Air Force ROTC/Aerospace Studies

Department of Aerospace Studies – Air Force ROTC

Tarleton State University has a Crosstown Agreement with the U.S. Air Force and Texas Christian University’s Department of Aerospace Studies to provide AFROTC courses and scholarships for cadets attending Tarleton at the Stephenville Campus.  Classes and labs are taught at the TCU campus in Ft. Worth on Thursday afternoons from 1:00-6:00 pm.  Transportation is provided by the Office of the Commandant for all Tarleton AFROTC Cadets.  If you have any questions regarding the application process, contact the TCU AFROTC office at (817) 257-7461.

AEROSPACE STUDIES PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

A four-year program that enables Cadets to take advantage of four years of aerospace studies courses. Each semester, for the first two years, Cadets take a one-credit hour academic class and a one-credit hour Pass/No-Credit Leadership Laboratory (LLab). The first two years collectively are referred to as the General Military Course (GMC). Upon successful completion of the GMC and an ensuing four-week Air Force paid field training course, qualified and selected students may elect to enroll in the final two years, referred to as the Professional Officer Course (POC). Each semester in the POC, students take a three-credit hour academic class and a one-credit hour Pass/No-Credit LLab. AFROTC uniforms and textbooks are issued by the unit.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

  • •          Be a full-time student (12 semester hours or more)
  • •          Be a U.S. Citizen
  • •          Be in good physical condition/health
  • •          Have good moral character
  • •          Be no older than 34 years upon commissioning

AEROSPACE STUDIES

Enrollment in the General Military Course (first two years) is voluntary for eligible students and does not obligate non-scholarship students for further military service. The Professional Officer Course (last two years) is also voluntary but competitive. Because the Professional Officer Course leads to a commission in the U.S. Air Force, those selected to continue training will incur military obligation.

AFROTC BENEFITS

As Air Force ROTC cadets, students are entitled to selective benefits. Social and co-curricular activities, together with leadership and academic training, are all part of Air Force ROTC. Contracted Cadets receive a nontaxable subsistence allowance each month during the school year. The detachment sponsors a Civil Air Patrol where cadets can obtain front-seat and back-seat flying time in Cessna aircraft. Drill team, honor guard and Arnold Air Honor Society are just a few social outlets for the Cadets. Summer opportunities for Cadets can include a paid visit to a military installation for two weeks, freefall parachuting, combat survival training, flight nurse shadowing and Cadet training assistant duty at field training.

AFROTC SCHOLARSHIPS

Air Force ROTC offers scholarships that vary in length of award and amount based on academic major and applicant qualifications. All awarded scholarships pay a stipend for textbooks and fees, plus a monthly, nontaxable, stipend during the school year. Scholarship awards are based on specific academic majors related to the needs of the U.S. Air Force. These scholarship opportunities for in-college students are determined at the national level by Air Force ROTC and are subsequently administered by the detachment/Department of Aerospace Studies. Scholarship applicants are selected using the whole-person concept, which includes objective factors (i.e., GPA, standardized test scores (SAT/ACT), and physical fitness test) and subjective factors (i.e., personal evaluations). Students who are enrolled in Air Force ROTC generally improve their scholarship selection opportunity.

In addition to meeting the general qualifications mentioned above, scholarship applicants must be at least 17 years of age when the scholarship is activated and must be less than 31 years of age as of the end of their commissioning year. Because the scholarship program varies according to budget and needs of the Air Force, interested applicants should contact the Department of Aerospace Studies at (817) 257-7461 or www.afrotc.tcu.edufor specifics.

AFROTC COMMISSIONING

Upon successful completion of the AFROTC Program and baccalaureate or graduate degree, a Cadet is commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force. In some instances, active service can be delayed by students continuing in post-baccalaureate degree programs.

https://www.afrotc.com/

Courses

AEST 1101. Foundation of the US Air Force I. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Air Force AEST 1101 in the fall and AEST 1102 in the spring: A survey course designed to introduce students to the U.S. Air Force and Air Force ROTC. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, group leadership problems, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory L100 must be taken and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.

AEST 1102. Foundation of the US Air Force II. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Air Force AEST 1101 in the fall and AEST 1102 in the spring: A survey course designed to introduce students to the U.S. Air Force and Air Force ROTC. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, group leadership problems, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory L100 must be taken and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.

AEST 2101. Evolution of US Air & Space Power I. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Air and Space Power (AEST 2101 in the fall and AEST 2102 in the spring): A survey course designed to examine general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Utilizing this perspective, the course covers a time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities (competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension: e.g. Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power. As a whole, this course provides the student with a knowledge level understanding for the general element and employment of air and space power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. In addition, the students will continue to discuss the importance of the Air Force Core Values with the use of operational examples and historical Air Force leaders and will continue to develop their communication skills. Laboratory L100 must be taken and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.

AEST 2102. Evolution of US Air & Space Power II. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Air and Space Power (AEST 2101 in the fall and AEST 2102 in the spring): A survey course designed to examine general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Utilizing this perspective, the course covers a time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities (competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension: e.g. Principles of War and Tenets of Air and Space Power. As a whole, this course provides the student with a knowledge level understanding for the general element and employment of air and space power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. In addition, the students will continue to discuss the importance of the Air Force Core Values with the use of operational examples and historical Air Force leaders and will continue to develop their communication skills. Laboratory L100 must be taken and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.

AEST 3301. Leadership Studies I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

AEST 3301 is a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, leadership ethics and the communication skills required of a junior military officer. Case studies are used to examine leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. Course objective is for student to comprehend and apply the concepts of ethical behavior as well as comprehend the selected concepts, principles and theories of leadership and management. Laboratory L100 must be taken and consists of activities classified as leadership and management experiences. It involves the planning and controlling of military activities of the Cadet Corps; and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications.

AEST 3302. Leadership Studies II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

AEST 3302 builds upon the concepts established in AEST 3301. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. Course objective is for the student to comprehend and apply the concepts of conflict management, mentorship and counseling in a military environment, understand the principles of leadership authority and responsibility as it pertains to the military officer. Laboratory L100 must be taken and consists of activities classified as leadership and management experiences. It involves the planning and controlling of military activities of the Cadet Corps; and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications. Prerequisite: AEST 3301 or permission of the instructor.

AEST 4301. National Security Affairs I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Course is designed to examine the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military and current issues affecting military professionalism. Course objective is for student to comprehend basic elements of national security policy, Air Force functions and competencies and role of the military as it pertains to national security policy. Laboratory L100 must be taken and consists of activities classified as leadership and management experiences. It involves the planning and controlling of military activities of the Cadet Corps; and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications.

AEST 4302. National Security Affairs II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

AEST 4302 builds upon the concepts established in AEST 4301. Course is designed to examine the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on responsibility, authority and functions of an Air Force Commander, the military Major Commands Area of Responsibilities, basic introduction of military law and the Code of Conduct. Laboratory L100 must be taken and consists of activities classified as leadership and management experiences. It involves the planning and controlling of military activities of the Cadet Corps; and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral and written communications. Prerequisite: AEST 4301 or permission of the instructor.