An undergraduate student enrolled at Tarleton may choose to exercise one, but not both, of the following forgiveness options:

  1. OPTION I
    1. Grades for any one semester of Tarleton work taken more than 5 years before a student’s current enrollment at Tarleton may be deleted for computation of total institution GPA if the student files a request with the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. This option may be exercised one time only.
  2. OPTION II
    1. After a student has attempted ninety or more hours at Tarleton, grades for one semester of Tarleton work may be deleted for computation of total institution GPA if the student files a request with the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. This option may be exercised one time only.

When a student has exercised one of these forgiveness options, grades for the semester selected by the student will be deleted in computing the total institution grade point average. Under either option, all courses and grades will continue to appear on the student’s transcript and to be counted toward restrictions in total number of withdrawals, fees for repeated courses, fees resulting from excess hours beyond the degree, etc. In applying the option, all grades from the chosen semester are deleted from the GPA, not just low or failing grades. Also, no classes taken in the semester being forgiven may be counted on the student’s degree plan. A student seeking to exercise either option must be enrolled at Tarleton at the time he/she requests the forgiveness option.

Requirements for a Baccalaureate Degree

General Requirements
  1. A GPA of 2.00 or better is required on all work counted toward a degree. A GPA of 2.00 or better is required for all work in the major field of study and counted toward a degree.
  2. All transfer students must have an overall GPA of 2.00 or better in all courses taken at Tarleton in their major field of study and counted toward a degree as well as an overall GPA of 2.00 or better in all courses taken at Tarleton and counted toward a degree.
Residence Requirements

Residence is satisfied only by official enrollment in and completion of course work applied toward the degree requirements.

  1. A minimum of 30 semester hours of work counted toward the degree must be completed with Tarleton. The work completed at Tarleton and counted toward the degree must include at least 24 advanced hours (300 or 400 level) and 12 of these advanced hours must be in the major subject.
  2. A maximum of 68 semester hours of academic credit will be accepted for degree credit from a two-year institution.
Writing Proficiency Requirement

All students are required to satisfy the Writing Proficiency Requirement as a condition for the baccalaureate degree. Beginning Fall 2012, the Writing Proficiency Exam will be discontinued and all students must satisfy the Writing Proficiency Requirement through the Writing Intensive Program. Between Fall 2010 and Summer 2012, students will satisfy the writing requirement through either the Writing Proficiency Exam or Writing Intensive Program in accordance with the following rules:

First Term of Enrollment at Tarleton Writing Proficiency Exam Writing Intensive Program
Prior to Fall 2007All StudentsN/A
Fall 2007, Spring 2008, or Summer 2008Transfer students with 30 hours or moreTransfer students with less than 30 hours and all first-time freshmen
Fall 2008, Spring 2009, or Summer 2009Transfer students with 60 hours or moreTransfer students with less than 60 hours and all first-time freshmen
Fall 2009, Spring 2010, or Summer 2010Transfer students with 90 hours or moreTransfer students with less than 90 hours and all first-time freshmen
Fall 2010 and beyondN/AAll Students
Writing Proficiency Exam

To satisfy this requirement, these students must successfully complete the Writing Proficiency Exam. Beginning Fall 2010 to Summer 2012, students required to complete the Writing Proficiency Exam for their degree will take this exam by appointment. The office of Student Assessment Services will coordinate the administration of this exam in accordance with the timeline listed on the University Calendar. Students should contact this office to schedule a testing time.

Writing Intensive Program

To satisfy this requirement, these students must have credit for four writing intensive (WI) courses. Two of these four courses must be upper level WI courses within the major or designed for the degree plan. The remaining WI requirement should be met through general education courses. The two general education-level courses should be Freshman Composition.

General Education Requirements

All degree programs leading to the baccalaureate degree include the following University General Education Requirements 1, 2:

Communications
ENGL 111 [WI] Intro to College Composition3
ENGL 112 [WI] College Comp and Research 33
Select one of the following:3
Fund Spch Comm
Public Speaking
Mathematics
MATH 107College Algebra (or higher) 33
Lab Sciences from BIOL, CHEM, GEOL, PHYS8
Visual & Performing Arts from ART, F A, I T, MUSC, THEA 43
Humanities: Select one of the following3
Literature course in English
Intro to Philosophy
United States History
HIST 201U.S. History through 18773
HIST 202US History Since Reconstruct3
Political Science
POLS 201Amer Natl Govt3
POLS 202Texas Government3
Social & Behavioral Sciences
Select one of the following:3
Cultural Anthropology
Introduction To Sociology
Race and Ethnic Relations
General Psychology
Intro to Logic
Ethics in the Professions
Intro To Eco
Prin Of Economics: Macro
Intro to Ag Eco
Archeology
World Regional Geography
Intro Human Geography
Geography Of Texas
World Hist To 1700
World Hist Since 1700 (First Year Seminar )
First Year Seminar 61
Total Hours42

1

General Education Requirements are subject to review and change by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

2

Some degree programs specify the courses that satisfy these requirements. A student should consult with an academic advisor in selecting general education requirement courses.

3

 Students must enroll in these courses as outlined in the PLACEMENT, CONTINUING ENROLLMENT, AND COMPLETION RULES for Freshman-Level Mathematics and English Courses.

4

Visual and performing arts course must be historical, appreciative, or theoretical in nature; it may not be an applied or performance course. Courses that meet this requirement are ART 131 Art Appreciation, ART 231 Art History I, ART 232 Art History II, ART 331 Art History of America; F A 101 The Arts in History, F A 135 Visual and Theatre Arts, F A 160 The Art of Film, F A 401 Arts in Cont Society; I T 340 Ceramics and Jewelry; MUSC 113 Fundamentals of Music, MUSC 120 Popular Music in America, MUSC 325 Jazz History, MUSC 326 History of Music I, MUSC 327 History of Music II, MUSC 328 HISTORY OF MUSIC III; THEA 105 Introduction to the Theatre, THEA 207 History of Theatre I, THEA 208 History of Theatre II, THEA 404 Theory & Crit.

5

Intended primarily to satisfy general education requirements for engineering and engineering related majors; advisor permission required.

6

 For additional information contact your departmental advisor or the advising center.

Graduation Under a Particular Catalog

To receive a degree from Tarleton State University, a student must complete all requirements for a degree as set forth in a particular University catalog within six (6) years of the date of the catalog selected. For example, a student who chooses to graduate under the requirements of the 2011-2012 catalog must complete all requirements for the degree under that catalog prior to August 2017 graduation. For students serving on active duty with the Armed Forces of the United States between the dates of their matriculation and graduation, the six-year limit will be extended one year for each year of active duty served, up to a maximum of four years. Subject to the six-year window, Tarleton students may choose the catalog in force:

  1. at the time the student first enrolls at Tarleton State University;
  2. for any subsequent year that the student is registered at Tarleton State University. Transfer students who pre-register for the first time in the spring for the following fall may choose to be under the catalog in force that spring; or
  3. at the time the student first enrolled in higher education.

Note: A student registering for the first time in the summer session may choose the catalog applying to the previous spring or the subsequent fall.

Degree Plan Information

Students are encouraged to file a degree plan before the junior year. Following initial enrollment at Tarleton, students with 75 or more hours attempted who do not have a degree plan on file may be barred from registration.

  1. MAJOR
    1. The major must be declared by the beginning of the junior year for advising purposes.
    2. A minimum of 24 semester hours is required for a major, of which at least 12 must be in advanced courses in the major subject.
    3. A double major requires that a degree plan be filed for each major.
  2. MINOR
    1. A minor consists of a minimum of 18 hours in a field other than the major, of which at least 6 hours must be advanced.
    2. Declaration of a minor by the student is optional in most degree programs but strongly recommended. There are restrictions on minors for the interdisciplinary degree programs (BAAS, BSLS, BSAS, BAT). If a minor is desired, it must be declared on the degree plan. Students may declare no more than two minors.
    3. Lists of possible minors for baccalaureate degrees are in the UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC PROGRAMS section of the catalog.
  3. DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES needed as preparation for regular University requirements (DGS 100, RDG 100, ENGL 100, and MATH 100 and 101) cannot be applied as degree plan contents.
     
  4. CREDIT HOUR REQUIREMENTS
    1. The minimum number of semester credit hours for a baccalaureate degree is 120.
    2. Unless recommended otherwise by the appropriate dean and approved by the provost, 45 hours of advanced (upper level) credit are required for all baccalaureate degrees.
  5. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS
    1. A student classified as a senior cannot take a freshman course that carries the same academic prefix description as the student’s first or second declared major field.
    2. A student may count toward the degree not more than 6 hours of activity Physical Education credits.

Class Rings

Students may order class rings during the semester following completion of 60 semester hours of degree credit. Students will receive notification by mail from Jostens Ring Company of their eligibility. Students may order their official Tarleton ring at Ring Days or may order online at www. jostens.com. Ring days are held throughout the year at the Tarleton Alumni Center and at the Thompson Student Center. Students will receive their rings at the Tarleton Alumni Association Official Ring Presentation Ceremony held in the Spring and Fall semesters.

Application for a Degree

  1. A candidate for a degree must apply for the degree by filing an “Application for Graduation” with the Registrar (undergraduate students) or the Graduate Office (graduate students) no later than specified in the University Calendar.
  2. To be considered for degree conferral, a candidate must be in good standing with the University. All contractual and financial obligations to the University must be satisfied.

Eligibility for Honors Graduation

To be eligible for honors graduation, a student must complete no fewer than 30 hours at Tarleton. The GPA is calculated on the total number of hours listed on a transcript (Overall GPA) and the total number of hours taken at Tarleton (Institutional GPA).  Students who qualify for Honors Graduation must have a 3.50 or greater for both the Overall GPA and the Total Institutional GPA.  Honors graduates will be recognized as follows based on the smaller of the two GPAs:

  • 3.90-4.00 GPA – Summa Cum Laude
  • 3.75-3.89 GPA – Magna Cum Laude
  • 3.50-3.74 GPA – Cum Laude

Students who are members in good standing of national honor societies that are recognized by Tarleton State University and that require a 3.2 cumulative GPA or higher for membership may have that membership identified on their transcripts.

Tuition Rebate

A $1,000 tuition rebate from the state of Texas is offered to qualifying students who graduate from Tarleton State University with a bachelor’s degree and no more than 3 hours over the minimum number of hours required for the degree. Beginning with students admitted the first time in Fall 2005, a student must also graduate in a timely manner to earn the tuition rebate. Detailed information regarding graduating in a timely manner and other requirements to qualify for tuition rebate can be found at www.collegefortexans.com. Students must apply for the tuition rebate prior to receiving their degree. This rebate program is effective for students who entered a bachelor’s degree program as freshmen during or after Fall 1997. Additional information is available from the Registrar’s Office.

Special Degree Programs

Accelerated Degree Programs

Tarleton State University offers an accelerated degree program, which is intended to allow a student who enters Tarleton as a freshman to complete a baccalaureate degree in three years. (Please note: To complete a degree in three years may require that a student attend summer school for at least one summer.) The three-year program is intended for students who enter Tarleton with strong academic preparation. To be eligible for the accelerated program, an entering freshman must:

  1. have graduated from an accredited high school with a ranking in the top quarter of the high school class;
  2. be exempt from TSI because of exam scores or have passed all parts of TSI with scores that would not require the student to enroll in any developmental courses at Tarleton; and
  3. score at least 1050 on the SAT or 23 on the ACT.

A currently-enrolled Tarleton student or a transfer student with less than 30 hours of transferable college credit is eligible to participate in the program if he/she meets the above requirements and has a college GPA of at least 3.0. A currently-enrolled Tarleton student or transfer student with more than 30 hours of college credit may participate in the program if he/she has a college GPA of at least 3.0.

A high school student who hopes to participate in Tarleton’s accelerated program may wish to get some college credits while still in high school, through dual enrollment, concurrent enrollment, or advanced placement. High school counselors can provide information about such programs.

Students admitted to the program should take no more than 19 hours in their first long semester at Tarleton; the number of hours may be higher for students with exemplary high school grades or SAT/ACT scores. Students who complete at least 15 hours with a GPA of at least 3.00 their first semester in the program will be authorized to enroll in up to 21 hours the following semester. A student maintaining a Tarleton GPA in excess of 3.25 may request authorization to enroll in more than 21 hours for a long semester.

At any time that a participant’s Tarleton GPA drops below 3.00 or he/she completes less than 15 hours in a long semester, the student will no longer be considered a part of the accelerated degree program.

Program participants must satisfy all requirements for their degree programs, including total semester credit hour requirements. They may request minor modification of some University general education requirements (i.e., a substitution of one course for another). Such a request should be directed to the Office of Academic Affairs. Students in the program may request departmental authorization to take courses out of sequence (without designated prerequisites) when necessary.

Participants will be advised in their academic departments and by a special designated academic counselor who will help participants plan their programs. The counselor will advise participants about methods of accelerating their degree programs (including CLEP tests, problems courses, correspondence courses, and departmental exams) and will also monitor the progress of students in the program.

Interdisciplinary Degree Programs

Tarleton State University offers the following degree programs that are interdisciplinary in nature: the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (BAAS), Bachelor of Applied Technology (BAT), and the Bachelor of Science in Applied Science (BSAS). The BAAS and BSAS allow the student to apply vocational or technical training to his/her degree program while the BAT typically requires the student to have completed an associate degree in an appropriate technical field. In all cases the student is encouraged to make contact with an academic advisor in the appropriate department who is familiar with the specific program requirements. Students in these degree programs must meet all Tarleton requirements that are established as conditions for baccalaureate degrees unless specific waivers have been approved. These include, but are not restricted to, general education requirements, residency, and upper-level hour requirements. Students in these degree programs may not get a minor in any support area required for the degree.

The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences Degree (BAAS)

The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (BAAS) is designed for the student with training in a technical area. This degree utilizes education received at technical schools, community colleges, military technical schools, etc. A student must have completed at least 12 semester credit hours (or equivalent) in technical training to be eligible for consideration. With appropriate documentation, the technical training may be supplemented with a maximum of 21 semester credit hours for work experience. A student must have at least 33 semester credit hours (or equivalent) in the combination of technical training and work experience to be eligible for consideration. In all cases, the technical training, work experience (if any), and proposed degree area must be directly related to each other.

The approved occupational areas for the BAAS degree are: Agriculture*, Business, Criminal Justice Administration, Information Technology, and Manufacturing and Industrial Management. Tarleton does not guarantee the availability of all occupational areas. An occupational area is available only if an academic department related to the occupational area is currently sponsoring applicants.

A student interested in the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences should:

  1. review the admission requirements;
  2. contact the Office of the Registrar for a list of sponsoring departments; and
  3. meet with an academic advisor in the sponsoring department. The student will submit written records related to educational training and work experience (if any). The student is responsible for securing all related documentation.

The department will review the written records and decide whether to sponsor a degree plan application. Sponsored degree plan applications will be considered by the Interdisciplinary Degree Programs (IDP) Committee. Degree plan applications will not be considered until a student has completed at least 3 semester credit hours at Tarleton (or is currently enrolled in at least 3 hours at Tarleton). Degree plans approved by the Committee will be processed through regular University channels. Final approval will depend on completion of the University review process.

Quantitative Requirements for BAAS Degree Programs

  1. Occupational Specialization                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     The occupational specialization is a maximum of 33-36 semester credit hours (or equivalent) directly related to the degree area. These credit hours may consist of technical training and credit for work experience. Each of these has restrictions.
    1. The technical training must be such that it can be equated to vocational-technical schools. The IDP committee will rule on the admissibility of technical training.
    2. No student who has less than 12 semester credit hours of technical training will be considered for the program. The possible credit for technical training ranges from 12 semester credit hours up to and including all 36 hours of occupational specialization in the degree (33-36 semester credit hours).
    3. Credit for work experience is awarded only after the IDP Committee has reviewed the written documentation of the work experience and is limited to a maximum award of 4 semester credit hours per year of qualifying experience. The committee may award less than this maximum. A total of 21 semester credit hours is the greatest possible amount awarded for work experience.
    4. No student will be considered for the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences degree that has less than 33 semester credit hours in technical training or the combination of technical training and work experience.
    5. Sponsoring departments will require a minimum of 33 and a maximum of 36 semester credit hours of technical training or a combination of technical training and work experience, depending upon the respective program.
  2. Emphasis Area                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      (Minimum 24 semester credit hours, at least 12 to be upper level.) The emphasis area is to be related to and supportive of the occupational specialization. The advisor and the IDP committee will work together in selecting courses that meet the individual needs of each student.

*Note: The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences degree in Agriculture is being phased-out by the University. No new admissions will be allowed.

The Bachelor of Science in Applied Science

The student pursuing the BSAS must complete the following, in addition to the University general education requirements:

Occupational Specialization
Technical Training12-36
Approved Electives0-24
Advanced hours in emphasis area 124
Advanced Electives12
CIS Electives (LL or UL)3
Electives3
Total Hours54-102

 1 Departments may determine courses

The Bachelor of Science in Applied Science is available in Business Administration. Note that work experience is not a part of this degree program. Students must work closely with the departmental advisor(s) responsible for this program.

The Bachelor of Applied Technology (BAT) and the Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS)

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Applied Technology or the Bachelor of Applied Science will have completed an appropriate associate degree at a community college before beginning one of these programs. There must be a close fit between the technical associate degree and the degree area, and students are encouraged to seek clarification before beginning the associate degree program to guarantee compatibility with approval criteria. For the Bachelor of Applied Technology the available emphasis area is Health Professions Technology, and for the Bachelor of Applied Science the available emphasis area is Veterinary Technology.

Other Academic Programs
Cooperative Education

Cooperative education in institutions of higher learning is an academic program that provides students with an opportunity to integrate formal academic work with planned and supervised experience in industry, government, or service agencies. Students are given an opportunity, through cooperative education, to earn a salary that may be used to finance their education. More importantly, the program allows student to participate in off-campus work experiences that are integrated with and that supplement their entire education and career goals.

Students may see their department heads for additional information about cooperative education.

Pre-Law Study

Admission to law school is based primarily upon a student’s performance on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and cumulative grade point average. Tarleton offers both a BA and a BS in Political Science (Legal Studies Track), but a student may elect to take the LSAT and apply to law schools with any major offered at Tarleton. The LSAT covers three basic areas: logical reasoning, reading comprehension, and analytical reasoning. Students without a grounding in these areas have little chance of competing successfully for admission to selective law schools.

Students interested in preparing for the LSAT and law school are advised to consult the typical curriculum for their chosen degree and to consult Dr. Jeff Justice, the pre-law advisor, early in their undergraduate program.  For those not pursuing the BS or BA in Political Science (Legal Studies Track), the following courses are recommendations, not requirements, for solid pre-law preparation. These courses focus on various areas of public policy, legal processes, philosophy and logic, and communications skills. Students who plan to apply to law school should enroll in as many of these courses as possible. Students are particularly encouraged to focus on those courses listed below that fall within their major and/or minor fields of study.

Criminal Justice:
C J 232Criminal Procedure3
C J 235Criminal Investigation3
C J 237Fundament of Crim Law3
C J 308Comparative Crim Justice3
C J 315Criminal Evidence3
C J 340Homeland Security3
C J 412Criminal Justice Ethics3
Communications:
COMS 101Fund Spch Comm 13
COMS 102Public Speaking 13
COMS 303Debate3
COMS 304Interpers Comm3
Economics/Agricultural Economics:
ECO 401International Economics3
or A EC 402 International Economics
Environmental Engineering/Hydrology and Water Resources:
ENVE 430 [WI] Texas Water Resource Mgmt3
or HYDR 430 Tex Water Resource Mgmt
General Business:
G B 403Texas Real Estate Agency Law3
G B 406Texas Real Estate Contracts3
G B 407Real Estate Law3
G B 432Business Law I3
G B 433Business Law II3
G B 434Employment Law3
G B 444Intl Business3
G B 484International Business Law3
History:
HIST 412 [WI] Soc Hist Of The US Before 18653
HIST 413Soc Hist Of The US Since 18653
Management:
MGMT 320Industrial Safety3
or I T 320 Industrial Safety
MGMT 406Empl/Labor Rel3
MGMT 407 [WI] Business Ethics3
Philosophy:
PHIL 201Intro to Logic3
PHIL 301Ethics in the Professions3
Political Science:
POLS 303Comp State And Local Govt3
POLS 304The Executive3
POLS 305Legislation3
POLS 308 [WI] International Politics3
POLS 320Terrorism & Political Violence3
POLS 401 [WI] Const Law I3
POLS 402 [WI] Constitut Law II3
POLS 403Political Theory Through 17893
or PHIL 403 Political Theory Thru 1789
POLS 404Political Theory Since 17893
or PHIL 404 Political Theory Since 1789
POLS 410 [WI] Environmental Policy3
POLS 415Foreign Policy3
Social Work:
SWK 306 [WI] Social Welfare Policy3

For more information, contact Dr. Jeff Justice in the Department of Social Sciences.

1

 These courses meet general education requirements.

Pre-Theological Program

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree as preparation for entering a theological seminary will find that most programs for Master of Divinity and related degrees are based on the standards of the American Association of Theological Schools (AATS). These call for a heavy emphasis on the humanities, especially communication skills in written English and speech; basic knowledge of the past and present culture through history, sociology, philosophy, political science, literature, science, psychology, and related areas; and a foreign language. Of those languages offered at Tarleton, French or German is appropriate for those whose primary concern is scholarship; Spanish, for those planning a church ministry in the Southwest.

Some religious courses, such as those offered at religious centers at Tarleton, are valuable and usually taken by pre-ministerial students but the AATS discourages duplication of later work at the seminary. Although most seminaries accept candidates with a wide range of majors, the usual degrees for pre-seminary work are in such areas as English, communications, history, and sociology. Students planning to be candidates for seminary work need to check seminaries’ catalogs for special requirements.

Religion Studies

Religion Studies courses are offered on campus through the Department of Social Sciences.

Academic Support Services

Student Disability Services

Students with disabilities may request appropriate accommodation by contacting the Director of Student Disability Services at (254) 968-9400. Formal accommodation requests cannot be made until the student has been admitted to Tarleton. However, students are encouraged to make initial contact well in advance of this time to clarify documentation requirements and to allow time to arrange possible accommodations.

The policy of Tarleton State University is to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act and other federal, state, and local laws. Applicants for admission are not required to disclose disability status in the admission process. Information related to a disability that has been released to Student Disability Services is not used in the admission review process.

Tarleton Libraries

Tarleton Libraries offer information and research materials, personalized services, technological tools, and study/meeting spaces to support the educational, research, scholarship, and recreational needs of the entire University community. The libraries' resources and services can be accessed online at http://www.tarleton.edu/library and by visiting the libraries.

The Dick Smith Library, Tarleton's main library, is centrally located on the Stephenville campus. This library provides access to public computer workstations, in-house use of library laptops, scanners, wireless Internet access, and presentation tools. In addition, it offers group and individual study rooms and areas, an equipped presentation practice room, and meeting facilities that enhance study, group interaction, and information access. The Texan Hall library, Fort Worth Hickman campus, and the Medical Laboratory Sciences library, Fort Worth-Schaffer campus, provide users with targeted collections of resources, computer access, and printing capabilities. Free delivery of library materials is available via courier to all Tarleton satellite campuses.

Information and research offerings provided by Tarleton Libraries include print and electronic books (400,000+), periodicals (26,000+), government documents, audiovisual materials, microforms, and digital images. These materials can be readily located using the libraries’ online catalog. To further support users' research endeavors, Tarleton Libraries offer over 200 databases that provide online access to full-text articles and citations from thousands of scholarly and professional journals, trade publications, popular magazines, newspapers, and selected reference books.

Tarleton librarians and professional staff offer services and resources in person, by phone/email, and online to meet Tarleton community’s ever-changing needs. The libraries provide research and reference assistance, individual and group instruction sessions, online research guides and tutorials, and technical support. In addition, Dick Smith Library offers extended hours and interlibrary loan services that provide materials not available in the libraries’ collections. The libraries also provide document delivery for qualified distance online students. Furthermore the libraries’ participation in the TexShare consortium gives the University community privileges at most academic libraries in Texas.

Web Services

The mission of University Web Services is to develop and enhance Tarleton’s presence on the web and increase awareness of Tarleton through this media. Through the effective delivery of information and training, Web Services promotes the University to prospective students and provides information and services to current students, faculty, staff, and alumni.

Contact Web Services for help with gaining access to the web server and publishing a website. The online site at www.tarleton.edu/webservices also provides plenty of tutorials and resources on everything from publishing questions to links on useful graphics and software. Web Services is located on the third floor of the Dick Smith Library, Room 248.