Wildlife, Sustainability and Ecosystem Sciences

The Department of Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences is dedicated to understanding and managing the earth's ecosystems upon which human society depends.  Our mission is to prepare students to confront the environmental challenges of present and future generations by sustainably managing the Earth’s natural resources and reducing the impact of human society on the natural environment, through multidisciplinary undergraduate and graduate teaching, experiential learning, and research.

The Department of Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences offers two Bachelor of Science degrees -- the BS in Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences and the BS in Environmental Sciences.  Within each degree, students may choose from several degree tracks to fit their unique interests and career goals.  Through the faculty-student advisement process, a course of study is developed to allow the student to pursue his/her interest and potential while preparing for a long-term, productive career in the natural resource and environmental sciences.  All degree programs stress hands-on interactions in the classroom, as well as through required internships other applied learning experiences.  All of the career tracks within the Department are strongly science/discipline-based with the goal of providing the graduate with the academic background necessary to compete in the current employment market and to be a life-long contributor to the profession.

Professional certifications -- A number of our programs fulfill the educational requirements for various certified professionals.  While the certification is not conferred upon graduation, graduates can apply to the relevant professional society for certification.  One or more of the degree tracks listed below fulfill the educational requirements for the following professional certifications:

  • Certified Wildlife Biologist -- The Wildlife Society
  • Certified Fisheries Professional --The American Fisheries Society
  • Certified Ecologist --The Ecological Society of America
  • Certified Rangeland Professional --The Society for Range Management
  • Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner --Society for Ecological Restoration
  • Certified Professional Soil Scientist -- Soil Science Society of America
  • Certified Crop Advisor --The American Society of Agronomy

Students pursuing a Bachelor Science in Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences may select from the following degree tracks:

  1. Wildlife Science
    Wildlife biologists play a critical role in conserving the wildlife that is so valuable to society.  The Wildlife Science option has foundation courses in biology, ecology, and wildlife science, and provides opportunities for students to gain field experience through internships and other applied learning experiences.  This program is designed to prepare graduates for a career in wildlife conservation and management, and will all the educational requirements to become a Certified Wildlife Biologist through The Wildlife Society.  Graduates in this field frequently find careers with state and federal wildlife agencies, non-governmental organizations, environmental consulting firms, and private ranches.
  1. Fisheries Science
    Fisheries biologist manage freshwater and marine fisheries to conserve and produce fish stocks for both recreational and commercial fishing.  The Fisheries Science option combines basic understanding of fish biology and aquatic sciences with a deep knowledge of applied ecology and fisheries management to provide the student with a well-rounded education necessary for a career in fisheries management, or pursuit of an advance degree in the field.  Students gain valuable hands-on experience, both in the learning laboratory as well as in the field.  The Fisheries Science curriculum meets the requirements set forth by the American Fisheries Society for certification as a Certified Fisheries Professional.  Graduates in this field find careers in government as well as the private sector.
  1. Pre-Veterinary Medicine
    The Pre-Veterinary Medicine option is designed to prepare students for admission to a college of veterinary medicine, and an eventual career as a veterinarian.  The course curriculum is based upon all the requirements set forth by the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine.  Additional courses prepare students for a career in wildlife science, or for a future specialization in wildlife or zoo medicine.  While graduates from the program can pursue any veterinary specialty (small-animal, livestock, or wildlife), the additional wildlife courses allow a student to simultaneously pursue their interests in wildlife.
  1. Natural Resource Ecology
    Natural systems support the many ecosystem services and natural benefits that are required by all life on Earth -- things like clean air, abundant water, wildlife habitat, and livestock grazing lands.  The Natural Resource Ecology option encompasses such disciplines as range science and restoration ecology.  This options provides the required coursework to become a Professional in Rangeland Management certified by the Society for Range Management, or a Certified Restoration Practitioner endorsed by the Society for Ecological Restoration.  It focuses on management of plant communities in range, forest, and other wildland systems.  Graduates in this field are qualified for careers on private ranches and farms, whether operating their own farm or ranch or as professional consultants.  They are also prepared for careers with such organizations as the Natural Resource Conservation Service, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, the US Forest Service, and The Nature Conservancy.
  2.  
  3. Soil Science
    Soil scientists are concerned with the one resource upon which our food production and wildlands alike depend -- the Earth's soils.  The Soil Science option focuses on the chemical, physical, and ecological properties of soils that make them vital to conservation of many natural resources.  Courses are available covering soil fertility, soil as a component of the environment, soil's role in land management, and soil genesis, morphology, and classification.  This option prepares the student for a lucrative career as a soil conservationist or soil scientist with such agencies as the Natural Resource Conservation Service, or the US Forest Service, US Bureau of Land Management, US Environmental Protection Agency, and other State and Federal agencies working in both wildland and agricultural systems.
  4.  
  5. Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture
    Recent years have seen astounding changes in agriculture.  The old ways of doing things simply no longer work in the modern era of rising demands for food, increased environmental degradation, and climate change.  Modern agriculture requires modern, progressive agriculturalists and scientists.  The Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture option brings tried and true methods of food production into modern times.  It combines advanced techniques such as aquaponics, permaculture, integrated pest management, urban and suburban farming, and small-scale farming to produce more, healthier food with less water, land, fertilizer, and pesticides, and a smaller carbon footprint.  Graduates with this degree are well prepared to entire the field of sustainable agriculture, whether on their own farm or ranch or as part of a larger enterprise.  Graduates may also contribute to society as consultants, educators, extension professionals, and urban agriculture specialists.
  6.  
  7. Food and Nutrition
    Perhaps humanity's most basic connection with the environment is through our food supply; thus, food and nutrition lie at the nexus of environmental sustainability, agricultural production, and human health.  The Food and Nutrition option focuses on the science-based aspects of human nutrition, food, and agriculture and the application of those principles related to food selection, preparation, and consumption in order  to achieve and maintain health and well-being across the life span.  Foundation courses in food and nutrition science, biology, and chemistry provide opportunities for students to gain field experiences through applied learning activities and internships.  This program is designed to prepare graduates to work in the field of nutrition and health promotion and will lay the groundwork for an advanced degree in nutrition or food science, or Chiropractic or Physician’s Assistant school.  Graduates from the program will be prepared for careers in nutrition and health education, health agencies, corporate wellness, Texas A&M Agri-Life Extension Service, WIC (Women, Infant, and Children’s government nutrition program), and various food companies.
  8.  
  9. Sustainable Food Systems
    The Sustainable Food Systems provides a fundamental understanding of food, nutrition and agriculture.  These fields also encompass some of the most critically important and hotly debated issues affecting modern society including world hunger, food safety, bioengineering, and globalization of food. This program is for students who want to explore the cultural, historical, and sociological and scientific aspects of food, nutrition, production and consumptionGraduates emerge from the program equipped for careers in both the public sector and private industry, ready to help consumers make better informed decisions about food, nutrition, and health, while preparing society to overcome environmental challenges.
  10.  

Students pursuing a Bachelor Science in Environmental Sciences may select from the following degree tracks:

  1. Science
    The Science option is designed for students interested in pursuing careers with environmental consulting companies or conducting environmental assessments of land or water resources.  Students will examine water resources, water quality protection, and environmental management practices.  This is an excellent program for students interested in pursuing a graduate degree in environmental science, hydrology, or environmental engineering.  This rigorous degree includes two semester each of biology and chemistry, as well as at least 20 hours of advanced environmental science courses.
  2.  
  3. Geospatial Information Science
    The Geospatial Information Science option is designed for students interested in land-use planning or in analyzing environmental interactions across the environment. It is also an excellent program for students interested in environmental education or work with environmental advocacy organizations. This rigorous degree program includes an option for a GIS certification while exploring ecological, social, and economic interactions across the landscape.
  4.  
  5. Environmental Policy
    The Environmental Policy option is designed for students interested in environmental law, investigating the impacts of government policies on environmental conditions, and assessing impacts of resource use and pollution on human communities. It is also an excellent program for business professionals involved in developing or implementing environmentally sound business practices. This rigorous degree program includes an in-depth exploration of environmental policies, environmental law, environmental sociology, and environmental economics. 

Minors -- The Department of Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences offers a number of options for minors.  Minors offer a way for students with secondary interests to complement their major, thus broadening their expertise and increasing their employability. 

Degree Requirements

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences

Field of Study Courses
ENGL 3309 [WI] Technical writing and Document Design3
Experiential Learning Requirement (choose one):1
Internship in the Natural Resource Sciences
Undergraduate Research in the Natural Resource Sciences
Natural Resource Field Studies
Study Abroad
WSES 4187Senior Capstone Seminar1
Other Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
ENGL 1301 [shared] [WI] Composition I
ENGL 1302 [shared] [WI] Composition II
GOVT 2305 [shared] Federal Government (Federal Constitution and Topics)
GOVT 2306 [shared] Texas Government (Texas Constitution and Topics)
Total Hours47
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Wildlife Science
BIOL 1406
BIOL 1407 [shared]
Biology for Science Majors
and Biology for Science Majors II
CHEM 1411College Chemistry I4
MATH 1342 [shared] Elementary Statistical Methods
MATH 2412Precalculus Math4
or MATH 1316 Plane Trigonometry
PHIL 2303 [shared] Introduction to Logic
Physical Science Elective (choose one):2
College Chemistry II
College Physics I
Physical Geology
Historical Geology
Introduction to Environmental Science
Natural Disasters
Soil Physical Properties
BIOL 3303Genetics3
or AGRI 3409 Genetics
SOIL 3301
SOIL 3101
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
4
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
WSES 2322Principles of Wildlife Conservation and Management3
WSES 2451Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
WSES 3305GIS for Natural Resource Scientists3
Choose one of the following:3
Analysis of Natural Resource Data
Vegetation Measurement, Inventory, and Monitoring
Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification
Choose two of the following (at least one must be BIOL 4430, BIOL 4440, or BIOL 4451):8
Natural History of the Vertebrates
Ethology
Ornithology
Herpetology
Mammalogy
Choose two of the following:8
Wildland Plant Identification and Ecology
Dendrology and Woody Plant Identification
Plant Taxonomy
WSES 3310Wildlife Management Techniques3
WSES 3303Veterinary Entomology3
or WSES 3311 Wildlife Diseases
Human Dimensions and Environmental Policy Requirement (choose two):6
Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources
Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion
Fish and Wildlife Laws and Administration
Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management
Soils, Land Use, and The Environment
WSES 4301Population Dynamics, Modeling, and Analysis3
WSES 4302 [WI] Habitat Management3
WSES 4327Avian Ecology and Management3
or WSES 4326 Big Game Ecology and Management
Electives:2
Choose at least two hours in WSES or SOIL 3XXX or 4XXX, or RNRM 3301
Total Hours73
Soil Science
AGRI 1307
AGRI 1107
Agronomy
and Agronomy Laboratory
4
BIOL 1406
BIOL 1407 [shared]
Biology for Science Majors
and Biology for Science Majors II
BIOL 3303Genetics3
or AGRI 3409 Genetics
BIOL 3407Microbiology4
Choose one of the following:3
Plant Pathology
Plant Physiology
Biochemistry I
CHEM 1411College Chemistry I4
CHEM 1412College Chemistry II4
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I4
MATH 1342 [shared] Elementary Statistical Methods
MATH 2412Precalculus Math4
or MATH 1316 Plane Trigonometry
SOIL 3301
SOIL 3101
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
4
SOIL 3302Soils, Land Use, and The Environment3
SOIL 3412Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification4
SOIL 4212Soil Ecology2
SOIL 4213Soil Physical Properties2
SOIL 4450Soil Nutrient Cycling4
Choose one of the following:4
Wildland Plant Identification and Ecology
Dendrology and Woody Plant Identification
Plant Taxonomy
PHIL 2303 [shared] Introduction to Logic
Environmental Policy Requirement (choose one):3
Sustainability
Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources
Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion
Water Resources Policy and Management
Environmental Politics
International Environmental Issues
Environmental Law
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
WSES 2451Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
WSES 3305GIS for Natural Resource Scientists3
WSES 4309 [WI] Plant-Animal Interactions3
Elective:3
Choose at least 3 hours from SOIL, WSES, CHEM, or BIOL 3XXX or 4XXX
Total Hours73
Natural Resource Ecology
AGRI 1307
AGRI 1107
Agronomy
and Agronomy Laboratory
4
BIOL 1406
BIOL 1407 [shared]
Biology for Science Majors
and Biology for Science Majors II
CHEM 1411College Chemistry I4
MATH 1342 [shared] Elementary Statistical Methods
MATH 2412Precalculus Math4
or MATH 1316 Plane Trigonometry
PHIL 2303 [shared] Introduction to Logic
ECON 2302Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON 3304Environmental Economics3
RNRM 3301Principles of Range Management3
RNRM 4301Perspectives and Practices in Grazing Management3
SOIL 3301
SOIL 3101
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
4
SOIL 3302Soils, Land Use, and The Environment3
WSES 2301General Entomology3-4
or BIOL 3436 Plant Physiology
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
WSES 2322Principles of Wildlife Conservation and Management3
WSES 2451Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
WSES 3313Plant Diversity and Conservation3
WSES 3320Watershed Management3
WSES 3406Wildland Plant Identification and Ecology4
WSES 3408Dendrology and Woody Plant Identification4
WSES 4303Ecological Restoration of Plant Communities3
WSES 4309 [WI] Plant-Animal Interactions3
WSES 4311Fire Ecology3
WSES 4313Vegetation Measurement, Inventory, and Monitoring3
or WSES 3305 GIS for Natural Resource Scientists
Elective:2
Choose at least 2 hours from WSES or SOIL 3XXX or 4XXX 3
Total Hours73
Sustainable Food Systems
BIOL 1406 [shared] Biology for Science Majors
BIOL 1407 [shared] Biology for Science Majors II
MATH 1314 [shared] College Algebra
ANSC 4300 [WI] Research and Writing in Animal Science3
ANSC 4314Food Quality Assurance3
BIOL 2420Microbiology for Non-Science Majors4
CHEM 1407Fundamentals of Chemistry4
FDSC 1307Concepts and Controversies in Food Studies3
FDSC 1316Principles of Food Preparation3
FDSC 3304Food Processing3
FDSC 3325Advanced Meal Management3
HECO 1322Nutrition and Diet Therapy3
NUTR 3321Life Cycle Nutrition3
NUTR 4315Medical Nutrition Therapy3
SOIL 2375Soil as the Basis for Society3
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
WSES 3309Aquaponics3
WSES 3315Sustainability3
WSES 3319Composting3
WSES 3375Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion3
WSES 4324Organic Agriculture3
WSES 4408Sustainable Food Systems4
Support field electives (3 hours must be advanced) 212
Total Hours73
Pre-veterinary Medicine
AGRI 1419General Animal Science4
BIOL 1406Biology for Science Majors4
BIOL 3303Genetics3
or AGRI 3409 Genetics
BIOL 3407Microbiology4
BIOL 4374Biochemistry I3
CHEM 1411 [shared] College Chemistry I
CHEM 1412 [shared] College Chemistry II
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I4
CHEM 2425Organic Chemistry II4
COMM 1315 [shared] Public Speaking
MATH 2412 [shared] Precalculus Math
Additional Hour from MATH 24121
MATH 3450Principles of Bio-Statistics4
PHYS 1401
PHYS 1402
College Physics I
and College Physics II
8
PSYC 2301 [shared] General Psychology
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
WSES 2322Principles of Wildlife Conservation and Management3
WSES 3310Wildlife Management Techniques3
WSES 3311Wildlife Diseases3
or WSES 3303 Veterinary Entomology
WSES 4301Population Dynamics, Modeling, and Analysis3
WSES 4302 [WI] Habitat Management3
ANSC 4306Animal Nutrition3
Choose one of the following:3
Fish and Wildlife Laws and Administration
Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management
Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources
Choose two of the following:6
Fisheries Conservation and Management
Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
Natural History of the Vertebrates
Big Game Ecology and Management
Avian Ecology and Management
Ethology
Ornithology
Herpetology
Mammalogy
Elective: 3
Choose 3 hours from WSES 3XXX or 4XXX
Total Hours73
Food and Nutrition
MATH 1314 [shared] College Algebra
BIOL 2401
BIOL 2402 [shared]
Anatomy and Physiology I
and Anatomy & Physiology II
ANSC 4300 [WI] Research and Writing in Animal Science3
BIOL 3407Microbiology4
CHEM 1411
CHEM 1412
College Chemistry I
and College Chemistry II
8
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I4
CHEM 4374Biochemistry I3
FDSC 1307Concepts and Controversies in Food Studies3
FDSC 1316Principles of Food Preparation3
HECO 1322Nutrition and Diet Therapy3
FDSC 3304Food Processing3
NUTR 3321Life Cycle Nutrition3
NUTR 3325Advanced Meal Management 3
NUTR 4315Medical Nutrition Therapy3
FDSC 4335Food and Culture3
FDSC 4408Sustainable Food Systems4
WSES 3323Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources3
or PHIL 3301 Ethics in the Professions
ANSC 1202Barbeque Science2
ANSC 4314Food Quality Assurance3
PBHL 3310Principles of Health Promotion and Education3
Choose one of the following:4
Agronomy
and Agronomy Laboratory
General Animal Science
Choose at least three courses and 8 hours from the following:8
Meat Science
Meat Processing and Merchandising
Value-Added Processed Meats
Biochemistry II
Aquaponics
Sustainability
Seminar in the Natural Resource Sciences
Vegetable Production
Organic Agriculture
Crop Production and Management
Fermentation and Brewing
Total Hours73
Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture
MATH 1314 [shared] College Algebra
BIOL 1406
BIOL 1407 [shared]
Biology for Science Majors
and Biology for Science Majors II
BIOL 3407Microbiology4
BIOL 3420Plant Pathology4
BIOL 3436Plant Physiology4
CHEM 1411College Chemistry I4
CHEM 1412College Chemistry II4
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I4
Environmental Policy Requirement (choose one):3
Environmental Politics
International Environmental Issues
Environmental Law
AGEC 2317 [shared] Introductory Agricultural Economics
HORT 1301Horticulture3
or AGRI 1307
AGRI 1107
Agronomy
and Agronomy Laboratory
WSES 2301General Entomology3
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
WSES 3309Aquaponics3
HORT 4301Greenhouse and Nursery Management3
or WSES 2451 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
WSES 3315Sustainability3
WSES 3319Composting3
WSES 3380Integrated Pest Management3
or WSES 4308 Horticultural Entomology
SOIL 3301
SOIL 3101
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
4
WSES 4316Pesticides3
or WSES 3415 Weed Management
WSES 4323Vegetable Production3
WSES 4324Organic Agriculture3
WSES 4325Crop Production and Management3
or HORT 4303 Greenhouse Crop Production
HORT 3300Plant Propagation3
or SOIL 4450 Soil Nutrient Cycling
Upper-level Elective:2
Choose two hours WSES, SOIL, or HORT 3XXX or 4XXX
Total Hours73
Fisheries Science
BIOL 1406
BIOL 1407 [shared]
Biology for Science Majors
and Biology for Science Majors II
MATH 1342 [shared] Elementary Statistical Methods
MATH 2412Precalculus Math4
or MATH 1316 Plane Trigonometry
CHEM 1411College Chemistry I4
Physical Science Elective (choose 4 hours):4
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
College Chemistry II
Oceanography
Biogeography
Physical Geology
Historical Geology
Introduction to Environmental Science
Natural Disasters
College Physics I
PHIL 2303 [shared] Introduction to Logic
BIOL 3303Genetics3
or AGRI 3409 Genetics
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
WSES 2322Principles of Wildlife Conservation and Management3
WSES 2451Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
WSES 3309Aquaponics3
WSES 3340Fisheries Conservation and Management3
WSES 3308Analysis of Natural Resource Data3
WSES 3320Watershed Management3
Botany requirement (choose one):4
Wildland Plant Identification and Ecology
Dendrology and Woody Plant Identification
Plant Taxonomy
Phycology
Choose two of the following:6
Veterinary Entomology
Wildlife Diseases
Natural History of the Vertebrates
Ethology
Invertebrate Zoology
Parasitology
Herpetology
Human Dimensions and Environmental Policy Requirement (choose two; at least one must be [WI])6
Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources
Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion
Fish and Wildlife Laws and Administration
Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management
Water Resources Policy and Management
Environmental Politics
International Environmental Issues
Environmental Law
BIOL 3407Microbiology4
BIOL 3340Introduction to Marine Biology3
or BIOL 4441 Limnology
BIOL 4462Ichthyology4
WSES 4301Population Dynamics, Modeling, and Analysis3
WSES Electives:5
Choose at least five hours from WSES 3XXX or 4XXX.
Total Hours73
1

Students must have credit for MATH 1314 or be concurrently enrolled in order to register for MATH 1316; however, MATH 1314 is NOT required for MATH 2412.

2

 Student must work with departmental advisor for approval of support field electives.

3

 If a student wishes to obtain certification as a Certified Ecological Restoration Practitioner, they should choose WSES 3310 and an upper-level SOIL course as their two electives.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Environmental Sciences

Required Courses
Students must take 2 Writing Intensive Courses in order to graduate
General Education Requirements42
ENGL 1301 [shared] [WI] Composition I
ENGL 1302 [shared] [WI] Composition II
GOVT 2305 [shared] Federal Government (Federal Constitution and Topics)
GOVT 2306 [shared] Texas Government (Texas Constitution and Topics)
BIOL 1406 [shared] Biology for Science Majors
CHEM 1411 [shared] College Chemistry I
GEOL 1403Physical Geology4
MATH 1342 [shared] Elementary Statistical Methods
GEOL 1407Introduction to Environmental Science4
MATH 2412Precalculus Math4
or MATH 1316 Plane Trigonometry
WSES 3406Wildland Plant Identification and Ecology4
or WSES 3408 Dendrology and Woody Plant Identification
BIOL 1407Biology for Science Majors II4
ENVS 2451Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
ENGL 3309 [WI] Technical writing and Document Design3
EASC 4313 [WI] Environmental Techniques3
or WSES 4313 Vegetation Measurement, Inventory, and Monitoring
SOIL 3301
SOIL 3101
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
4
WSES 3320Watershed Management3
Select 3 credits of the following:3
Undergraduate Research
Undergraduate Research in the Natural Resource Sciences
Environmental Science Internship
Internship in the Natural Resource Sciences
Environmental Science Field Study
Natural Resource Field Studies
Study Abroad
ENVS 1100 [shared] Transitioning to University Studies and Environmental Science
or WSES 1100 Transitioning to University Studies in the Natural Resource Sciences
ENVS 4187Environmental Science Capstone1
or WSES 4187 Senior Capstone Seminar
Total Hours87
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Science
CHEM 1412College Chemistry II4
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I 14
or CHEM 4477 Environmental Chemistry
POLS 3310 [WI] Environmental Politics3
or POLS 4311 Environmental Law
WSES 3308Analysis of Natural Resource Data3
Choose one of the following:3
Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources
Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion
Sustainability
Environmental Sociology
Environmental Economics
Water Resources Policy and Management
Environmental Communication
Environmental Ethics
International Environmental Issues
Environmental Law
Physical Sciences: Select at least 11 hours from the following:11
Soils, Land Use, and The Environment
Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification
Soil Physical Properties
Soil Nutrient Cycling
Limnology
Oceanography
Environmental Science
Environmental Chemistry 1
Geomorphology
Life Sciences: Select at least 1 of the following courses2
Aquaponics
Plant Diversity and Conservation
Natural History of the Vertebrates
Ecological Restoration of Plant Communities
Plant-Animal Interactions
Fire Ecology
Soil Ecology
Microbiology
Plant Taxonomy
Introduction to Marine Biology
Upper-level Electives:3
Select 3 hours from WSES, ENVS, EASC, CHEM, or GEOL 3XXX or 4XXX courses.
Total Hours33
Geospatial Information Science
ENVS 3305GIS for Natural Resource Scientists3
GEOG 3451Advanced Geographic Information Systems4
Choose at least 9 credits of the following courses9
Advanced GIS Applications
Remote Sensing
Applied Remote Sensing
C# Programming
POLS 3310 [WI] Environmental Politics3
or POLS 4311 Environmental Law
Environment and Society: Select 1 of the following courses3
Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources
Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion
Sustainability
Water Resources Policy and Management
Environmental Communication
Environmental Sociology
Environmental Economics
Environmental Ethics
International Environmental Issues
Life Sciences: Select at least 1 of the following courses2
Soil Ecology
Aquaponics
Plant Diversity and Conservation
Natural History of the Vertebrates
Ecological Restoration of Plant Communities
Plant-Animal Interactions
Fire Ecology
Introduction to Marine Biology
Microbiology
Plant Taxonomy
Physical Sciences: Select at least 2 of the following courses5
Soils, Land Use, and The Environment
Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification
Soil Physical Properties
Soil Nutrient Cycling
Limnology
Environmental Chemistry
Oceanography
Geomorphology
Environmental Science
Upper-level Electives:4
Select 4 hours from WSES, ENVS, EASC, CHEM, GEOG, or GEOL 3XXX or 4XXX courses.
Total Hours33
Environmental Policy
ECON 1301 [shared] Introduction To Economics
SOCI 4302 [WI] Methods of Social Research3
POLS 4310 [WI] International Environmental Issues3
ECON 3304Environmental Economics3
POLS 3310 [WI] Environmental Politics3
POLS 4311 [WI] Environmental Law3
SOCI 1301Introductory Sociology3
SOCI 3312Environmental Sociology3
Environment and Society - Select at least 2 of the following courses6
Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources
Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion
Sustainability
Water Resources Policy and Management
Environmental Communication
Environmental Ethics
Select at least one of the following courses2
Soils, Land Use, and The Environment
Aquaponics
Plant Diversity and Conservation
Natural History of the Vertebrates
Plant-Animal Interactions
Fire Ecology
Soil Ecology
Soil Physical Properties
Soil Nutrient Cycling
Introduction to Marine Biology
Microbiology
Plant Taxonomy
Limnology
Oceanography
Geomorphology
Environmental Chemistry
Upper-level Electives:4
Select 4 hours from WSES, ENVS, EASC, CHEM, POLS, or GEOL 3XXX or 4XXX courses. 2
Total Hours33
1

 CHEM 4477 can only be used once to fulfill degree requirements in this concentration.

2

To obtain the Environmental Policy Certificate, students should choose CHEM 1412 and CHEM 2423 as their electives.

Minor in Wildlife Management

Required Courses
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
WSES 2322Principles of Wildlife Conservation and Management3
WSES 3310Wildlife Management Techniques3
WSES 4302 [WI] Habitat Management3
Select one of the following:3
GIS for Natural Resource Scientists
Wildland Plant Identification and Ecology
Dendrology and Woody Plant Identification
Wildlife Diseases
Fish and Wildlife Laws and Administration
Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management
Population Dynamics, Modeling, and Analysis
Population Genetics
Urban Wildlife and Fisheries
Big Game Ecology and Management
Avian Ecology and Management
Southern African Ecology and Culture
Ethology
Select one of the following:4
Ornithology
Herpetology
Mammalogy
Total Hours20

Minor in Plant Conservation

Required Courses
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
WSES 3406Wildland Plant Identification and Ecology4
or WSES 3408 Dendrology and Woody Plant Identification
WSES 3313Plant Diversity and Conservation3
WSES 4302 [WI] Habitat Management3
WSES 4303Ecological Restoration of Plant Communities3
Choose one of the following:3-4
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
Watershed Management
Plant-Animal Interactions
Fire Ecology
Total Hours20

Minor in Soil Science

Required Courses
SOIL 3301
SOIL 3101
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
4
SOIL 3302Soils, Land Use, and The Environment3
SOIL 3412Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification4
SOIL 4450Soil Nutrient Cycling4
Choose one of the following:3-4
Soil Ecology
and Soil Physical Properties
GIS for Natural Resource Scientists
Watershed Management
Total Hours18-19

Minor in Agroecology

Required Courses
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
SOIL 3301
SOIL 3101
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
4
HORT 1301Horticulture3
or AGRI 1307
AGRI 1107
Agronomy
and Agronomy Laboratory
WSES 2301General Entomology3
or WSES 3415 Weed Management
HORT 3300Plant Propagation3
or SOIL 4450 Soil Nutrient Cycling
Choose one of the following:3
Crop Production and Management
Greenhouse Crop Production
Organic Agriculture
Vegetable Production
Composting
Sustainability
Aquaponics
Total Hours20

Minor in Crop Science

Required Courses
WSES 2301General Entomology3
AGRI 1307
AGRI 1107
Agronomy
and Agronomy Laboratory
4
Choose one of the following:
Integrated Pest Management
Pesticides
Turfgrass Management & Irrigation
WSES 4325Crop Production and Management3
SOIL 3301
SOIL 3101
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
4
BIOL 3420Plant Pathology4
or BIOL 3436 Plant Physiology
Total Hours18

Minor in Natural Resource Ecology

Required Courses
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers3-4
or RNRM 3315 Range Ecology
RNRM 3301Principles of Range Management3
WSES 3406Wildland Plant Identification and Ecology4
or WSES 3408 Dendrology and Woody Plant Identification
WSES 4309 [WI] Plant-Animal Interactions3
Choose two courses from the following:6-7
Range Improvement and Development
GIS for Natural Resource Scientists
Plant Diversity and Conservation
Watershed Management
Ecological Restoration of Plant Communities
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
Principles of Wildlife Conservation and Management
Fire Ecology
Total Hours19-20

Minor in Environmental Science

Required Courses
GEOG 2451Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
GEOL 1407Introduction to Environmental Science4
Select one of the following3
Environmental Science
Soils, Land Use, and The Environment
Select one of the following3-4
Environmental Techniques
Soil Science
and Soil Science Laboratory
GIS for Natural Resource Scientists
Watershed Management
Select one of the following3-4
Ecology for Natural Resource Managers
Ecology
Select one of the following3
Environmental Politics
Environmental Communication
Environmental Sociology
Environmental Economics
Total20-22

Minor in Fisheries Management

Required Courses
WSES 2405Ecology for Natural Resource Managers4
WSES 3340Fisheries Conservation and Management3
WSES 3309Aquaponics3
BIOL 4462Ichthyology4
BIOL 4441Limnology4
or BIOL 3340 Introduction to Marine Biology
Total Hours18

Food and Nutrition

Required Courses
Select six of the following courses, at least six hours must be at the 3000 or 4000 level:18
Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomy & Physiology II
Concepts and Controversies in Food Studies
Food Processing
Food and Culture
Sustainable Food Systems
Nutrition and Diet Therapy
Principles of Food Preparation
Life Cycle Nutrition
Advanced Meal Management
Medical Nutrition Therapy
Total Hours18

Agriculture Courses

AGRI 1100. Transitioning to University Studies in Environmental and Agricultural Management. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, aid in the development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, and encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective.

AGRI 1107. Agronomy Laboratory. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

This laboratory-based course accompanies AGRI 1307. Laboratory activities will reinforce the fundamental principles in the development, production, and management of field crops including growth and development, climate, plant requirements, pest management, and production methods. Pre-requisite: AGRI 1307 or concurrent enrollment. Prerequisite: AGRI 1307 or concurrent enrollment.

AGRI 1307. Agronomy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles and practices in the development, production, and management of field crops including growth and development, climate, plant requirements, pest management, and production methods.

AGRI 1309. Microcomputer Applications in Agriculture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Microcomputer technology applied to management, record keeping, and agribusiness. Emphasis on the application of database, spreadsheet, and other business software in various agricultural environments. Lab fee $2.

AGRI 1311. Dairy Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

A survey of the dairy industry, dairy breeds, standards for selection and culling, herd replacements, feeding, management, and health maintenance. The food value, composition and quality, utilization, and processing of market milk and dairy products will be discussed.

AGRI 1419. General Animal Science. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The scientific study of animal agriculture involving beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and horses. Topics covered will include general management practices, reproduction, nutrition, health, handling, genetic selection, shelter/housing and marketing strategies and procedures. Lab fee: $2.

AGRI 2301. Agricultural Power Units. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Fundamentals of internal combustion engine operation to include gasoline, diesel, and liquefied petroleum. Preventative maintenance and general servicing of tractor engine systems: intake & exhaust; fuel; lubrication; cooling; electrical; power trains; and hydraulic. Also covered are tractor tune-up; small engine operation maintenance & reconditioning; and plumbing & irrigation power systems. Lab fee $15.

AGRI 2303. Agricultural Construction I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A course designed to acquaint students with principles and application of carpentry, tool maintenance, tool and hardware nomenclature, preparation of drawings and bills of materials, blueprint reading, and the preparation and use of concrete. Also included are maintenance needs for the home and agricultural buildings. Lab fee $8.

AGRI 2304. Introductory Metals and Welding. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Cold metal work, soldering, pipe fitting, tool conditioning, hardware nomenclature, arc and oxyacetylene welding. Lab fee $25.

AGRI 2317. Introductory Agricultural Economics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to economics principles and concepts in agriculture today as they relate to the American economic system. Emphasis will be on management problem-solving techniques under various situations, especially those agricultural in nature,including producing, processing, distributing, and consuming farm and ranch products.

AGRI 2330. Wildlife Conservation and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles and practices used in the conservation and management of wildlife resources. Aesthetic, ecological, and recreational uses of public and private lands. Intended for non-wildlife and non-science majors; will not count toward Wildlife Science option in the BS in Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences and is not a prerequisite for advanced WSES courses.

AGRI 3302. Feeding and Management of Dairy Cattle. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Fundamental principles of scientific dairying and the practical application of these principles in the feeding and management of dairy cattle. Requirements for economical dairying, herd improvement through selection, feeding for milk production, development of replacement stock and disease control. Prerequisite: AGRI 1311. Lab fee $2.

AGRI 3409. Genetics. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Fundamental principles of genetics: variation, heredity, and interaction of genes, linkage, sex linkage, and mutation. Special emphasis given to breeding of farm crops and domestic animals. Laboratory includes demonstration of Mendelian ratios with field crops and Drosophila and an introduction to statistical methods as applied to agricultural research. Prerequisite: BIOL 1406 or 1407 and junior classification. Lab fee $7.

Environmental Science Courses

ENVS 1100. Transitioning to University Studies and Environmental Science. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, aid in the development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, and encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective.

ENVS 1301. Society, Natural Resources, and the Environment. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides a broad overview of the role of the environment and natural resources in human society, with particular emphasis on Texas and the United States. A history of the environmental movement is presented. Students study the importance of natural resources in providing basic human necessities, and how these resources are managed. Various careers in environmental science, natural resource management, and wildlife conservation are also discussed.

ENVS 2185. Environmental Seminar II. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Interactive discussions of current topics and developments relevant to environmental issues, including water quality protection, land management and restoration, and environmental policy. Students will discuss research papers and news articles, leading to a final presentation. Prerequisite: Sophomore major or minor in ENVS.

ENVS 2451. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This is a cross-listed course with GEOG 2451 Intro to GIS. Basic concepts of design, planning and implementation of geographic information systems. Students will learn how to create, manipulate, project, and interpret geographic information. Students are encouraged to take GEOG 1451: Pre-GIS before this course. Lab fee: $2.

ENVS 3185. Environmental Seminar III. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Advanced discussion of current developments relevant to environmental issues. Students will discuss research papers and news articles, leading to a final paper and presentation. Prerequisites: Junior classification with a major in ENVS.

ENVS 3302. Soils, Land Use, and The Environment. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will examine the interactions among soil physical, chemical, and biological process affecting soil, water, and environmental quality. These interactions will be addressed in relation to land use management practices such as erosion control, soil conservation, soil reclamation, riparian buffers, bioswales, and artificial wetlands. Throughout the course, land use planning tools, including WebSoil Survey and GIS will be used. Prerequisites: WSES/ENVS/SOIL 3401, WSES/ENVS/SOIL 3301, or WSES/ENVS/SOIL 2375 and consent of the instructor.

ENVS 3305. GIS for Natural Resource Scientists. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An intermediate course on the use of geographic information systems (GIS) in natural resource management. Builds on concepts learned in introductory GIS course. Laboratory exercises will apply knowledge learned in lectures to solve real world problems in natural resource management using GIS software. Prerequisite: WSES 2451.

ENVS 3307. Systems Thinking. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course focuses on the examination and analysis of complex systems, particularly in the environmental, natural resources, and sustainability fields. Major topics will include system structure, system behavior, feedback loops, stock and flow models, non-linear and emergent properties, self-organization, and the application of systems thinking to problem-solving. A significant component of the course will be development and analysis of computer models of complex systems. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1314 or equivalent, or approval of the instructor.

ENVS 3315. Sustainability. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Explore the varied perspectives of sustainability and analyze factors that contribute to or decrease system sustainability. Investigation of the social, economic, and environmental barriers to achieving sustainable systems and options for overcoming these barriers. Credit will not be awarded for both ENVS 3315 and WSES 3315.

ENVS 3323. Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will examine the several major ethical issues facing agriculture and natural resources sciences in our current society. Readings, discussions and lectures will focus on the scientific, capitalistic, and philosophical motivation in common ethical issues. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to construct and dissect ethical arguments and hopefully become more aware of the ethical dilemmas we all face each day. Can receive credit for WSES 3323, ENVS 3323 or ANSC 3323.

ENVS 3375. Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles and philosophies associated with the development, management, and use of natural resources are studied in the relationship to the ecological and social implications inherent in management alternatives involving the natural environmental and the use of renewable natural resources. Can receive credit for either ENVS 3375 or WSES 3375. Prerequisite: Junior classification.

ENVS 4084. Environmental Science Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-6 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Formally arranged and approved on-the-job training with a cooperating sponsor in government or private sector of the environmental field. A minimum of 40 hours of training is required for each hour of academic credit. A maximum of six hours of credit may be earned. Oral and written reports of the experience are required. Prerequisite: advanced standing and approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior classification and approval of the instructor.

ENVS 4086. Environmental Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Independent study or research of current topics in student's major. Content and credit dependant on depth of study. May be repeated for credit subject to approval of program lead or department head as appropriate.

ENVS 4088. Undergraduate Research. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-6 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Fundamental research methods will be addressed through a faculty-directed project. Participation in an abbreviated lecture series may be required. Project components may include a literature review, data collection and analysis, testing, planning, project design, and/or computer modeling. the student may be required to prepare a final report and produce a presentation. Prerequisites: approval of the instructor. Prerequsite: Approval of the instructor.

ENVS 4185. Seminar. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

A review of current problems and developments in environmental arena. Discussions of current literature and research. May be repeated once for credit.

ENVS 4187. Environmental Science Capstone. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Integrate and use fundamental concepts learned in previous environmental science courses to research and analyze real-world environmental issues. Oral and written reports on experiential learning, supplemented by appropriate internet and multimedia materials.

ENVS 4340. Environmental Science Field Study. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A field course involving visits to environmental science businesses, agencies, and organizations including TCEQ, watershed management organizations, river authorities, energy companies, and environmental advocacy organizations to learn about their work and engage in hands-on assessment activities. Requires an extended field trip at student’s expense. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in either WSES 2405 or BIOL 4401.

ENVS 4387. Environmental Science Capstone. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will integrate and use fundamental concepts learned in previous environmental science courses to research and analyze real-world environmental issues. Students will present oral and written reports on their research, supplemented by appropriate internet and multimedia materials, as well as portfolios documenting their research. Prerequisite: Senior classification with a major in ENVS.

ENVS 4390. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Food Science Courses

FDSC 1307. Concepts and Controversies in Food Studies. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Principles of food studies and exploration of the role food narratives and exposés play in the consumer’s perception of the current food supply. Foundation for understanding the connections among food production, ecology, ethics, cuisine, nutrition and health within the framework of sustainability. Can receive credit for either FDSC 1307 or WSES 1307.

FDSC 1316. Principles of Food Preparation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Study of food, food composition, and scientific principles involved in food preparation. Can receive credit for either FDSC 1316 or NUTR 1316.

FDSC 3304. Food Processing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

The world food supply, trends and traditions in diet and food sanitation, safety, security, and biotechnology, and impact of processing on diet quality. Lab fee: $2.

FDSC 3325. Advanced Meal Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Fundamentals of nutrition and food preparation in all types of meal service. Special emphasis is on time and money management. Credit will be given for only one of the following: WSES 3325, FDSC 3325, or NUTR 3325.

FDSC 4335. Food and Culture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A study of the food beliefs and practices of the major ethnic and religious groups in the U. S. and the nutritional implications of these food practices, a cultural analysis of American food trends; ethnic issues and dietary changes; and research methods in food habits. Credit will only be given for WSES 4335 or FDSC 4335.

FDSC 4407. Fermentation and Brewing. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

History of food safety, sanitation, fermentation, fermented foods, beer brewing, wine and cheese making, along with an introduction to industry organization; from commodities production, to processing, distribution, marketing, and sales. Hands-on instruction in small-scale brewing. Combines elements of science (chemistry, biology, and physics), economics, food preparation, aesthetics, preferences, and taste. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student. Credit will not be given for both WSES 4407 and FDSC 4407. Prerequisites: 8 hrs BIOL and 8 hrs CHEM; must be 21 years or age or older on the first class day to enroll in course.

FDSC 4408. Sustainable Food Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Issues surrounding food production and the environmental and social impact of current food production systems. Emerging trends to increase the sustainability of food production, distribution, and consumption. Includes a laboratory field component and will require some field work outside normal class times. Credit will not be given for both WSES 4408 and FDSC 4408.

Home Economics Courses

HECO 1322. Nutrition and Diet Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

(TCCNS = HECO 1322 or BIOL 1322) A study of the essential nutrients, including nutrient functions, food sources, deficiency symptoms, and toxicity symptoms; the nutritional requirements of individuals throughout the life cycle; the effects of nutrition on health and fitness; nutrition fads and controversies; and evaluation of personal eating habits. Prerequisite Course(s): One semester of chemistry is recommended.

HECO 1325. Housing and Interior Design I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

(TCCNS = HECO 1325) Factors influencing design selection with emphasis on the fundamental structure and decorative qualities of design, psychological approach to color, and creative problem-solving.

HECO 1328. Clothing Selection, Design and Construction. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

(TCCNS = HECO 1328) Principles of clothing construction taught through lecture, demonstration, instructional media, and hands-on laboratory experience. Students are required to construct personal garments and to produce samples illustrating various construction techniques. Lab fee $15. Prerequisite Course(s): FCSC 1201: Basic Clothing Construction.

HECO 2311. Fashion Merchandising. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

(TCCNS = HECO 2311) An introductory overview of the fashion business and its scope, economic importance, and marketing practices. The power of fashion and the role of the ultimate consumer are also addressed. Field trips may be required.

Horticulture Courses

HORT 1301. Horticulture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to the horticulture industry and the career opportunities that are available. The course includes an introduction to plant classification and structure, greenhouse construction and management, orchard and vegetable crops, and plant propagation.

HORT 3300. Plant Propagation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Principles of propagating plants, including vegetables, ornamentals, and fruits. Methods of handling seed; starting plants by the use of cuttings, layers, buds, grafts, and bulbs; ways of propagating specific plants; factors influencing growth of plants after transplanting. Prerequisites: BIOL 1406 and HORT 1301. Lab fee $2.

HORT 3301. Landscape Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Planting design and use of plants in the landscape. Use of drafting instruments, preparation of plans, perspective drawings, and cost estimates. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Lab fee $2.

HORT 3320. Landscaping and Gardening Practices. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles of landscape, interior, and floral design. Plant identification, environmental requirements, and culture. Prerequisite: HORT 1301 or equivalent. Lab fee: $2.

HORT 3360. Horticulture Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Principles of landscape, interior, and floral design. Plant identification, environmental requirements, and culture. Prerequisite: HORT 1301 or equivalent. Lab fee $2.

HORT 3370. Floriculture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Principles and basic techniques in floral design and merchandising, introduction to the floral branch of the horticulture industry and floral production.

HORT 3390. Horticultural Plants. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Identification, classification, and characteristics of horticultural plants. Includes the study of trees, shrubs, aroids, cacti, bromeliads, ferns, begonias, and orchids. Prerequisite: HORT 1301 or equivalent or approval of department head. Lab fee $2.

HORT 4086. Horticultural Problems. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-4 Hours).

Individualized study of current topics in student's major concentration of study or supporting discipline. Specific content and credit dependent upon student's interest, needs, and depth of study. Maximum undergraduate credit, four semester hours. Prerequisite: Senior classification and advance approval by instructor of record.

HORT 4090. Special Topics. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Special Topics. (Credit-variable) Deals with selected topics in agriculture or horticulture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, with a maximum of six hours counting towards the degree. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

HORT 4301. Greenhouse and Nursery Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

A study of the variables affecting greenhouse and nursery crop production. Both economic and physical variables will be explored. Particular emphasis will be placed on management techniques used by commercial establishments in producing and marketing ornamental nursery and greenhouse plants. Prerequisites: HORT 1301 and 3300. Lab fee $2.

HORT 4303. Greenhouse Crop Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Principles of propagating various plant materials, vegetative propagation methods, handling, starting, storing, and collecting seed, greenhouse management practices as related to propagation, production and maintenance of stock materials, crop scheduling, production, grading and distribution. Prerequisite: HORT 1301, HORT 3300, and HORT 4301.

HORT 4320. Landscaping with Native Plants. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Identification, characterization, and utilization of herbaceous and woody plants indigenous to Texas and other areas useful for landscaping purposes. Principles and procedures of xeriscaping will be emphasized. Field trips will be required. Prerequisite: HORT 1301. Lab fee $2.

HORT 4330. Horticultural Enterprises. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Horticultural business and educational enterprises will be visited or explored. Students are required to complete a business portfolio which will include photographs and written documents. Prerequisite: Jr or Sr classification. Lab fee: $2.

HORT 4350. Retail Horticulture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The establishment and management of a retail store with emphasis on plant display, care, and marketing in a retail environment, and on customer relations with respect to common home and landscape problems. Prerequisite: Junior classification or approval of department head. Lab fee $2.

Nutrition Courses

NUTR 1316. Principles of Food Preparation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Study of food, food composition, and scientific principles involved in food preparation. Can receive credit for either NUTR 1316 or FDSC 1316.

NUTR 3321. Life Cycle Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Explores in depth the contribution that diet and nutrition make to support growth and the development process throughout the life cycle. Examines the distinct set of nutritional priorities for each stage of the life cycle with a focus on health promotion and disease prevention as underlying lifetime goals. Prerequisite: WSES 1322 or HECO 1322.

NUTR 3325. Advanced Meal Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Fundamentals of nutrition and food preparation in all types of meal service. Special emphasis is on time and money management. Credit will be given for only one of the following: WSES 3325, FDSC 3325, or NUTR 3325.

NUTR 4315. Medical Nutrition Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Physiological basis and application of medical nutrition therapy using the nutrition care process as related to specific health conditions. Medical terminology, nutrition assessment techniques and case studies. May receive credit for either WSES 4315 or NUTR 4315. Prerequisite: HECO 1322.

Soil Science Courses

SOIL 2112. Soil Morphology. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Soil morphology, characterizations of soil, and judging of soils for various uses by field-based assessment. May receive credit for WSES 2112 or SOIL 2112.

SOIL 2375. Soil as the Basis for Society. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The underpinnings of the scientific principles of soils, how people have harmed them, and why everyone should be concerned with how we treat them. This course may not be used to fulfill the degree requirements for wildlife or ecosystem sciences.

SOIL 3101. Soil Science Laboratory. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Basic laboratory techniques used to analyze soil chemical, physical, and biological properties. Hands on examples will demonstrate core soil science principles. Prerequisites: ENVS 3301 or SOIL 3301 (or concurrent enrollment); and CHEM 1411, CHEM 1407, or CHEM 1409.

SOIL 3301. Soil Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Basic principles of soil science, including physical, biological, and chemical properties. Discussion will include soils applications in wildland, cropland, and developed environments. This course does not include a laboratory section. Credit will not be awarded for both this course and WSES 3401. Prerequisite: CHEM 1411, CHEM 1407, or CHEM 1409.

SOIL 3302. Soils, Land Use, and The Environment. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will examine the interactions among soil physical, chemical, and biological process affecting soil, water, and environmental quality. These interactions will be addressed in relation to land use management practices such as erosion control, soil conservation, soil reclamation, riparian buffers, bioswales, and artificial wetlands. Throughout the course, land use planning tools, including WebSoil Survey and GIS will be used. Prerequisites: WSES/ENVS/SOIL 3401, WSES/ENVS/SOIL 3301, or WSES/ENVS/SOIL 2375 and consent of the instructor.

SOIL 3319. Composting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The art and science of composting of agricultural, municipal, foodservice and household wastes to include composting techniques, waste products and feedstocks, aerobic vs. anaerobic processes, evaluation of composted products and their beneficial uses. Biological processes used to decompose organic materials will be studied. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

SOIL 3412. Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Soil development, classification, and mapping. Laboratory work will consist of field study of the morphological features of the soil profile and the mapping of designated areas using standardized methods. Student may receive credit for either WSES 3412 or SOIL 3412. Prerequisites: WSES 3401 or SOIL 3301 and SOIL 3101.

SOIL 4212. Soil Ecology. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Characterizations of organisms in the soil food web, analyses of interrelationships among soil organisms, and assessments of interactions between soil organisms and their environmental conditions. Credit will only be given for WSES 4212 or SOIL 4212. Prerequisites: WSES 2405 and WSES 3401 or SOIL 3301 and SOIL 3101.

SOIL 4213. Soil Physical Properties. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Soil physical characteristics and their relationship to soil management. Methods of measuring soil and soil conservation. Soil phases, soil water properties, particle size, clay and clay mineralogy, and environmental impacts. Credit will only be given for WSES 4213 or SOIL 4213. Prerequisites: WSES 3401 or SOIL 3301 and SOIL 3101.

SOIL 4450. Soil Nutrient Cycling. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Plant nutrition, soil nutrient cycling, and nutrient management. Soil biological, physical, and chemical properties and interactions with nutrient availability to crops and nutrient fate in the environment. Plant nutrition/soil fertility problems and corrective action, soil and nutrient management. Credit will only be given for WSES 4450 or SOIL 4450. Prerequisites: WSES 3401 or SOIL 3301 and SOIL 3101.

Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences Courses

WSES 1100. Transitioning to University Studies in the Natural Resource Sciences. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, aid in development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective, and introduce students to the field of wildlife, sustainability, and ecosystem sciences. Prerequisites: Major in WSES or approval of the instructor.

WSES 1119. Natural Resource Competition I. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides an introduction to various natural resource-based competitive events. Competition rules, conduct, and etiquette are discussed. The students are introduced to basic facts regarding their chosen field of study. Prerequisites: Approval of the instructor.

WSES 1301. Society, Natural Resources, and the Environment. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides a broad overview of the role of the environment and natural resources in human society, with particular emphasis on Texas and the United States. A history of the environmental movement is presented. Students study the importance of natural resources in providing basic human necessities, and how these resources are managed. Various careers in environmental science, natural resource management, and wildlife conservation are also discussed.

WSES 1305. Fundamentals of Crop Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Classification and distribution of farm crops; importance of food cultivars and good seed; crop improvement; preparation of seedbed, commercial fertilizers, manures, and lime; seeding practices; crop tillage; harvesting; meadow and pasture management; weeds; crop rotation; diseases and insect enemies. Lab fee $5.

WSES 1307. Concepts and Controversies in Food Studies. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles of food studies and exploration of the role food narratives and exposés play in the consumer’s perception of the current food supply. Foundation for understanding the connections among food production, ecology, ethics, cuisine, nutrition and health within the framework of sustainability. Can receive credit for either FDSC 1307 or WSES 1307.

WSES 2119. Natural Resource Competition II. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Intended for students with basic understanding of the conduct of their chosen natural resource event, this course provides more advanced study of the topic. Students expand upon the introductory material discussed in Natural Resource Competition I to include a wider array of natural resource science related facts and concepts. Prerequisites: WSES 1119 or approval of the instructor.

WSES 2301. General Entomology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Principal orders of insects; the relation of anatomy and physiology of insects to control methods; insecticides and their uses; development, habits, and economic importance of more common insects with control methods for the injurious species. Lab fee: $4.

WSES 2322. Principles of Wildlife Conservation and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An in-depth treatment of the fundamental principles of wildlife conservation and management, stressing the application of ecological principles to achieve wildlife management objectives. Topics include conservation, management, and restoration of wildlife habitats; wildlife population assessment and management; human dimensions and human-wildlife interactions; management of wildlife in agricultural, range, and forested ecosystems; and wildlife policy at the local, state, national, and international level. Provides knowledge and understanding required for advancing in the wildlife and natural resource conservation disciplines. Satisfies requirements for Wildlife Science majors. Prerequisite for advanced wildlife science courses. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in the following: MATH 1316 or MATH 2412; and WSES 2405, RNRM 3315, or BIOL 4401; or approval of the instructor.

WSES 2375. Soil as the Basis for Society. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The underpinnings of the scientific principles of soils, how people have harmed them, and why everyone should be concerned with how we treat them. This course may not be used to fulfill the degree requirements for wildlife or ecosystem sciences.

WSES 2405. Ecology for Natural Resource Managers. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A study of the interactions of plants, animals, and the environment and how these interactions respond to human influence. Emphasis will be placed on terrestrial ecosystems (rangelands, grasslands, deserts, wetlands, and forests), and specific interactions among species which can be manipulated to achieve management outcomes. The laboratory will have a significant outdoor field component. Credit will not be awarded for both WSES 2405 and WSES 3103. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1406 and either CHEM 1411, BIOL 1407, or GEOL 1407, or approval of the instructor.

WSES 2451. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Basic concepts of design, planning and implementation of geographic information systems. Students will learn how to create, manipulate, project, and interpret geographic information. Students are encouraged to take GEOG 1451: Pre-GIS before this course. Can receive credit for either WSES 2451, GEOG 2451, EASC 2451 or ENVS 2451. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 2470. Introduction to Turfgrass Science. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An introduction to turfgrass history, benefits, and use. Growth and development of various turfgrass species and their culture, including pest and disease management. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 3103. Ecological Field Methods Laboratory. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Field methodologies used in the investigation of ecological systems including terrestrial plant, terrestrial animal, and aquatic systems. For students who have completed an introductory ecology or environmental biology course with no laboratory component. Credit will not be offered for both WSES 3103 and WSES 2405. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in an approved 1000- or 2000-level ecology or environmental biology course; and a grade of C or better in BIOL 1406; and a grade of C or better in either BIOL 1407 or GEOL 1407; or approval of the department head.

WSES 3119. Natural Resource Competition III. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a more advanced treatment of the student’s chosen natural resource event. It is intended for students with experience in the competition, having participated in at least one competitive event. Prerequisite: WSES 2119 and approval of the instructor.

WSES 3303. Veterinary Entomology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Classification, biology, and control of arthropods associated with livestock and wildlife. Identification will be emphasized in the laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 1406 and BIOL 1407, or approval of the instructor.

WSES 3304. Food Processing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

The world food supply, trends and traditions in diet and food sanitation, safety, security, and biotechnology, and impact of processing on diet quality. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 3305. GIS for Natural Resource Scientists. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An intermediate course on the use of geographic information systems (GIS) in natural resource management. Builds on concepts learned in introductory GIS course. Laboratory exercises will apply knowledge learned in lectures to solve real world problems in natural resource management using GIS software. Prerequisite: WSES 2451 Lab fee $2.

WSES 3307. Systems Thinking. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course focuses on the examination and analysis of complex systems, particularly in the environmental, natural resources, and sustainability fields. Major topics will include system structure, system behavior, feedback loops, stock and flow models, non-linear and emergent properties, self-organization, and the application of systems thinking to problem-solving. A significant component of the course will be development and analysis of computer models of complex systems. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1314 or equivalent, or approval of the instructor. Lab fee: 2.

WSES 3308. Analysis of Natural Resource Data. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Application of statistical principles to the analysis of natural resource science data. Methods of designing studies, managing and analyzing data, and interpreting results. Descriptive statistics, estimation, inference, tests of significance, measurements of relationship and correlation, and non-parametric analyses. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 1342 or MATH 3450.

WSES 3309. Aquaponics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Students will examine the pros and cons of various aquaponics methods like raft, nutrient film, vertical towers, and media filled beds and their applications for growing fish and plants sustainably for a family/community or for profit. Students will construct a backyard aquaponics system, establish/harvest plants, and prepare a meal in laboratory. Topics covered are plant and fish choices and recommendations; planting/growing techniques; fish biology, stocking rates, and feeds; plant/fish care and health; water quality; system design, filtration and plumbing components; daily operation; greenhouse management/seasonal adjustments; system start up; food preparation; economics and business considerations.

WSES 3310. Wildlife Management Techniques. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Field and laboratory techniques used in wildlife management and research. Determining age and food habits, population analysis, habitat analysis, and introduction to research. Prerequisites: Grades of C or better in WSES 2322 and MATH 1316, or MATH 2412, or approval of instructor. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by student.

WSES 3311. Wildlife Diseases. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Basic mechanisms of disease as they occur in wildlife populations; interplay of environmental conditions, individual physiological requirements, and disease agents of various wildlife species. Epidemiology and management of infectious and non-infectious diseases. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in WSES 2322 or approval of instructor.

WSES 3313. Plant Diversity and Conservation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The course focuses on patterns and distribution of plant diversity and threats to plant diversity. The focus will be on plant communities found in a variety of range, forests, and other systems. Strategies and approaches used in plant conservation will be discussed. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in WSES 2405, or BIOL 4401, and junior classification; or approval of the instructor.

WSES 3314. Honey Production and Pollinator Ecology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course is designed for students interested in honey bee production. Topics discussed will include, honey bee biology, pollination ecology, honey bee hive management, disease and arthropod pest management, and the harvesting and marketing of honey, pollen, wax, and other honey bee products. Students will work with live bee colonies and they must provide their own vial and hive tools.

WSES 3315. Sustainability. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Explore the varied perspectives of sustainability and analyze factors that contribute to or decrease system sustainability. Investigation of the social, economic, and environmental barriers to achieving sustainable systems and options for overcoming these barriers. Credit will not be awarded for both ENVS 3315 and WSES 3315.

WSES 3319. Composting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The art and science of composting of agricultural, municipal, foodservice and household wastes to include composting techniques, waste products and feedstocks, aerobic vs. anaerobic processes, evaluation of composted products and their beneficial uses. Biological processes used to decompose organic materials will be studied. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

WSES 3320. Watershed Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Management and planning of range or forest land watersheds for maintenance or improvement of water and soil resources. Effects of vegetation and land management practices on water quality and quantity, erosion, and sedimentation. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in WSES 2405, or BIOL 4401.

WSES 3323. Ethical Issues in Agriculture and the Natural Resources. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will examine the several major ethical issues facing agriculture and natural resources sciences in our current society. Readings, discussions and lectures will focus on the scientific, capitalistic, and philosophical motivation in common ethical issues. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to construct and dissect ethical arguments and hopefully become more aware of the ethical dilemmas we all face each day.

WSES 3325. Advanced Meal Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Designed to apply the fundamentals of nutrition and food preparation in all types of meal service. Special emphasis is on time and money management. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 3340. Fisheries Conservation and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course addresses the fundamentals of fisheries management. Students will learn basic principles of fisheries management, including population estimation and management, harvest management, habitat management, applicable state and federal laws, invasive species management, and human dimensions. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MATH 1316, or MATH 2412, and either WSES 2405 or BIOL 4401; or approval of the instructor.

WSES 3375. Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles and philosophies associated with the development, management, and use of natural resources are studied in the relationship to the ecological and social implications inherent in management alternatives involving the natural environmental and the use of renewable natural resources. Prerequisite: junior classification.

WSES 3380. Integrated Pest Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to the basic tenets of integrated pest management emphasizing the ecologically sound use of chemical, biological, cultural, and physical control tactics in managing pests. Prerequisites: WSES 2301 and Junior or Senior classification, or approval of instructor of record.

WSES 3385. Fish and Wildlife Laws and Administration. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A review and analysis of state and federal laws and international treaties and conventions affecting fish and wildlife; their application and administration. The organizational structure of state, federal and international agencies; their objectives, policies and practices. Prerequisite: AGRI 2330, or WSES 2322 and junior classification.

WSES 3386. Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Today’s natural resource scientist must interact with diverse publics and stakeholders to achieve conservation goals. Few professionals receive training to navigate the murky waters of human dimensions of natural resources management. This course will give students an understanding of ways in which elements of human psychology and society shape our perceptions and management of wildlife and fisheries resources, and how to interact with these stakeholders to achieve ecologically-sound management and conservation. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in WSES 2322.

WSES 3401. Soils. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours). [WI]

Designed to acquaint the student with the field of soil science. Basic principles of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the soil and their general applications. Credit will not be awarded for both WSES 3401 and WSES 3101/3301. Prerequisites: CHEM 1411 and junior classification. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 3403. Natural History of the Vertebrates. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Survey of vertebrate taxa, including systematics, taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. Identification in laboratory and field. Students required to handle preserved and live specimens. Students required to bear the cost of multiple overnight and multi-day field trips. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1406 and BIOL 1407.

WSES 3406. Wildland Plant Identification and Ecology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Identification and classification of wildland plants in the United States, with emphasis on distribution, ecology, and economic value of species found in rangeland, forest, grassland, desert, and wetland systems in Texas. Proficiency in the use of a dichotomous key to identify plant species will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1406, BIOL 1407, and either WSES 2405, or BIOL 4401.

WSES 3408. Dendrology and Woody Plant Identification. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

The study of woody plants, including trees, shrubs, and vines, with an emphasis on species common to north central Texas. Morphological, ecological and phenological traits will be used in field identification. The distribution, habitat, ecology, and importance of these species to wildlife and people will be explored, including community dynamics and the effects of disturbance and succession. Proficiency in the use of a dichotomous key to identify plant species will be stressed. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIOL 1406 and BIOL 1407, or approval of instructor.

WSES 3415. Weed Management. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

General principles in the development of weed prevention and management programs. Common weed ecology and life cycles, land management factors, herbicide selection and performance, and cultural control strategies. Laboratory includes weed identification and herbicide application methods. Prerequisite: WSES 1305 Lab fee $2.

WSES 4084. Internship in the Natural Resource Sciences. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-6 Hours).

Formally arranged and approved on-the-job training with a cooperating sponsor in government of private sector of the natural resources or environmental field. A minimum of 75 hours of training is required for each hour of academic credit. A maximum of six hours of credit may be earned. Oral and written reports of the experience are required. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 4086. Problems in Natural Resource Sciences. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-6 Hours).

Individualized study of current topics in wildlife, natural resources, environmental science, or related discipline. Specific content and credit depend upon student’s interests, needs, and depth of study. May be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite: approval of instructor.

WSES 4088. Undergraduate Research in the Natural Resource Sciences. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-6 Hours).

Fundamental research methods will be addressed through a faculty-directed project. Participation in an abbreviated lecture series may be required. Project components may include a literature review, data collection and analysis, testing, planning, project design, and/or computer modeling. the student may be required to prepare a final report and produce a presentation. Prerequisites: Approval of the instructor.

WSES 4090. Special Topics in the Natural Resource Sciences. 6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0-6 Hours, Lab: 0-6 Hours).

Selected topics in wildlife, natural resources, environmental science, or related discipline. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: approval of instructor.

WSES 4119. Natural Resource Competition IV. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is intended for highly advanced students who have developed significant experience and competencies in their respective natural resource competition. Students will be expected to take a leadership role on the Tarleton State University Quiz Bowl Team and demonstrate significant ability during practice and competitive events. Prerequisite: WSES 3119 and approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: WSES 3119 and approval of the instructor.

WSES 4185. Seminar in the Natural Resource Sciences. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

A review of current issues and developments in natural resources or environmental sciences. Discussion of professional opportunities and responsibilities. Students will complete individual investigation and oral and written reports using scientific literature. Prerequisites: senior classification with a major in Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences; or approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: Senior classification with a major in Wildlife, Sustainability, and Ecosystem Sciences; or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4187. Senior Capstone Seminar. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This one-hour seminar is designed to provide students with skills at synthesizing and presenting the results of lower-division work, specifically applied learning experiences such as internships, undergraduate research, and study abroad. Course will include a writing and public speaking component. Prerequisites: Successful completion of WSES 4084, WSES 4088, WSES 4340, or WSES 4342, or approval of the Department Head.

WSES 4213. Soil Physical Properties. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Soil physical characteristics and their relationship to soil management; emphasis placed on methods of measuring soil and soil conservation. Topics covered include soil phases, soil water properties, particle size, clay and clay mineralogy, and environmental impacts. Prerequisite: WSES 3401.

WSES 4301. Population Dynamics, Modeling, and Analysis. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An introduction to population biology, including models of simple population growth, competition, and predator-prey interactions; demographic rates; and life tables. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in WSES 2322; and a grade of C or better in MATH 1342 or MATH 3450; or approval of instructor.

WSES 4302. Habitat Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Application of ecological principles to the management of native plant communities. Particular focus will be on plant ecology and physiology and their role in the conservation and management of wildlife habitat. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in WSES 2405, or BIOL 4401, and grade of C or better in WSES 2322, or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4303. Ecological Restoration of Plant Communities. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to landscape- scale, process-oriented approaches to ecological restoration. Topics include enhancing resource capture, techniques in re-vegetation, and restoration of historic vegetation. Prescribed fire and grazing as restoration and management techniques for range and forest systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 3415 or WSES 3406 or WSES 3408; and a grade of C or better in WSES 2405 or BIOL 4401; or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4304. Population Genetics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An exploration of the principles of population genetics. Lecture will be a discussion of factors affecting the dynamics of allelic frequencies and the population-level consequences of manipulating these factors. Lecture topics will include the effects of selection, mutation, population size and genetic drift, neutral theory, population structure, inbreeding, and linkage disequilibrium. A significant portion of the class will be dedicated to working on problem sets to provide an empirical connection to population genetic theories. Prerequisite: BIOL 3303, BIOL 3403, or AGRI 3409.

WSES 4305. Urban Wildlife and Fisheries. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course trains students to establish and maintain diverse, self-sustaining urban wildlife and fish populations at levels in harmony with ecological, social, an economic values of the human community and to develop optimal levels of public appreciation and use of urban wildlife an fish resources and associated habitats. Includes discussions on conservation education as a tool for furthering urban wildlife and fisheries appreciation.

WSES 4306. Water Resources Policy and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will present an overview of water policy, laws and regulations related to ecosystem resource management focusing on water quality, water quantity and water as habitat. Major US and Texas environmental laws regarding water will be covered including the respective agencies involved with regulations. Case studies will facilitate discussion of science-policy interactions with resource management in the implementation of these laws and regulations. Credit for SOCI 4306, WSES 4306, and SOCI 5306 will not be awarded.

WSES 4308. Horticultural Entomology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Identification, nature of injury, life history, and control of common insects and related arthropods attacking turf grasses, landscape plants, shade, fruit, and nut trees, and greenhouse succulents. Management and control strategies utilizing chemical, cultural, and biological control agents.

WSES 4309. Plant-Animal Interactions. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Plant-animal and animal-plant interactions are the basis for many ecosystem functions. This course tailors the study of those interactions to student interests from insects to ungulates, aquatic to terrestrial, managed to natural systems, and individual species to ecosystems. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in WSES 2405 or BIOL 4401 and junior classification, or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4311. Fire Ecology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course will address the ecological role of fire in natural systems, including rangelands, grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, and forests; adaptations of plants and animals to fire; long-term controls on wild fire; use of fire as an ecosystem management tool, with aspects of wildland firefighting; and prescribed burning, including fire behavior, fuels, weather, politics and policy. Students will gain hands-on prescribed burning experiences as circumstances and weather permit. Prerequisites: WSES 2405 or BIOL 4401, or approval of the instructor. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 4313. Vegetation Measurement, Inventory, and Monitoring. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Vegetation sampling, measurement, monitoring, inventory, study design, and quantitative and statistical analysis. Assessment of range condition and forest health based on understanding ecological processes. Hands-on, field-based laboratory. Prerequisite: WSES 3406 or WSES 3408.

WSES 4316. Pesticides. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of chemical pesticides. Emphasis will be on the chemistry, mode of action, and safe use of insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. Less common pesticides (rodenticides, piscicides, avicides, etc.) will also be reviewed. The use of chemical pesticides as a part of an integrated pest management program will be discussed. Student's successfully completing the course will be prepared to apply for the Texas Department of Agriculture pesticide applicator's license. Prerequisite: CHEM 1411.

WSES 4323. Vegetable Production. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The study of vegetable production techniques including site selection, nutritional requirements, insects, diseases and varieties. Emphasis will be placed on small scale gardening techniques, crop rotation, and layout and design parameters to maximize production on small land areas. Seasonal variations (spring, summer, fall and winter) that influence crop selection and management practices will be evaluated. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

WSES 4324. Organic Agriculture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Organic agriculture will examine a brief history of the industry development, changes in the structure and industry, USDA NOP rules and regulations, and certification to provide a scope of understanding for the course. The majority of the course will focus on the mechanics of crop and vegetable production in an organic system including seed sources, planting considerations, environment, soil fertility, plant nutrition, soil preparation, weed control methods, insect and disease prevention, rules in applications, harvest issues, and marketing.

WSES 4325. Crop Production and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Current concepts and practices in field crop production with emphasis on the applications of technology. Recognition and discussion of cultural practices, fertilization, irrigation, weed and pest control from economic and environmental perspectives. Review of crop improvement strategies and bio-engineering.

WSES 4326. Big Game Ecology and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Survey of the distributions and life histories of North American big game species. Detailed examination of the biology and habitat relationships of several big game species, especially as they relate to management. Other topics include population dynamics, diet, economic significance, and conservation strategies. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in WSES 2322, or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4327. Avian Ecology and Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

A study of major wild bird groups, their interactions with their environment, and how these interactions can be manipulated to achieve management objectives. Course emphasis will be on species of conservation significance, including game, nongame, and vulnerable species. Major topics will include population management of migratory and non-migratory birds, habitat management, and wildlife policy consideration unique to bird conservation. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in WSES 2322, junior classification or higher, or approval of the instructor. Lab fee: $20.

WSES 4335. Food and Culture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A study of the food beliefs and practices of the major ethnic and religious groups in the U. S. and the nutritional implications of these food practices, a cultural analysis of American food trends; ethnic issues and dietary changes; and research methods in food habits. Lab fee: $25.

WSES 4340. Natural Resource Field Studies. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A field course in which students capture, measure, and mark animals; collect descriptive measures of vegetation that characterizes wildlife habitat; and record field observations using a journal. This course requires a one-week field trip at student’s expense (in addition to the field experience fee). Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in WSES 2322 or approval of the instructor.

WSES 4341. Southern African Ecology and Culture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Ecology of southern Africa, including climate, soils, vegetation, and wildlife. Ecological interactions with development, agriculture, and tourism. Identification and ecology of bird and large mammal species. Conservation of rare, threatened, and endangered species. Culture, politics, and history from the pre-Colonial Period through today, with emphasis on their effects on management of natural resources. Focuses mainly on South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, and Namibia.

WSES 4342. Study Abroad. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Conducted at various domestic and international locations for extended periods (frequently outside the United States). Hands-on activities and experiences in agriculture and natural resources. Topics will vary. Enrollment requires a significant study abroad program fee.

WSES 4401. Ethology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

An introductory course in the behavior of animals, with emphasis on the natural selection, ontogeny, and function of behaviors as they relate to feeding, reproduction, predator-avoidance, and other traits. Both proximate (sensory, hormonal, genetic) and ultimate (ecological and evolutionary) mechanisms are addressed. Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 1406 and BIOL 1407, and a C or better in either AGRI 1419 or WSES 2322. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 4407. Fermentation and Brewing. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

This course provides a basic understanding of the history of food safety, sanitation, fermentation, fermented foods, beer brewing, wine and cheese making, along with an introduction to industry organization; from commodities production, to processing, distribution, marketing, and sales. The course provides direct hands-on instruction in small-scale brewing. It combines elements of science (chemistry, biology, and physics), economics, food preparation, aesthetics, preferences, and taste. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student. Prerequisites: Senior classification and completion of 8 hours of BIOL and 8 hours of CHEM; or approval of the instructor. Must be 21 years of age or older on the first class day to enroll in this course.

WSES 4408. Sustainable Food Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

This course will survey issues surrounding food production and examine the environmental and social impact of current food production systems. Specific emphasis will be placed on emerging trends to increase the sustainability of food production, distribution, and consumption. This course includes a laboratory field component and will require some field work outside normal class times. Lab fee: $2.

WSES 4410. Genomics. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

An exploration of practical applications for high throughput DNA sequencing technology. Hands-on research projects will provide experience in proper sample collection and preparation, automated robotic DNA library preparation, DNA barcoding, quality control metrics, instrument loading and run initiation, and an overview of data processing for a single instrument run generating hundreds of millions of DNA sequences. Prerequisite: BIOL 3303 or AGRI 3409 Lab fee: $2.

WSES 4450. Soil Nutrient Cycling. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Provides an understanding of plant nutrition, soil nutrient cycling, and nutrient management. Includes discussion of soil biological, physical, and chemical properties and interactions with nutrient availability to crops and nutrient fate in the environment. Students will identify plant nutrition/soil fertility problems and recommend corrective action, identify soil and nutrient management. Prerequisite: WSES 3401. Lab fee: $25.

WSES 4470. Turfgrass Management & Irrigation. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0-3 Hours, Lab: 0-2 Hours).

Characteristics and management of turfgrasses used for home lawns, recreational areas and sports fields. Turfgrass irrigation system design. Department recommends WSES 2470 to be taken prior to WSES 4470. Prerequisites: HORT 1301, WSES 1305, or instructor approval. Lab fee: $2.

Dr. T. Wayne Schwertner, Department Head
Department of Wildlife, Sustainability and Ecosystem Sciences
Joe W. Autry Agriculture Building, Room 201
Box T-0050
Stephenville, Texas 76402
(254) 968-9221
(254) 968-9228
schwertner@tarleton.edu
http://www.tarleton.edu/env-ag-mgmt/index.html

Professors

  • Breeden, Jeffrey Dr.
  • Cummings, Hennen Dr.
  • Dottavio, F. Dominic Dr.
  • McFarland, Anne Dr.
  • Muir, James Dr.

Associate professors

  • McGahan, Donald Dr.
  • McGregor, Kyle Dr.
  • Schwertner, T. Wayne Dr.

Assistant professors

  • Bellows, Barbara Dr.
  • Kafley, Hemanta Dr.
  • Mathewson, Heather Dr.
  • McKeehan, Paula Ms.
  • Murray, Darrel Dr.

Adjunct professors

  • Bardin, Steven Mr.
  • Kanine, Jen Dr.
  • Sharma, Mandira Ms
  • Stephens, Marsha Dr.
  • Tuggle, Justin Dr.