Animal Science and Veterinary Technology

The Department of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology offers A Bachelor of Science in Animal Science with six Concentrations: Science (traditional Animal Science); Animal Production; Animal Industries; Pre-Veterinary Medicine Concentration; Food, Nutrition and Meat Applications; and Range Management.  Each concentration can be tailored to meet the career interests of individual students. The Equine Certificate Program provides additional emphasis for students interested in the equine industry regardless of concentration.  All students complete similar general education requirements, required by State and University regulations. In addition, the department also offers a Bachelor of Applied Science in Veterinary Technology. 

Historically, Tarleton has been known for its practical, hands-on approach to agricultural instruction. To allow for as much student exposure to real-life experiences as possible in an academic program, farm and ranch operations involving almost 2,000 acres of land and eight major teaching centers are utilized as agricultural laboratories. In addition to the animal facilities, several classrooms, indoor laboratories, two indoor-teaching pavilions, and an indoor equine arena are utilized in providing students with valuable “how-to-do” experiences.

1.     Bachelor of Science in Animal Science

a.     Science Concentration
This degree program provides a strong foundation in the scientific aspects (the "whys" and "hows") of animal production, nutrition, reproduction, anatomy, and physiology.  Supporting course work in chemistry, biology, and math provides students with background necessary to an understanding of the complex physiological and biological phenomena that explains why and how animals function and perform.

b.     Animal Production Concentration
This degree program stresses the practice "how-to" aspects of commercial livestock production with somewhat less emphasis on the "whys" and "hows" of animal physiology and biochemistry.  Animal Production is especially designed for students who expect and desire a career in the commercial production, marketing an/or promotion phases of a livestock industry.

c.     Animal Industries Concentration
The Animal Industries degree program offers students the combination of a strong foundation in animal science courses and basic business courses needed by graduates entering commercial and business enterprises related to animal agriculture.

d.     Pre-Veterinary Medicine Concentration
Students desiring to pursue a veterinary medicine career can complete, at Tarleton, all necessary prerequisites for application to the professional Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program at Texas A&M University and other professional veterinary medicine schools.  Acceptance into the DVM program is quite competitive, and pre-vet students are encouraged to work closely with their academic advisor in planning their individual programs of study.  The completed pre-vet curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science.

e.     Food, Nutrition and Meat Applications Concentration:  This concentration was developed for students interested meat science, food safety, food quality and nutrition.  The growing world population has dramatically increased the demand for graduates with an understanding of animal production and an emphasis on meat quality, food safety, and diet/nutrition. 

f.      Range and Ranch Management Concentration:  This concentration is similar to the Animal Production Concentration but provides students an additional emphasis in range production.  Students completing this concentration will have an understanding of animal production in range conditions typically found in the western U. S. 

2.     Bachelor of Applied Science in Veterinary Technology
The Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) in Veterinary Technology program continues to build upon the competencies learned by veterinary technicians holding an Associate's degree. Nursing care, surgical assistance, animal welfare, shelter medicine, forensics, and leadership roles are some of the core curriculums emphasized through companion animal, equine, and practice management clinical tracks.  Students completing the BAS program will be eligible to pursue their Master's degree or continue their passion to make a powerful impact in the lives of animals while playing a greater role in the delivery of veterinary services and specializations.  The BAS in Veterinary Technology is the vehicle to advance a veterinary technician’s careers, become a life-long learner, and open up other career opportunities.  Only students holding an Associate of Applied Science in Veterinary Technology are eligible to pursue this program.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Animal Science

Field of Study Courses
AGRI 1419General Animal Science4
ANSC 2101Animal Science Industry 1
ANSC 2350Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals3
ANSC 3408Physiology of Reproduction4
ANSC 3409Feeds and Feeding4
or ANSC 4306 Animal Nutrition
BIOL 3303
BIOL 3103
Genetics
and Genetic Techniques
4
or AGRI 3409 Genetics
ANSC 3421Meat Science4
ANSC 4300 [WI] Research and Writing in Animal Science3
Animal Production Elective - Choose six hours from the following:6
Sheep and Goat Production
Beef Cattle Production
Swine Production
Horse Enterprise Management
Sustainable Livestock Systems
Feeding and Management of Dairy Cattle
Big Game Ecology and Management
ANSC 4185Senior Seminar1
Other Required Courses
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS42
COMM 1315 [shared] Public Speaking
BIOL 1406 [shared] Biology for Science Majors
CHEM 1411 [shared] College Chemistry I
MATH (1314 or higher) - Pre-Vet students are required to take MATH 2412 [shared] 1
All Animal Science majors must complete the General Education requirements, the Animal Science FIeld of Study courses and one of the concentrations below to complete their degree program.
Total Hours76
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Science Concentration
These courses are in addition to general education requirements and Animal Science Field of Study
AGEC 2317 [shared] Introductory Agricultural Economics
BIOL 1407Biology for Science Majors II4
CHEM 1412College Chemistry II4
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I4
CHEM 2425Organic Chemistry II4
BIOL 3407Microbiology4
Advanced BIOL or CHEM 4
MATH 1342Elementary Statistical Methods3
or MATH 3450 Principles of Bio-Statistics
ANSC 3319Animal Breeding3
Advanced electives 5
ANSC Lower Level Electives (may also use AGRI 1311 as a lower level elective)6
Writing Intensive Requirement - Choose 1 from the following:3
Agricultural Sales and Services
Business Communication
Technical writing and Document Design
Total Hours44
Animal Production Concentration
These courses are in addition to general education requirements and Animal Science Field of Study
AGEC 2317 [shared] Introductory Agricultural Economics
WSES 1305Fundamentals of Crop Science3
ANSC 3319Animal Breeding3
ANSC 4084Internship3
AGRI 2330Elementary Wildlife Management for Non-majors3
or RNRM 3301 Principles of Range Management
ANSC Lower Level Electives (may also use AGRI 1311 as a lower level elective)6
Advanced business electives: ACCT, ADMS, BCIS, ECON, FINC, BUSI, MGMT, REST, BLAW, MKTG6
Advanced electives17
Writing Intensive Requirement - Choose 1 from the following:3
Agricultural Sales and Services
Business Communication
Technical writing and Document Design
Total Hours44
Animal Industries Concentration
These courses are in addition to general education requirements and Animal Science Field of Study
AGEC 2317 [shared] Introductory Agricultural Economics
ECON 2301Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON 2302Principles of Microeconomics3
ACCT 2301Principles of Accounting I-Financial3
ACCT 2302Principles of Accounting II-Managerial3
or AGSD 2311 Applied Agricultural Analysis
AGEC 3330Agricultural Credit 33
AGEC 3314The Agricultural Marketing System 33
AGEC 3317Agricultural Statistics 33
ANSC 4084Internship3
ANSC Lower Level Electives (may also use AGRI 1311 as a lower level elective)6
Advanced electives11
Writing Intensive Requirement - Choose 1 from the following:3
Agricultural Sales and Services
Business Communication
Technical writing and Document Design
Total Hours44
Pre-Veterinary Medicine Concentration
These courses are in addition to general education requirements and Animal Science Field of Study
PSYC 2301 [shared] General Psychology
BIOL 1407Biology for Science Majors II4
BIOL 3407Microbiology4
CHEM 1412College Chemistry II4
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I4
CHEM 2425Organic Chemistry II4
BIOL 4374Biochemistry I3
or CHEM 4374 Biochemistry I
Advanced BIOL/CHEM Elective4
PHYS 1401College Physics I4
PHYS 1402College Physics II4
MATH 3450Principles of Bio-Statistics4
ENGL 3309 [WI] Technical writing and Document Design3
ENGL 2XXX [Shared with Language, Philosophy and Culture General Education Requirement]
Advanced Elective2
Total Hours44
Food, Nutrition and Meat Applications
These courses are in addition to general education requirements and Animal Science Field of Study
AGEC 2317 [shared] Introductory Agricultural Economics
BIOL 1407Biology for Science Majors II4
BIOL 2420Microbiology for Non-Science Majors4
CHEM 1412College Chemistry II4
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I4
ANSC 4312Meat Processing and Merchandising3
ANSC 4314Food Quality Assurance3
ANSC 4338Value-Added Processed Meats3
Concentration Electives (At least 8 hours must be upper level)16
Beef Cattle Production
Swine Production
Laboratory Topics in Animal and Food Science
Concepts and Controversies in Food Studies
Food Preparation and Meal Management
Nutrition and Diet Therapy
Food Processing
Life Cycle Nutrition
Advanced Meal Management
Food and Culture
Sustainable Food Systems
Aquaponics
Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources
Fermentation and Brewing
Vegetable Production
Organic Agriculture
Crop Production and Management
Business Communication
Business Statistics
Global Business Practices
Marketing
Consumer Behavior
Sales Management
Supply Chain and Logistics Concepts
Writing Intensive Requirement - Choose 1 from the following:3
Agricultural Sales and Services
Business Communication
Technical writing and Document Design
Total Hours44
Range and Ranch Management
These courses are in addition to general education requirements and Animal Science Field of Study
AGEC 2317 [shared] Introductory Agricultural Economics
CHEM 1412College Chemistry II4
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I4
WSES 1305Fundamentals of Crop Science3
RNRM 3300Rangeland and Forest Plants3
RNRM 3301Principles of Range Management3
RNRM 3315Range Ecology3
WSES 3401 [WI] Soils4
WSES 3412Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification4
WSES 2301General Entomology3
or BIOL 2420 Microbiology for Non-Science Majors
BIOL 3415Plant Taxonomy4
BIOL 3436Plant Physiology4
RNRM 4312Range Improvement and Development3
ANSC 4086Animal Science Problems2
Total Hours44
1

 Pre-Veterinary Medicine students are required to take MATH 2412.

2

 Students who choose to take ANSC 4306 Animal Nutrition will be required to complete 1 additional advanced credit hour in order to meet the 120 hour requirement.

3

 Or equivalent.

Certificate in Equine Science

Field of Study Courses
Select 6 credits from the following courses:6
Horse Psychology and Training
Equine Behavior Modification
Equine Evaluation
Equine Exercise Physiology and Conditioning
Basic Equine and Assisted Therapy
Advanced Equine Assisted Therapy
Special Topics
Other Required Courses
ANSC 1310Introduction to Horse Management3
ANSC 1309Introduction to Horse Production3
ANSC 3324Horse Nutrition3
ANSC 3410Principles of Equine Reproduction4
ANSC 4330Horse Enterprise Management3
Total Hours22

**NOTE:  Some of the courses within the Equine Certificate may require other course prerequisites.** 

The Bachelor of Applied Science Degree in Veterinary Technology

Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
Associate's Degree in Veterinary Technology36
VETE 3112Strengths Based Leadership1
VETE 3313Radiology & Clinical Imaging3
VETE 3316Clinical Cardiology3
VETE 4111Safety & Regulatory Compliance1
VETE 4305Pharmacology & Pharmacy3
VETE 4313Animal Welfare & Ethics3
VETE 4208 [WI] Veterinary Research 2
VETE 4209 [WI] Veterinary Technology: Capstone2
Advanced VETE Electives6
Total Hours102
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Companion Animal
VETE 4321Companion Animal Diseases & Health Management3
VETE 4323Companion Animal Nutrition & Care3
VETE 4325Companion Animal Anesthesiology & Surgical Nursing3
VETE 4326Companion Animal Emergency-Critical Care & Pain Management3
Electives: Choose 6 hours from the following:6
Companion Animal Dermatology
Companion Animal Ophthalmology
Integrative Medicine
Dental Procedures & Techniques
Shelter Animal Medicine I
Shelter Animal Medicine II
Shelter Animal Medicine III
Veterinary Forensics I
Veterinary Forensics II
Veterinary Forensics III
Total Hours18
Equine
VETE 4331Equine Disease & Health Management3
VETE 4333Equine Nutrition & Care3
VETE 4335Equine Anesthesiology & Surgical Nursing3
VETE 4337Equine Colic3
Electives: Choose 6 hours from the following:6
Equine Lameness & Treatment Modalities
Equine Forensics: Cruelty
Emergency & Critical Care of Horses
Equine Dermatology & Ophthalmology
Equine Learning & Behavior
Total Hours18
Veterinary Practice
VETE 4351Veterinary Practice: Administration and Organization 3
VETE 4352Veterinary Practice: Fiscal Analysis and Planning 3
VETE 4354Veterinary Practice: Client/Consumer Behavior and Practice Branding3
VETE 4355Veterinary Practice: Supervision and Leadership3
Electives: Choose 6 hours from the following:6
Veterinary Practice: Law & Ethics I
Veterinary Practice: Law & Ethics II
Veterinary Practice: Administrative Tools for Success
Veterinary Practice: Teaching Techniques
Veterinary Practice Management Internship
Total Hours18

Animal Science Courses

ANSC 1100. Transitioning to University Studies in Animal Sciences. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, aid in the development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, and encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective.

ANSC 1105. Introduction to Veterinary/Medical Terminology. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an entry level introduction to veterinary/medical terminology. The foundation of veterinary terminologies and medical language roots, prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms are covered along with musculo-skeletal and dissection/spatial body positions. Course is offered entirely online.

ANSC 1202. Barbeque Science. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 2 Hours).

An introduction to the science of meat preparation, incorporating food quality and safety, ingredients and flavors, cooking techniques, cut selection and consumer preferences. Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 1250. Rodeo Techniques. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 2 Hours).

Skill development in all standard events will be emphasized, with special attention to student needs. Students must be members of the Tarleton varsity rodeo team. Credits may substitute for required KINE only and may be repeated. Prerequisite: approval of rodeo coach.

ANSC 1309. Introduction to Horse Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An introduction to some of the fundamental aspects of horse production, including health, genetics and disease, nutrition, reproduction, and exercise physiology.

ANSC 1310. Introduction to Horse Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An introduction to fundamental aspects of horse management, including the status of the equine industry. Other topics include functional anatomy, locomotion, identification, equine behavior in relation to modification to training, health care management and stable management. Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 1320. Rodeo Production and Skills. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

A study of rodeo activities including organization, promotion, and management of rodeos. Skill development in all standard events will be emphasized with special attention to student needs. Lab fee $10.

ANSC 2101. Animal Science Industry. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of the Animal Science industry, its challenges and recent trends as they affect entering students and their career plans and preparations. Prerequisites: Must be an ANSC major and must have completed AGRI 1419 or equivalent.

ANSC 2303. Basic Horsemanship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 4 Hours).

Instruction and practice of basic horsemanship skills. Focus will be on the proper use of feet, seat, hands and legs to provide the horse with the correct stimulus to perform basic maneuvers. Criteria from the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association Instructor Certification Exam will be presented. Prerequisite: ANSC 1309. Lab fee $5.

ANSC 2305. Horse Handling Techniques. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Skills development in basic horse handling and application of general principles of equine psychology and behavior. Students will be assigned a young horse to halter train for fundamental groundwork. Prerequisite: instructor approval Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 2307. Meat Animal Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Evaluation of market animals including beef cattle, swine, sheep and goats. Emphasis is on selection of breeding animals and evaluation of market animals and economically important characteristics for each species. Prerequisite: AGRI 1419.

ANSC 2308. Meat and Carcass Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Evaluation of meat cuts and carcasses from cattle, swine, sheep and goats. Emphasis is on factors affecting quality and yield for each species. Techniques for evaluation and for preparation of written reasons. This course is required for participation in the meat judging program, but is open to all students meeting the prerequisites. Prerequisite: AGRI 1419.

ANSC 2310. Introduction to Veterinary Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to veterinary science including structure and function of major body systems, nutrition, diseases, and surgical principles. Both farm animals and companion animals will be discussed. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319.

ANSC 2315. Principles of Farrier Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 6 Hours).

Application of the scientific fundamentals of hoof care. Topics include locomotion analysis, biomechanics, hoof trimming and horseshoeing. This course is not intended to turn out professional horseshoers. It is intended to provide information to the student so that they can understand what can and can’t be accomplished by a competent farrier. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ANSC 2350. Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to comparative anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. The roles of the various systems of the animal body will be studied with practical applications made to animal production. Topics include anatomy and physiology of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, pulmonary, digestive and reproductive systems. Prerequisites: AGRI 1419 with a C or better and sophomore classification.

ANSC 3301. Livestock Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Application of animal handling and management techniques for livestock. A study of the principles of breeding, feeding, disease and parasite control for beef, sheep, goats and swine. Prerequisites: AGRI 1419. Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 3305. Equine Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

A Study of the influence of heredity, conformation, training and environmental effects on performance. A detailed evaluation of the athletic performance and conformation as it relates to function, and the criteria used for evaluation and selection of breeding, race and performance animals. Prerequisite: ANSC 1310.

ANSC 3307. Livestock and Meat Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Comparative evaluation of breeding and market animals with emphasis on live animal selection, official carcass grading, carcass contest, wholesale cut selection and pricing, and performance testing. Oral reasons and written justifications on placing classes will be emphasized. Prerequisite: AGRI 1325 or approval of department head and instructor. Lab fee $2.

ANSC 3313. Sheep and Goat Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Practical applications of breeding, feeding, management, disease and parasite control with regard to range and farm conditions; fitting and showing. Wool and mohair production; grading; sorting; and marketing. Prerequisite: AGRI 1419. Lab fee $2.

ANSC 3315. Animal Diseases and Parasites. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Diseases of farm animals, both infectious and non-infectious, parasites, parasitic diseases. Disease and parasite prevention through sanitation, treatment of animal diseases. CREDIT FOR ANSC 3315 & VETE 3315 WILL NOT BE AWARDED. Prerequisite: Junior classification or approval of Department head. Lab fee $2.

ANSC 3319. Animal Breeding. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Specialized study of the application of genetic principles to livestock breeding. Improvement of the economic traits of farm animals by utilizing the principles of heritability and selection. Breeding and selection systems in cattle, swine, sheep, and horse production. Prerequisites: AGRI 3409, or BIOL 3303 and BIOL 3103, or BIOL 3403, or equivalent.

ANSC 3323. Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will examine the several major ethical issues facing agriculture and natural resources sciences in our current society. Readings, discussions and lectures will focus on the scientific, capitalistic, and philosophical motivation in common ethical issues. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to construct and dissect ethical arguments and hopefully become more aware of the ethical dilemmas we all face each day.

ANSC 3325. Equine Exercise Physiology and Conditioning. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Studies of the influence of training and conditioning on muscle physiology, cardiovascular physiology, the biomechanics of locomotion, and energy utilization. This course is designed for students primarily interested in training and recreational riding. Students will receive training and experience in evaluating and monitoring the levels of conditioning in horses. Fundamental rehabilitation and treatment of sports injuries will be included. Prerequisite: Junior classification; ANSC 1309 with a C or higher; ANSC 4305 or equivalent Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 3326. Horse Psychology and Training. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Principles of equine behavior, breaking and training young horses, and training technique. Prerequisites: junior classification and instructor approval Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 3330. Basic Equine and Assisted Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 4 Hours).

Study and application of the methods of using the horse in a therapy program. Guidelines from the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association. Students will gain practical experience in the development and conduct of an equine-assisted therapy program. Prerequisite: approval of department head.

ANSC 3331. Advanced Equine Assisted Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 4 Hours).

Advanced studies in the use of the horse in a therapeutic riding program. Students will gain the hands-on experience and the information about riding, instruction and safety necessary to become a Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor with the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association. Prerequisites: ANSC 1309, 3330, and approval of the instructor.

ANSC 3335. Equine Behavior Modification. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Application of the principles of equine psychology to train young horses. Prerequisites: junior classification, ANSC 3323 and permission of instructor Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 3350. Stockhorse Techniques. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Skills development in horsemanship and techniques related to western stockhorse events. Introduction to a variety of western stockhorse disciplines and rules and regulations specific to competitions. Prerequisites: ANSC 1309; instructor approval Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 3399. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 3-9 Hours).

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to integrate academic study with work experience that is germane to their major or minor. Enrollment requires a two-semester minimum commitment that may be accomplished by 1) alternating semesters of full-time study with semesters of curriculum-related employment, or 2) enrolling in courses at least half-time (6 semester hours) and working part-time in parallel positions of curriculum-related employment. The department Cooperative Education advisor will supervise the student's experience and assign the final grade based on the student's final report which is required to complete the course. Students may participate in the Cooperative Education program for an unlimited number of semesters but a maximum of 6 hours credit may be counted toward a degree. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 semester hours which includes 12 hours in the major or minor discipline in which the Cooperative Education course is desired, minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the appropriate major or minor field, and department head approval. Field experience fee $50.

ANSC 3408. Physiology of Reproduction. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Breeding efficiency of cattle, sheep, swine, and horses. Study includes the anatomy and physiology of the male and female reproductive tracts, hormones directly controlling reproduction, estrus and estrous cycles, ovulation, mating, gestation, pregnancy tests, parturition, sperm physiology, semen evaluation, collection and storage of semen, and the primary causes of sterility in males and females. CREDIT FOR BOTH ANSC 3408 & VETE 3408 WILL NOT BE AWARDED. Prerequisites: AGRI 1419 and junior classification. Lab fee $2.

ANSC 3409. Feeds and Feeding. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Study of principal feeds and feed-stuffs from a practical point of view. Feeding standards and calculation of rations for maintenance, growth, fattening, and for milk, wool, and egg production. Prerequisite: Junior classification and AGRI 1419 with a C or better. Lab fee $2.

ANSC 3410. Principles of Equine Reproduction. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Application of fundamental concepts and principles of equine genetics, breeding and reproduction. Prerequisites: ANSC 1309 OR equivalent, ANSC 4330 OR equivalent Lab fee $15.

ANSC 3421. Meat Science. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Study of the science and physical processes involved in converting selected farm animals into marketable products. Particular attention will be given to the anatomy and nomenclature of meats, sanitation practices, and evaluation. Various techniques used by commercial establishments will be accentuated in the study of meat processing. Prerequisites: AGRI 1419 and junior classification, or approval of instructor.

ANSC 3424. Equine Nutrition. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The course will include a detailed examination of the unique anatomy and physiology of the digestive system of the horse. Dietary requirements of the six classes of nutrients will be covered in detail as well as the major sources, needs, functions, and physiological aspects of inadequate and excess intake of nutrients. Common feedstuffs and their use in formulating equine rations will be covered and ration evaluation will be introduced. Feeding programs and practical feeding management of several different classes of horses will be presented. Prerequisite: ANSC 1309 with a C or higher; BIOL 1406; CHEM 1407 or CHEM 1411; junior classification Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 4084. Internship. 3,6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 24 Hours, Lab: 48 Hours).

Formally arranged and approved on-the-job training with cooperating sponsor in a commercial or private sector of the livestock or meats industries. A minimum of 40 hours of training is required for each hour of academic credit. A maximum of six hours credit may be earned by internship completion. Oral and written reports of internship experience required. Prerequisite: Advanced standing and approval of department head.

ANSC 4086. Animal Science Problems. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-4 Hours).

Individualized study of current topics in student's major concentration of study or supporting discipline. Specific content and credit dependent upon student's interest, needs, and depth of study. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours credit. Prerequisite: Senior classification and advance approval by academic advisor.

ANSC 4185. Senior Seminar. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

A review of current problems and developments in agriculture; professional opportunities and responsibilities; individual investigations and reports. Prerequisite: Senior classification.

ANSC 4300. Research and Writing in Animal Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Detailed discussions and literature review of current knowledge in areas such as reproductive and alimentary physiology, nutrition, parasitology, pharmacology, and genetics. Topics will include experimental design and statistical evaluation of agricultural research. Students will prepare various types of writings based on scientific literature. Prerequisite: senior classification in agriculture.

ANSC 4303. Beef Cattle Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Beef cattle industry, principles involved in breeding, feeding, management, disease and parasite control, and marketing analysis of ranch and feed lot systems. Prerequisite: Junior classification, AGRI 1419 with a C or better, CHEM 1407 or 1411, and BIOL 1406 or 1407. Lab fee $9.

ANSC 4306. Animal Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The animal body, its composition and food, some physiochemical bases of life processes; digestion, composition, metabolism, and functions of feeds and nutrients; vitamins, inorganic elements, and metabolism; growth, reproduction, lactation. CREDIT FOR ANSC 4306 & VETE 4306 WILL NOT BE AWARDED. Prerequisite: CHEM 2423 or approval of instructor.

ANSC 4308. Environmental Physiology of Farm Animals. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Studies of farm animals and interactions with their physical environment. Detailed attention is given to the effects of changes and extremes in natural and artificial animal environments, including temperatures, shelter, altitude, humidity, crowding, and other stress factors associated with modern livestock production and handling practices. Prerequisites: AGRI 1319 with a C or better, ANSC 4305 and senior classification or approval of instructor.

ANSC 4310. Swine Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Applications of breeding, feeding, housing, sanitation, and disease control. Analysis of herd records. Prerequisite: Junior classification, AGRI 1419 with a C or better, CHEM 1407 or 1411, BIOL 1406 or 1407. Lab fee $8.

ANSC 4312. Meat Processing and Merchandising. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The chemical and physical characteristics of meats and their relations to the processing and manufacturing of meat food items. Carcass value as influenced by merchandising techniques and practices. Sanitation control and commercial and retail operations will be stressed. Laboratory work will include meat processing and the development of competencies in processing all classes of livestock. Prerequisite: ANSC 3421 or approval of department head. Lab fee $10.

ANSC 4314. Food Quality Assurance. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The basis behind food quality control/assurance is discussed along with its application to various food systems to control and improve the quality and safety of our food supply. Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 4330. Horse Enterprise Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Individualized instruction in management techniques for horse enterprises. Record systems, marketing, and business operation procedures. Prerequisites: Senior classification in ANSC, ANSC 1309 and approval of instructor.

ANSC 4338. Value-Added Processed Meats. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The application of scientific principles and practices to further processed meat products. Interrelationships among tissue characteristics, ingredients, handling practices, processing technologies and storage conditions as they affect the quality, safety, and stability of muscle foods. Prerequisite: ANSC 3421 Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 4350. Feed Analysis. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 4 Hours).

Analytical techniques for determining the nutrient content of animal feeds. Students will learn to measure moisture, protein, fiber, carbohydrates, fats, and minerals. Different methods for estimating the useable energy content of feeds will be presented. Prerequisite: CHEM 1412 or approval of department head.

ANSC 4358. Laboratory Topics in Animal and Food Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 4 Hours).

Individualized instruction in laboratory analytical procedures, techniques, and instrumentation commonly used in animal and food sciences. Topics involve various aspects of analysis techniques associated with nutrition, reproduction, breeding, physiology, and meats and dairy-products processing. May be repeated once when topics vary. Lab fee $20. Students may also need to purchase appropriate personal articles such as protective apparel.

ANSC 4390. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Selected topics in the animal sciences. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, with a maximum of six hours. Prerequisite: approval of department head.

ANSC 4401. Ethology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

An introductory course in the behavior of animals, with emphasis on the natural selection, ontogeny, and function of behaviors as they relate to feeding, reproduction, predator-avoidance, and other traits. Both proximate (sensory, hormonal, genetic) and ultimate (ecological and evolutionary) mechanisms are addressed. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 1406 and BIOL 1407, and a C or better in either AGRI 1419 or WSES 2322. Lab fee: $2.

ANSC 4440. Sustainable Livestock Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Overview of beef, dairy, swine, small ruminant and poultry production systems and their applications. Modern concepts, ideas, and methodology associated with the application of technology to reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition and nutrient utilization, across various management schemes. Prerequisite: ANSC 3319, ANSC 3408, and either ANSC 3409 or ANSC 4306.

Veterinary Technology Courses

VETE 1101. Introduction to Veterinary Technology. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an overview of the roles, functions, career opportunitites, responsibilties, and contributions that veterinary technologists bring to veterinary medicine and other animal care and research disciplines.

VETE 3112. Strengths Based Leadership. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course focuses on the theories, concepts and principles of leadership. Emphasis will be on the development of leadership skills through the four domains of leadership strength: Executing, Influencing, Relationship Building, and Stategic Thinking. Prerequisites: Enrollment in Veterinary Technology program or permission of program director.

VETE 3201. Radiology/Imaging I. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Radiology I teaches veterinary technician students the fundamentals of taking and developing radiographs. Topics include positioning, how radiographs are generated, fundamentals of film processing, radiographic techniques and quality, and radiation safety procedures. Other imaging technologies include ultrasound, fluoroscopy, MRI, CT scan, and nuclear scintigraphy. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program.

VETE 3313. Radiology & Clinical Imaging. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course teaches veterinary technician students beyond the fundamentals of taking and developing radiographs. Topics include descriptive positioning, digital radiographic techniques and quality calculations, and radiation safety procedures. Other imaging technologies include ultrasound, fluoroscopy, MRI, CT scan, and nuclear scintigraphy. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 3317. Veterinary Microbiology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to present a very broad spectrum of veterinary microbiology and infectious diseases. Animal disease etiologies and their differentiating signalment that occur in North America, as well as some global trans-boundary disease content, is emphasized and included. A systematic approach of describing infection and disease states is utilized to compare differences and similarities across many affected species. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the BAS Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4086. Veterinary Technology Special Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours). [WI]

This is an advanced course in veterinary technology. Problems assigned according to experience, interest, and needs of individual students. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4111. Safety & Regulatory Compliance. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will introduce and heighten awareness of veterinary specific safety hazards and regulatory compliance issues. The course is designed to acquaint veterinary technician learners to the following: (1) personal safety hazards, (2) patient safety hazards, (3) Human Resource issues related to safety, (4) licenses, permits, and registrations, (5) Occupational and Safety Health Administration (OSHA), and (6) reproductive and gender issues. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4163. Shelter Animal Medicine I. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will learn to evaluate and modify protocols to enhance the physical health and well-being of sheltered dogs and cats as well as recognize and respond to common threats to physical health. Students will explore medical concepts related to population management, sanitation, facility design, and animal housing.

VETE 4164. Shelter Animal Medicine II. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will learn to manage infectious disease outbreaks common to the shelter setting, as well as address animal cruelty in multiple species. Prerequisite: VETE 4163.

VETE 4165. Shelter Animal Medicine III. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Evaluate the quality of a shelter's behavioral health programs and implement changes to promote welfare and placement of sheltered dogs and cats. Investigate critical shelter animal behavior and welfare concepts including behavioral assessments, behavioral modification protocols, diagnosis of common behavioral problems, and medical treatments of selected behavioral disorders. Address spay/neuter protocols and in shelters. Prerequisites: VETE 4163 and VETE 4164.

VETE 4166. Veterinary Forensics I. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Understand the procedures and protocols used when processing an animal crime scene. Understanding the legal system and the role and responsibility of the veterinarian.

VETE 4167. Veterinary Forensics II. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will focus on the examination of the animal, as well as special considerations for animal cruelty, postmortem changes, and forensic entomology. Prerequisite: VETE 4166.

VETE 4168. Veterinary Forensics III. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course allows students to explore various areas of trauma and injury that can occur in forensics, such as: blunt force trauma, sharp force injury, burn-, electrical-, and fire-related injuries, and firearm injuries. Prerequisites: VETE 4166 and VETE 4167.

VETE 4181. Veterinary Practice: Law & Ethics I. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This first course in veterinary law & ethics is designed to provide students with an understanding of the legal principles required by State and National licensing boards within the scope of veterinary practices. Emphasis is placed on the principles and policies which veterinarians and technicians receive through continuing education in order to maintain licensure. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4182. Veterinary Practice: Law & Ethics II. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This second in a series course in veterinary law & ethics is designed to provide students with a continuing understanding of the legal principles required by State and National licensing boards within the scope of veterinary practices. Emphasis is placed on the principles and policies which veterinarians and technicians receive through continuing education in order to maintain licensure. Prerequisite: VETE 4181.

VETE 4208. Veterinary Research. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course is collectively designed to provide veterinary technology students an introduction to biomedical research and career opportunities in veterinary medicine. It is centered on supporting veterinarian technicians who are seeking to develop their scientific knowledge and research skills. Unmet needs for veterinary technician expertise exist in sectors of veterinary medicine, such as Biomedical Genomics, Genetics and Bioinformatics, Physiology, Pharmacology, Cardiovascular Sciences, Infectious Diseases, Biodefense and Immunology, Neuroscience, Anatomy and Functional Imaging, Reproductive Biology, Development and Epigenetics, Toxicology, Environmental Health Science, and Food Safety. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the BAS Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4209. Veterinary Technology: Capstone. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

The capstone course is an opportunity for students to demonstrate achievement of the goals for learning established by the Veterinary Technology Program . The course is designed to assess cognitive, affective and psychomotor learning and to do so in a student-centered and student-directed manner which requires the command, analysis and synthesis of knowledge and writing skills. The capstone course integrates learning from the courses within the major and the academic experience. This course is highly recommended to be taken in the last semester. Prerequisites: VETE 4208, recommended as the last course, enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program, upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4251. Veterinary Practice: Administrative Tools for Success. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course outlines time tested tools and systems for improving a veterinary practice manager's administrative skills and performance standards. The mind-set need to achieve an important goal is studied through discussions that mark and define progress and setting achievable goals; success mapping! Prerequisite: Enrollment in the BAS Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4252. Veterinary Practice: Teaching Techniques. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course explores the development and delivery of front office skills, etiquette and medical practices required of veterinary technicians in carrying out their profession. A wide variety of models and exemplars focus on the integration of client, medical supplier, veterinary resources and supportive biomedical technologies that contribute to the veterinary practice and profession. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the BAS Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4259. Companion Animal Dermatology. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will cover the presentation, recognition and diagnostics necessary to identify skin diseases and provide clinical guidelines for the successful management of skin diseases commonly seen in veterinary practice. Consideration of the diagnostic approach toward the dermatology patient, precancerous conditions, zoonoses, and breed predispositions are examined along with dermatologic drugs and toxicities. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4260. Companion Animal Ophthalmology. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines clinical canine/feline ophthalmology. Coverage of the most commonly diagnosed and treated neuro-ophthalmology and systemic diseases afflicting the eye are considered. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the BAS Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4262. Dental Procedures & Techniques. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course covers the 12-step dental cleaning procedure, oral pathology, instrumentation used in cleaning, equipment, dental radiology, interpretation of dental radiographs. digital dental radiography systems, utilization of digital systems to promote client acceptance of treatment plans, dental charting, and implementing a higher level of dental care in a general practice. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4270. Integrative Medicine. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A holistic approach to examination, diagnosis and treatment modalities of an animal, taking into consideration all aspects of the animal's life and focusing on culturally-alternative aspects of treatment. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4271. Equine Lameness & Treatment Modalities. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course analyzes the causes, diagnoses, and management of the myriad causes of lameness such as: defining and identifying the lame leg; spotting gait abnormalities and non-muscular causes; physical examinations and evaluations; diagnostic tools and other tests; the role of the veterinarian and farrier in pre-purchase examinations. Physical therapies along with treatment of specific conditions to the foot, pastern and fetlock, cannon and splint bones, knee, upper foreleg, hock, upper hind leg, and back are studied. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4272. Equine Forensics: Cruelty. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course focuses on assessment and investigation into large animal (equine) cruelty cases. It covers and describes methods for assessing starvation, body condition scoring, hoof care, dental care, and accidental and non-accidental injuries. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4273. Emergency & Critical Care of Horses. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course addresses the role of veterinary technicians in equine emergency and critical care. It covers and describes dozens of common, life-saving protocols and procedures. Patient assessment, equipment, therapies and techniques are discussed along with important drug information. Specific systemic problems such as hematologic, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal emergencies, shock and trauma are covered. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4274. Equine Dermatology & Ophthalmology. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course describes the structure and function of the skin, and discusses disorders including bacterial, fungal, parasitic, viral, protozoal, allergic, immune-mediated, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases. It also covers congenital and hereditary defects, pigmentation abnormalities, keratinization defects, environmental skin diseases, and skin tumors. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4275. Equine Learning & Behavior. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course explains learning theory, and offers practical advice on reward systems, positive and negative reinforcement, and overcoming fears and phobias. and how to apply it in a way that is both efficient and holds the horse’s welfare paramount. It also a range of practical tools to employ in solving equine behaviour problems, and training tasks and case studies demonstrate these tools in use. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4283. Veterinary Practice Management Internship. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The Technician Manager Internship is designed to expose students to the daily practice-management activities that may be encountered in a veterinary practice, an animal research facility, or other allied animal-health facility. A minimum of 480 hours of participation in a veterinary manager internship position in a faculty-approved facility is required. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4302. Advanced Veterinary Terminology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course expands on the basics of VETE 1103 Words for each system of the body will be mastered as well as knowledge of abbreviations used in pharmacology, record keeping and laboratory testing. Students will achieve mastery of concepts through completion of exams and written assignments requiring use of the terminology. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director, VETE 1103.

VETE 4305. Pharmacology & Pharmacy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course deals with pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical/therapeutic uses and toxicology of drugs. Emphasis is given on how a drug works to anticipate outcomes. Nursing responsibilities include administering drugs, calculating medication dosages based on given setting, assessing drug effects, intervening to make a drug more tolerable, and providing teaching about drugs and the drug regimen. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4313. Animal Welfare & Ethics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Course content includes and focuses on the ethics of animal use, physiological and psychological aspects of adverse states, examination of animal environments, the role of the veterinarian and the profession in in animal welfare, knowledge and understanding of welfare issues, animal legislation and cruelty law, and further characterization and understanding of the human - animal bond. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4321. Companion Animal Diseases & Health Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will focus on the nursing care required by companion animals as the result of disease or neonatal, geriatric, and obstetrical needs. The course objectives are to assess a student's knowledge base and then help him or her gain the knowledge to maintain the health, well-being, and longevity of companion animals. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director .

VETE 4323. Companion Animal Nutrition & Care. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Companion Animal Nutrition covers the essentials of nutrition and delves into energy and requirements. It examines the regulation of pet foods, ingredients, pet food labels and guaranteed analysis. It focuses on feeding management of pets for their entire lifecycle and in instances of disease and debilitating injury. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4325. Companion Animal Anesthesiology & Surgical Nursing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides detailed coverage of the physiological, pharmacological and physical aspects of anesthesia. Detailed case study is utilized to build knowledge and understanding of anesthetic principles. Nursing skills are given emphasis toward pre- and post operative procedures.Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4326. Companion Animal Emergency-Critical Care & Pain Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will focus on learning and applying emergency care, critical care and pain management techniques appropriate for veterinary technicians. The student will acquire knowledge of the proper use of drugs, fluids, and equipment for emergency and critical care patients. Students will also learn to evaluate these patients through physiological monitoring and life support measures in the intensive care unit (ICU). Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4331. Equine Disease & Health Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a comprehensive study of the essential elements necessary to promote goo health among horses. Living environments, fencing, pasture, grooming, vaccination protocols, de-worming protocols, hoof care, dental care, etc. are addressed and discussed through case scenarios and models. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4333. Equine Nutrition & Care. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides in-depth information on the function and peculiarities of equine gastrointestinal physiology and the importance of the nutrients that are essential for equine well-being. In addition to discussions of common feeds and supplement, topics will include how to read and interpret commercial feed labels, the balancing of rations, and the use of feed analyses and computer analysis programs. Course content is presented entirely online. Prerequsites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4335. Equine Anesthesiology & Surgical Nursing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides detailed coverage of the physiological, pharmacological and physical aspects of anesthesia. Detailed case study is utilized to build knowledge and understanding of anesthetic principles. Nursing skills are given emphasis toward pre- and post operative procedures. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4337. Equine Colic. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course explores the various etiologies and physiological responses of horse that are afflicted with gastrointestinal insufficiency. Each of the 5 main causative factors of equine colic are discussed and evaluated for health implications and measures necessary for a return to uncomplicated recovery. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4351. Veterinary Practice: Administration and Organization. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Designed for veterinary technicians, this course explores the decision making responsibility within a veterinary practice environment in which to improve its competitive advantage. This course examines how the long-term organizational success of veterinary services can be achieved through effective policies and operating procedures. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the BAS Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4352. Veterinary Practice: Fiscal Analysis and Planning. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines the specific financials of veterinary practice and statement analysis that are one of the most challenging areas for practice managers. Also covered are facility additions/improvements, equipment, vehicles, and other capital expenditures that requires the practice manager to proactively conduct a thorough analysis of projected client (statement) income and projections to facilitate sound decision making. Also, under consideration are the variable pricing models - veterinary hospitals have a number of potential pricing models to choose from when setting fees. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the BAS Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4354. Veterinary Practice: Client/Consumer Behavior and Practice Branding. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will explore the veterinary practice manager's role in facilitating client education directed at the health care needs of their animals' and insuring for health care needs while growing the practice through internal and external promotions and educational programs. This course also examines veterinary wellness and preventative health care plans as well as communicating the benefits of product, place, price, promotion and branding. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the BAS Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4355. Veterinary Practice: Supervision and Leadership. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to identify key interpersonal relationships in veterinary practice that leaders must foster and develop for long term success. Supervision in large and small practices; consisting of administrative, technical and support staff is also covered. A discussion planner (tool) for veterinary technicians/managers to develop interdependency, trust and effective communication will be utilized. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the BAS Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

VETE 4361. Companion Animal Emergency & Critical Care. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will focus on learning and applying emergency and critical care techniques appropriate for veterinary technicians. The student will acquire knowledge of the proper use of drugs, fluids, and equipment for emergency and critical care patients. Students will also learn to evaluate these patients through monitoring and life support measures in the intensive care unit (ICU). Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Veterinary Technology Program and upper division standing or approval of the Director.

Dr. Frank Owsley
Department of Animal Science and Veterinary Technology
Joe W. Autry Agriculture Building, Room 116
Box T-0070
Stephenville, Texas 76402
(254) 968-9222
(254) 968-9300
owsley@tarleton.edu
www.tarleton.edu/animalsciences

Professors

  • Lambert, Barry Dr.
  • Owsley, Frank Dr.
  • Rosiere, Randall Dr.
  • Snyder, David Dr.

Associate professor

  • Waddell, Jolena Dr.

Assistant professors

  • Guay, Kimberly Dr.
  • Jones, Trinette Dr.
  • Kinman, Lea Dr.
  • Roper, David Dr.
  • Sawyer, Jason Dr.
  • Zisk, John Dr.

Instructor

  • Cockrell, Michelle Ms.
  • Doty, Bob Mr.
  • Eakin, Mark Mr.
  • Jared, Jackson Mr.
  • Price, Shelby Ms.
  • Walton, Roberta Ms.