Animal Science and Wildlife Management

The Department of Animal Science and Wildlife Management offers A Bachelor of Science in Animal Science with four different Concentrations: Science Concentration (traditional Animal Science), Production Concentration, Animal Industries Concentration, and Pre-Veterinary Medicine Concentration.  In addition, the department also offers a Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Management and Bachelor of Applied Science in Veterinary Technology. The particular emphasis within each option provides appropriate training according to the career interests of individual students. All students complete similar general education requirements, required by State and University regulations.

Historically, Tarleton has been known for its practical, hands-on approach to agricultural instruction. To allow for as much student exposure to real-life experiences as possible in an academic program, farm and ranch operations involving almost 2,000 acres of land and eight major teaching centers are utilized as agricultural laboratories. In addition to the animal facilities, several classrooms, indoor laboratories, two indoor-teaching pavilions, and an indoor equine arena are utilized in providing students with valuable “how-to-do” experiences.

  1. Bachelor of Science in Animal Science

    a.  Science Concentration
    This degree program provides a strong foundation in the scientific aspects (the "whys" and "hows") of animal production, nutrition, reproduction, anatomy, and physiology.  Supporting course work in chemistry, biology, and math provides students with background necessary to an understanding of the complex physiological and biological phenomena that explains why and how animals function and perform.

    b.  Production Concentration
    This degree program stresses the practice "how-to" aspects of commercial livestock production with somewhat less emphasis on the "whys" and "hows" of animal physiology and biochemistry.  Animal Production is especially designed for students who expect and desire a career in the commercial production, marketing an/or promotion phases of a livestock industry.

    c.  Animal Industries Concentration
    The Animal Industries degree program offers students the combination of a strong foundation in animal science courses and basic business courses needed by graduates entering commercial and business enterprises related to animal agriculture.

    d.  Pre-Veterinary Medicine Concentration
    Students desiring to pursue a veterinary medicine career can complete, at Tarleton, all necessary prerequisites for application to the professional Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program at Texas A&M University and other professional veterinary medicine schools.  Acceptance into the DVM program is quite competitive, and pre-vet students are encouraged to work closely with their academic advisor in planning their individual programs of study.  The completed pre-vet curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science.
     
  2. Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Management
    The objective of the wildlife management degree is to prepare students to work in the expanding field of wildlife management.  The curriculum has the proper content of wildlife management, range management, and biology to allow the student to become a certified wildlife biologist through The Wildlife Society.
     
  3. Bachelor of Applied Science in Veterinary Technology
    The Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) in Veterinary Technology provides a strong foundation of knowledge and training in animal health and business management for persons interested in advancing their careers as a clinical technologist with an advanced degree. It also provides a logical path for persons holding an associate's degree as a veterinary technician to explore and make available other career opportunities. Only students holding an Associate of Applied Science in Veterinary Technology are eligible to pursue this program.  Students completing the BAS program will be eligible to pursue their Master's degree or continue their lifelong learning through specialized certifications at Tarleton State University.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Animal Science

Required Courses
Communications
COMS 102Public Speaking 23
ENGL 111Introduction to College Composition3
ENGL 112College Composition and Research3
Lab Sciences
BIOL 120General Biology 34
or BIOL 121 General Biology
CHEM 103Fundamentals of Chemistry 44
or CHEM 105 College Chemistry I
ARTS3
Humanities (ENG2XX, PHIL 201) 53
HIST 201United States History through 18773
HIST 202United States History Since Reconstruction3
A EC 105Introduction to Agricultural Economics 63
or ECO 201 Principles of Economics: Macro
POLS 201American National Government3
POLS 202Texas Government3
MATH (107 or higher) 73
ANSC 100Transitioning to University Studies in Animal Sciences 81
ANIMAL SCIENCE CORE
ANSC 107General Animal Science3
Lower Level ANSC/ DS/WLDM/ENTO electives6
ANSC 309Feeds and Feeding 94
or ANSC 406 Animal Nutrition
PSSC 309Introduction to Genetics4
or BIOL 303 Genetics
ANSC 405Anatomy and Physiology of Farm Animals3
ANSC 308Physiology of Reproduction4
ANSC 321Meat Science 104
Animal Prod (ANSC 310, 313, 403, 410, 430, DS 302, WLDM 426 or ANSC 426) 116
Writing Intensive (ANSC 400, ENGL 309, AS&D 302, GB 312) 126
ANSC 485Seminar1
ANSC 486Animal Science Problems1-4
All Animal Science majors must complete the General Education requirements, the Animal Science core and one of the four concentrations below to complete their degree program.
Total Hours84-87
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Science Concentration
These courses are in addition to general education requirements and Animal Science core
Requires both BIOL 120 & 1214
CHEM 108College Chemistry II 134
CHEM 201Organic Chemistry I4
BIOL 307Microbiology4
Advanced BIOL or CHEM 4
MATH 120, 131, or 3503
ANSC 319Animal Breeding3
Advanced electives 1410
Total Hours36
Production Concentration
Students take these courses in addition to general education requirements and Animal Science core
Lower level ANSC elective 153
AGRN 105Fundamentals of Crop Prod3
ANSC 319Animal Breeding3
RNRM/WLDM 221Wildlife Conservation and Management3
or RNRM 301 Principles of Range Management
ANSC 484Internship3,6
Advanced business elective3
Advanced electives14-17
Total Hours32-38
Animal Industries Concentration
Students take these courses in addition to general education requirements and Animal Science core
Lower level ANSC electives 153
ECO 202Principles of Economics: Micro3
ACC 203Intro to Fin Accounting3
ACC 204Intro to Mgr Accounting3
or AGSD 211 Applied Analysis
A EC 230Agricultural Credit 163
A EC 312Production Economics 163
A EC 314Agri Mktg System 163
A EC 317Agricultural Statistics 163
ANSC 484Internship3,6
Advanced electives10
Total Hours37-40
Pre-veterinary Medicine Concentration
Students take these courses in addition to general education requirements and Animal Science core
BIOL 120General Biology 34
or BIOL 121 General Biology
In addition to the general eduction requirements and Animal Science core
BIOL 307Microbiology4
BIOL 474Biochemistry I3
or CHEM 474 Biochemistry I
BIOL 475Biochemistry II3
or CHEM 475 Biochemistry II
CHEM 108College Chemistry II4
CHEM 201Organic Chemistry I4
CHEM 202Organic Chemistry II4
PHYS 104General Physics I4
PHYS 105General Physics II4
MATH 109Plane Trigonometry 173
or MATH 118 Precalculus
MATH 120Calculus I 174
or MATH 350 Principles of Bio-Statistics
Total Hours41
1

 The Animal Science curriculum requires 8 SCH in lab sciences.

2

 Pre-vet can take COMS 102 or 202;  Science, Production, and Business concentrations should take 202.

3

 Pre-vet and Science Concentration must take both BIOL 120 and 121.

4

All ANSC concentrations should take 105;  Pre-vet and Science Concentration must take 105.

5

 Pre-vet must take ENG 2XX.

6

Pre-vet and science concentration should take A EC 105; Business concentration should take ECO 201.

7

 Pre-vet should take MATH 109 or 118 if qualified.

8

 Pre-vet concentration may also take DGS 101 instead.

9

 Pre-vet concentration and  Production concentration must take 309

10

 Pre-vet concentration may also take BIO 306 instead.

11

 Pre-vet and business concentration only needs 3 hours, production and business concentration is excluded to only ANSC courses.

12

 Pre-vet and science concentrations must take ANSC 400 and ENGL 309.

13

Requires CHEM 105.

14

 Three hours from 3XX or 4XX AGRN, R&RM, A EC, AS&D, ENTO or BIOL.

15

 In addition to the ANSC core.

16

Or equivalent.

17

 Students must take Math 109 or 118 to take physics, students should take one of these for Freshman math if qualified, if so, then total math credit in the pre-vet concentration would be 4 credit hours.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Wildlife Management

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
PSSC 301Soils4
ANSC 107General Animal Science3
ANSC 309Feeds and Feeding4
or ANSC 406 Animal Nutrition
BIOL 120 [shared] General Biology 2
BIOL 121General Biology4
BIOL 315Plant Taxonomy4
Select two of the following:7-8
Genetics
Introduction to Genetics
Introduction to Genetics
Ecology
Range Ecology
CHEM 105College Chemistry I 24
CHEM 108College Chemistry II4
ENGL 309Technical Writing & Document Design-WI3
ENTO 201General Entomology3
or ENTO 301 Veterinary Entomology
MATH 300Principles of Statistics3
or MATH 350 Principles of Bio-Statistics
Select one of the following:4
Introduction to Wildlife Management
The Animal Science Industry
WLDM 101Introduction to Wildlife Management1
WLDM 221Wildlife Conservation and Management3
or RNRM 221 Wildlife Conservation and Management
Select one of the following:3-4
GIS for Natural Resource Managers
Beef Cattle Production
Sheep and Goat Production
Organic Chemistry I
WLDM 310Wildlife Management Techniques3
or RNRM 310 Wldlfe Mgmt Tech
WLDM 385Fish and Wildlife Laws and Administration3
WLDM 485Seminar1
WLDM 484Internship3
or WLDM 440 Wildlife Field Studies
Total Hours106-108
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Certified Wildlife Biologist Emphasis
BIOL 430Ornithology4
or BIOL 451 Mammalogy
WLDM 201Avian Science3
or WLDM 426 Big Game Ecology and Management
WLDM 375Conservation of Natural Resources3
WLDM 401Population Dynamics3
or MATH 109 Plane Trigonometry
From ANSC, BIOL, RNRM, or WLDM
Select one of the following:3
Rangeland and Forest Plants
Principles of Range Management
Range Plants
Plant Physiology
Total Hours16
Wildlife Production Emphasis
ANSC 201Avian Science3
or WLDM 201 Avian Science
ANSC 426Big Game Ecology and Management3
or WLDM 426 Big Game Ecology and Management
ANSC 308Physiology of Reproduction4
ANSC 319Animal Breeding3
RNRM 300Rangeland and Forest Plants3
or RNRM 302 Range Plants
RNRM 301Principles of Range Management3
Total Hours19
1

Please see Academic Information section.

2

Course may be counted toward general education requirement.

Minor in Wildlife Management

Required Courses
BIOL 315Plant Taxonomy4
BIOL 401Ecology4
or RNRM 315 Range Ecology
WLDM 221Wildlife Conservation and Management3
WLDM 310Wildlife Management Techniques3
Select one of the following:4-5
WLDM Electives
Ornithology
Mammalogy
Ichthyology
Total Hours18-19

The Bachelor of Applied Science Degree in Veterinary Technology

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
Associate's Degree in Veterinary Technology43
VETE 312Strengths Based Leadership 1
VETE 402Advanced Veterinary Terminology3
VETE 405Pharmacology & Pharmacy3
VETE 409Veterinary Research & Writing3
VETE 411Safety & Regulatory Compliance3
VETE 413Animal Welfare3
VETE 495Capstone3
VETE 498Veterinary Technology Special Problems 1
Total Hours105
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Companion Animal
VETE 421Companion Animal Care3
VETE 423Companion Animal Nutrition3
VETE 425Anesthesiology & Surgical Nursing3
VETE 461Emergency & Critical Care (elective)2
VETE 462Dental Procedures & Techniques (elective)2
VETE 463Shelter Animal Medicine (elective)2
Total Hours15
Equine
VETE 431Equine Care & Health Management3
VETE 433Equine Nutrition3
VETE 435Equine Anesthesiology & Surgical Nursing3
VETE 471Equine Lameness & Treatment Modalities (elective)2
VETE 472Equine Pain Management, Current Trends (elective)2
VETE 473Emergency & Critical Care of Horses (elective)2
Total Hours15
Veterinary Business Management
VETE 441Veterinary Business & Financial Management3
VETE 442Human Resource and Client Management in Veterinary Facilities3
VETE 444Marketing & Strategic Thinking3
VETE 481Veterinary Management Law (elective)2
VETE 482Practice Organization and Technology (elective)2
VETE 312Strengths Based Leadership (elective)2
Total Hours15
1

Please see Academic Information section

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program

Suggestions for Application for Admission to College of Veterinary Medicine Texas A&M University1
A. Typical Curriculum
ANSC 101Animal Science Industry1
or AGRI 100
ENTO 301Veterinary Entomology3
BIOL 120General Biology4
BIOL 121General Biology Anim Emphasis4
BIOL 307Microbiology4
BIOL 474Biochemistry I3
BIOL 475Biochemistry II3
CHEM 105College Chemistry I4
CHEM 108College Chemistry II4
CHEM 201Organic Chemistry I4
CHEM 202Organic Chemistry II4
ENGL 111 [WI] Intro to College Composition3
ENGL 112 [WI] College Comp and Research3
ENGL 220Introduction to Literature3
ENGL 309 [WI] Tech Writing & Document Design3
MATH 107College Algebra3
MATH 109Plane Trigonometry3
MATH 120Calculus I4
or MATH 350 Principles of Bio-Statistics
HIST 201U.S. History through 18773
HIST 202US History Since Reconstruct3
Select one of the following:4
PSSC 309Introduction to Genetics4
Intro to Genetics
Heredity
ANSC 107General Animal Science3
ANSC 309Feeds and Feeding4
ANSC 406Animal Nutrition3
PHYS 104General Physics I4
PHYS 105General Physics II4
POLS 201Amer Natl Govt3
POLS 202Texas Government3
Total Hours98

1

Requirements subject to change pending decisions of TAMU College of Veterinary Medicine.  If a fourth year of study leading to a baccalaureate degree is pursued prior to entry into veterinary college, additional Tarleton general education requirements must be completed.


B. Accelerated Curriculum1
ANSC 101Animal Science Industry1
or AGRI 100
Select one of the following:4
PSSC 309Introduction to Genetics4
Intro to Genetics
Heredity
ANSC 107General Animal Science3
ANSC 309Feeds and Feeding4
or ANSC 406 Animal Nutrition
BIOL 120General Biology4
BIOL 121General Biology Anim Emphasis4
BIOL 307Microbiology4
BIOL 474Biochemistry I3
or CHEM 474 Biochemistry I
BIOL 475Biochemistry II3
or CHEM 475 Biochemistry II
CHEM 105College Chemistry I4
CHEM 108College Chemistry II4
CHEM 201Organic Chemistry I4
CHEM 202Organic Chemistry II4
ENGL 111 [WI] Intro to College Composition3
ENGL 112 [WI] College Comp and Research3
ENGL 220Introduction to Literature3
MATH 107College Algebra3
MATH 107College Algebra3
MATH 120Calculus I4
or MATH 350 Principles of Bio-Statistics
ENGL 309 [WI] Tech Writing & Document Design3
PHYS 104General Physics I4
PHYS 105General Physics II4
Total Hours80

1

 Recommended for gifted students with exceptionally strong high school background.  Meets minimum recommendations for application to the professional veterinary medical program.  All courses can also be applied towards a BS degree in Animal Science or other chosen related field; however, additional lower-level courses are required to meet Tarleton and/or State of Texas baccalaureate requirements.

A program in Pre-Veterinary Medicine is also offered through the Department of Biological Sciences. Although the Pre-Veterinary programs offered through the Departments of Animal Sciences and Biological Sciences each meet all the requirements for admission to the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, a student is typically best suited for one program or the other. It is important that a student discuss with an advisor which program is best suited to his or her interests, skills, and goals.

For additional detailed information on application and other requirements, refer to the current issue of "Applicant Information," available from:

College of Veterinary Medicine
Texas A&M University
College Station, TX 77843-4461
phone (800) 874-9591

Animal Science Courses

ANSC 101. Animal Science Industry. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of the Animal Science industry, its challenges and recent trends as they affect entering students and their career plans and preparations.

ANSC 107. General Animal Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). (TCCN = AGRI 1319)

The scientific study of animal agriculture involving beef cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and horses. Subjects covered will include management practices involving reproduction, nutrition, health, handling, genetic selection, and shelter. Marketing strategies and procedures. CREDIT FOR ANSC 107 & VETE 107 WILL NOT BE AWARDED. Lab fee $13.

ANSC 109. Intro to Horse Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to some of the fundamental aspects of horse production, including the scope and status of the equine industry. Functional anatomy and dental hygiene of the horse are treated in detail, and the disciplines of nutrition and reproduction are introduced. Prerequisite: ANSC 107 or approval of department head.

ANSC 120. Rodeo Production and Skills. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of rodeo activities including organization, promotion, and management of rodeos. Skill development in all standard events will be emphasized with special attention to student needs. Lab fee $10.

ANSC 150. Rodeo Techniques. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Skill development in all standard events will be emphasized, with special attention to student needs. Students must be members of the Tarleton varsity rodeo team. Credits may substitute for required P ED only and may be repeated. Prerequisite: approval of rodeo coach.

ANSC 201. Avian Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to the study of birds, their structure, physiology, reproduction, ecology and behavior. Relates gamebird production and biology to basic ornithological principles. Laboratory covers production of gamebirds from conception and incubation to marketing and sales. Gamebirds studied are various quail, pheasant, partridge, and wild turkey species. Credit for both WLDM 201 and ANSC 201 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: Sophomore classification or approval of the department head.

ANSC 202. Dairying. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of the diary industry, dairy breeds, standards for selection and culling, herd replacements, feeding, management, and health maintenance. The food value, composition and quality, utilization, and processing of market milk and dairy products will be discussed. Credit for both D S 202 and ANSC 202 will not be awarded.

ANSC 203. Basic Horsemanship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Instruction and practice of basic horsemanship skills. Focus will be on the proper use of feet, seat, hands and legs to provide the horse with the correct stimulus to perform basic maneuvers. Criteria from the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association Instructor Certification Exam will be presented. Prerequisite: ANSC 109. Lab fee $5.

ANSC 207. Market Animal Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). (TCCN = AGRI 1325)

Phenotypic evaluation of market animals including cattle, swine, and sheep. Emphasis on selection of market animals designated for slaughter. Evaluation of the economically important carcass characteristics for each species will be studied. Prerequisite: ANSC 107. Lab fee $12.

ANSC 210. Intro to Veterinary Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to veterinary science including structure and function of major body systems, nutrition, diseases, and surgical principles. Both farm animals and companion animals will be discussed. Prerequisite: ANSC 107.

ANSC 213. Horse Psy and Training. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles of breaking and training young horses, training techniques, basic anatomy, recognition of unsoundness and defects, and corrective techniques. Prerequisites: ANSC 109 and 200. Lab fee $4.

ANSC 215. Principles of Farrier Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles of horseshoeing. Trimming and horseshoeing techniques; recognition and correction of lameness and conformation defects. Anatomy and physiology of locomotion. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Additional fee may be charged for supplies and materials. Student must furnish basic tools.

ANSC 225. Equine Behavior Modification. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Application of the principles of equine psychology to train young horses. Students will be assigned a two- or three-year-old horse to train in the fundamental maneuvers of equitation. Students will prepare these horses to be marketed in an annual horse sale. The fundamentals of sale management will also be covered. Prerequisite: ANSC 213.

ANSC 305. Equine Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Comparative evaluation of horses for show and competition. Conformation analysis, judging, basic exercise physiology, conditioning, and sales preparation will be presented.

ANSC 307. Livestock and Meat Evaluation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Comparative evaluation of breeding and market animals with emphasis on live animal selection, official carcass grading, carcass contest, wholesale cut selection and pricing, and performance testing. Oral reasons and written justifications on placing classes will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ANSC 207 or approval of department head and instructor. Lab fee $13.

ANSC 308. Physiology of Reproduction. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Breeding efficiency of cattle, sheep, swine, and horses. Study includes the anatomy and physiology of the male and female reproductive tracts, hormones directly controlling reproduction, estrus and estrous cycles, ovulation, mating, gestation, pregnancy tests, parturition, sperm physiology, semen evaluation, collection and storage of semen, and the primary causes of sterility in males and females. CREDIT FOR BOTH ANSC 308 & VETE 308 WILL NOT BE AWARDED. Prerequisites: ANSC 107 and junior classification. Lab fee $15.

ANSC 309. Feeds and Feeding. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Study of principal feeds and feed-stuffs from a practical point of view. Feeding standards and calculation of rations for maintenance, growth, fattening, and for milk, wool, and egg production. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Lab fee $10.

ANSC 310. Prin Equine Repro. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Application of fundamental concepts and principles of equine genetics, breeding and reproduction. Prerequisites: ANSC 200, 308 and either 213 or permission of instructor based on documentation of prior experience with stallions. Lab fee $15.

ANSC 313. Sheep and Goat Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Practical applications of breeding, feeding, management, disease and parasite control with regard to range and farm conditions; fitting and showing. Wool and mohair production; grading; sorting; and marketing. Prerequisite: ANSC 107. Lab fee $10.

ANSC 315. Animal Diseases and Parasites. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Diseases of farm animals, both infectious and non-infectious, parasites, parasitic diseases. Disease and parasite prevention through sanitation, treatment of animal diseases. CREDIT FOR ANSC 315 & VETE 315 WILL NOT BE AWARDED. Prerequisite: Junior classification or approval of Department head. Lab fee $2.

ANSC 319. Animal Breeding. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Specialized study of the application of genetic principles to livestock breeding. Improvement of the economic traits of farm animals by utilizing the principles of heritability and selection. Breeding and selection systems in cattle, swine, sheep, and horse production. Prerequisite: AGRN 309 or equivalent.

ANSC 321. Meat Science. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Study of the science and physical processes involved in converting selected farm animals into marketable products. Particular attention will be given to the anatomy and nomenclature of meats, sanitation practices, and evaluation. Various techniques used by commercial establishments will be accentuated in the study of meat processing. Prerequisites: ANSC 107 and junior classification, or approval of department head.

ANSC 324. Horse Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Includes health of stallion, mare, and foal. Nutrition and selection of optimum feeding programs. Prerequisites: ANSC 200 and 309. Lab fee $2.

ANSC 325. Equine Exercise Phys & Cond. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Studies of the influence of training and conditioning on muscle physiology, cardiovascular physiology, the biomechanics of locomotion, and energy utilization. This course is designed for students primarily interested in training and recreational riding. Students will receive training and experience in evaluating and monitoring the levels of conditioning in horses. Fundamental rehabilitation and treatment of sports injuries will be included. Prerequisites: ANSC 213, 321, 324, or approval of department head.

ANSC 330. Basic Equine Assisted Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Study and application of the methods of using the horse in a therapy program. Guidelines from the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association. Students will gain practical experience in the development and conduct of an equine-assisted therapy program. Prerequisite: approval of department head.

ANSC 331. Adv Equine Assisted Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Advanced studies in the use of the horse in a therapeutic riding program. Students will gain the hands-on experience and the information about riding, instruction and safety necessary to become a Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor with the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association. Prerequisites: ANSC 109, 330, and approval of the instructor.

ANSC 399. Coop Education. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to integrate academic study with work experience that is germane to their major or minor. Enrollment requires a two-semester minimum commitment that may be accomplished by 1) alternating semesters of full-time study with semesters of curriculum-related employment, or 2) enrolling in courses at least half-time (6 semester hours) and working part-time in parallel positions of curriculum-related employment. The department Cooperative Education advisor will supervise the student's experience and assign the final grade based on the student's final report which is required to complete the course. Students may participate in the Cooperative Education program for an unlimited number of semesters but a maximum of 6 hours credit may be counted toward a degree. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 semester hours which includes 12 hours in the major or minor discipline in which the Cooperative Education course is desired, minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the appropriate major or minor field, and department head approval. Field experience fee $50.

ANSC 400. Resrch and Writing in ANSC. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Detailed discussions and literature review of current knowledge in areas such as reproductive and alimentary physiology, nutrition, parasitology, pharmacology, and genetics. Topics will include experimental design and statistical evaluation of agricultural research. Students will prepare various types of writings based on scientific literature. CREDIT FOR ANSC 400 & VETE 400 WILL NOT BE AWARDED. Prerequisite: senior classification in agriculture.

ANSC 403. Beef Cattle Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Beef cattle industry, principles involved in breeding, feeding, management, disease and parasite control, and marketing analysis of ranch and feed lot systems. Prerequisite: ANSC 309 or 406. Lab fee $9.

ANSC 405. Anat & Physiology of Farm Anim. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to comparative anatomy and physiology of farm animals. The roles of the various systems of the animal body will be studied with practical applications made to animal production. Prerequisite: ANSC 107 or equivalent and junior classification.

ANSC 406. Animal Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The animal body, its composition and food, some physiochemical bases of life processes; digestion, composition, metabolism, and functions of feeds and nutrients; vitamins, inorganic elements, and metabolism; growth, reproduction, lactation. CREDIT FOR ANSC 406 & VETE 406 WILL NOT BE AWARDED. Prerequisites: ANSC 107 and senior classification or approval of instructor.

ANSC 408. Envir Phys Farm Animals. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Studies of farm animals and interactions with their physical environment. Detailed attention is given to the effects of changes and extremes in natural and artificial animal environments, including temperatures, shelter, altitude, humidity, crowding, and other stress factors associated with modern livestock production and handling practices. Prerequisites: ANSC 405 and senior classification or approval of department head.

ANSC 410. Swine Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Applications of breeding, feeding, housing, sanitation, and disease control. Analysis of herd records. Prerequisite: ANSC 309 or 406. Lab fee $8.

ANSC 412. Meat Process & Merchandising. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The chemical and physical characteristics of meats and their relations to the processing and manufacturing of meat food items. Carcass value as influenced by merchandising techniques and practices. Sanitation control and commercial and retail operations will be stressed. Laboratory work will include meat processing and the development of competencies in processing all classes of livestock. Prerequisite: ANSC 321 or approval of department head. Lab fee $10.

ANSC 426. Big Game Eco and Mgmt. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Survey of distributions and life histories of North American big game species. Productivity, food habits, economic significance and management will be examined. Will include a study of current management strategies employed on deer farms in North America with a focus on the Texas deer industry and impacts on traditional wildlife management. Credit for both ANSC 426 and WLDM 426 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: WLDM 221 and 8 hours of advanced ANSC/WLDM or approval of the department head. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student.

ANSC 430. Horse Enterprise Mgmt. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Individualized instruction in management techniques for horse enterprises. Record systems, marketing, and business operation procedures. Prerequisites: Senior classification in ANSC and approval of instructor.

ANSC 450. Feed Analysis. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Analytical techniques for determining the nutrient content of animal feeds. Students will learn to measure moisture, protein, fiber, carbohydrates, fats, and minerals. Different methods for estimating the useable energy content of feeds will be presented. Prerequisite: CHEM 108 or approval of department head.

ANSC 458. Lab Topics in Animal Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Individualized instruction in laboratory analytical procedures, techniques, and instrumentation commonly used in animal and food sciences. Topics involve various aspects of analysis techniques associated with nutrition, reproduction, breeding, physiology, and meats and dairy-products processing. May be repeated once when topics vary. Lab fee $20. Students may also need to purchase appropriate personal articles such as protective apparel.

ANSC 484. Internship. 3,6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Formally arranged and approved on-the-job training with cooperating sponsor in a commercial or private sector of the livestock or meats industries. A minimum of 40 hours of training is required for each hour of academic credit. A maximum of six hours credit may be earned by internship completion. Oral and written reports of internship experience required. Prerequisite: Advanced standing and approval of department head. Field experience fee $50.

ANSC 485. Seminar. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A review of current problems and developments in agriculture; professional opportunities and responsibilities; individual investigations and reports. CREDIT FOR ANSC 485 & VETE 485 WILL NOT BE AWARDED. Prerequisite: Senior classification.

ANSC 486. Animal Science Problems. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Individualized study of current topics in student's major concentration of study or supporting discipline. Specific content and credit dependent upon student's interest, needs, and depth of study. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours credit. Prerequisite: Senior classification and advance approval by academic advisor.

ANSC 490. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Selected topics in the animal sciences. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, with a maximum of six hours. Prerequisite: approval of department head.

Wildlife Management Courses

WLDM 101. Intro to Wildlife Mgmt. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

(TCCNS = AGRI 1131) A seminar course for Wildlife Management majors that introduces students to the field of Wildlife Management; acquaints students with academic facilities, programs, and requirements; and teaches study skills for successful college and lifetime learning.

WLDM 201. Avian Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). (TCCN = AGRI 1327)

An introduction to the study of birds, their structure, physiology, reproduction, ecology and behavior. Relates gamebird production and biology to basic ornithological principles. Laboratory covers production of game birds from conception and incubation to marketing and sales. Gamebirds studied are various quail, pheasant, partridge, and wild turkey species. Credit for both WLDM 201 and ANSC 201 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: Sophomore classification or approval of the department head.

WLDM 221. Wildlife Conservation and Mgmt. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). (TCCN = AGRI 2330)

An introduction to the principles and practices of managing wildlife and habitat; factors regulating wildlife populations including behavior, disease, predation, and harvest; and public policy related to wildlife conservation. Credit for both R&RM.

WLDM 305. GIS for Natural Resource Mgrs. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introductory course on use of geographic information systems (GIS) in natural resource management. Laboratory exercises will apply knowledge learned in lectures to solve real world problems in natural resource management using GIS software. Crosslisted with AGRN 305 and RNRM 305: credit will not be given for multiple enrollments in these crosslisted courses. Prerequisites: WLDM 221 or RNRM 221 or junior classification. Lab fee $15.

WLDM 310. Wildlife Management Techiques. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Field and laboratory techniques used in wildlife management and research. Determining age and food habits, population analysis, habitat analysis, and introduction to research.Credit for both R&RM 310 and WLDM 310 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: WLDM 221 and one semester statistics. Modest costs of field trips will be borne by the student.

WLDM 311. Wildlife Diseases. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Basic mechanisms of diseases as they occur in wildlife populations; interplay of habitat requirements, individual physiological requirements and disease producing mechanisms of varied wildlife species. Control/Prevention of infectious, non-infectious, parasitic diseases and parasites. Prerequisite: WLDM 221 and sophomore classification or approval of department head.

WLDM 375. Conservation Natural Resources. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles and philosophies associated with the development, management, and use of natural resources are studied in the relationship to the ecological and social implications inherent in management alternatives involving the natural environment and use of renewable natural resources. Prerequisite: Junior classification.

WLDM 385. Fish & Wildlife Laws and Admin. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A review and analysis of state and federal laws and international treaties and conventions affecting fish and wildlife; their application and administration. The organizational structure of state, federal and international agencies; their objectives, policies and practices. Prerequisite: WLDM 221 and junior classification.

WLDM 399. Cooperative Education. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to integrate academic study with work experience that is germane to their major or minor. Enrollment requires a two-semester minimum commitment that may be accomplished by 1) alternating semesters of full-time study with semester of curriculum-related employment, or 2) enrolling in courses at least half-time (6 semester hours) and working part-time in parallel position of curriculum-related employment. The department Cooperative Education advisor will supervise the student's experience and assign the final grade based on the student's final report, which is required to complete the course. Students may participate in the Cooperative Education program for an unlimited number of semesters but a maximum of 6 hours credit may be counted toward a degree. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 semester hours which includes 12 hours in the major or minor discipline in which the Cooperative Education course is desired, minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the appropriate major or minor field, and department head approval. Field experience fee $50.

WLDM 401. Population Dynamics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to population biology, including models of simple population growth, competition, and predator-prey interactions; demographic rates and life tables; and techniques for estimating demographic parameters.

WLDM 405. Urban Wildlife and Fisheries. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Urban wildlife and fisheries trains students to establish and maintain diverse, self-sustaining urban wildlife and fish populations at levels in harmony with ecological, social, and economic values of the human community and to develop optimal levels of public appreciation and use of urban wildlife and fish resources and associated habitats. Includes discussions on conservation education as a tool for furthering urban wildlife and fisheries appreciation. Prerequisites: WLDM 221, 310, 375 or approval of department head.

WLDM 426. Big Game Eco and Mgmt. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Survey of distributions and life histories of North American big game species. Productivity, food habits, economic significance and management will be examined. Will include a study of current management strategies employed on deer farms in North America with a focus on the Texas deer industry and impacts on traditional wildlife management. Credit for both ANSC 426 and WLDM 426 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: WLDM 221 and 8 hours of advanced ANSC/WLDM or approval of the department head. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student.

WLDM 440. Wildlife Field Studies. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A field course in which students capture, measure, and mark animals; collect descriptive measures of vegetation that characterize wildlife habitat; and record field observations using a journal. This course requires a one-week field trip at student's expense (in addition to field experience fee). Prerequisites: WLDM 221,310. Field experience fee $50.

WLDM 484. Internship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Formally arranged and approved on-the-job training with a cooperating sponsor in government or private sector of the wildlife management or natural resources field. A minimum of 40 hours of training is required for each hour of academic credit. A maximum of six hours may be earned by internship completion. Oral and written reports of internship experience required. Prerequisite: Advanced standing and approval of department head. Field experience fee $50.

WLDM 485. Seminar. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A review of current issues and developments in wildlife management and natural resources; professional opportunities and responsibilities; individual investigations and reports using scientific and popular literature. Prerequisites: WLDM 221, 310, 375 and senior classification in WLDM.

WLDM 486. Problems. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Individualized study of current topics in wildlife management, natural resource management or a supporting discipline. Specific content and credit depend upon student's interests, needs, and depth of study. Maximum undergraduate credit, six semester hours. Prerequisite: Senior classification and advance approval by academic advisor.

WLDM 490. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Selected topics in wildlife and natural resource management. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, with a maximum of six hours. Prerequisite: WLDM 221, 310, advanced classification and approval of department head.

Dr. Ben Bruce, Department Head
Department of Animal Science and Wildlife Management
Joe W. Autry Agriculture Building, Room 116
Box T-0070
Stephenville, Texas 76402
(254) 968-9222
bruce@tarleton.edu
www.tarleton.edu/animalsciences

Professors

  • Cadle
  • Harp
  • Snyder

Associate professors

  • Breeden
  • Bruce
  • Lambert

Assistant professors

  • Sawyer
  • Schewertner
  • Zisk

Instructors

  • Doty
  • Eakin
  • Jackson