Department of Social Work, Sociology, and Criminal Justice

The Department of Social Work, Sociology, and Criminal Justice offers programs of study leading to a Bachelor of Social Work degree, a Bachelor of Science degree in Sociology, and a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice, a Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences in Criminal Justice Administration and Master of Criminal Justice.

Social Work

The principal educational objective of the program leading to a Bachelor of Social Work degree is preparation of students for generalist social work practice. This program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and qualifies graduates for the licensing examination for Social Work under Texas law. No academic credit is awarded for life experiences in this degree program.

Requirements for admission, retention, and successful completion of the program are described in the Social Work Program Student Handbook and include a 2.5 overall GPA.

The Bachelor of Social Work Degree

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
SWK 207Social Welfare In America3
SWK 208Introduction To Social Work3
SWK 300Methods Skills of Social Work3
SWK 303Social Work with Diverse Population3
SWK 306Social Welfare Policy3
SWK 314Methods of Social Work Research3
SWK 316Practice I3
SWK 320Service Learning3
SWK 329Human Behavior and Social Environment I3
SWK 339Human Behavior and Social Environment II3
SWK 412Practice II3
SWK 422Field Placement I6
SWK 423Field Placement II6
BIOL 219Human Anatomy and Physiology4
BIOL 220Human Anatomy and Physiology 24
SOC 201Introduction To Sociology 23
PSY 101General Psychology3
SPAN 103Basic Spanish For Vocations3
SPAN 104Intermediate Spanish Vocations3
Sophomore Literature 23
Advanced SWK Electives9
Electives from SOC, SWK, C J6
Electives9
Total Hours134
1

Please see Academic Information section.

2

Course may be counted toward general education requirement.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Sociology

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
SOC 101Cultural Anthropology3
SOC 201Introduction To Sociology3
SOC 330Social Sciences Statistics3
SOC 402Methods Of Social Research3
SOC 403Sociological Theory3
SOC 499Sociology Internship/Capstone3
Advanced SOC Electives18
ECO 201Principles Of Economics: Macroeconomics 23
or ECO 101 Introduction To Economics
PHIL 201Introduction to Logic 23
or PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy
HIST 102World History Since 1700 23
or HIST 101 World History To 1700
Electives from C J, SOC, or SWK (3 Hours Advanced)6
Electives (3 Hours Advanced)9
Select one of the following3
Computer Tecnologyh and Impact
Topics in PC Software and Applications
Technical Writing with Computer Applications
Writing for Electronic Mediums
Minor (6 Hours Advanced)18
Total Hours123
1

Please see Academic Information section.

2

Course may be counted toward general education requirement.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
C J 131Introduction to Criminal Justice3
C J 232Criminal Procedure3
C J 234Police Systems and Practices3
or C J 238 Correctional Systems and Practices
C J 235Criminal Investigation3
C J 237Fundamentals of Criminal Law3
C J 305Criminology3
C J 310Criminal Justice Supervison and Management3
C J 315Criminal Evidence3
C J 340Homeland Security3
C J 412Criminal Justice Ethics3
C J 416Methods of Criminal Justice Research3
C J 498Senior Seminar3
Advanced C J Electives6
SPAN 101Beginning Spanish4
or SPAN 103 Basic Spanish For Vocations
ENGL 309Technical Writing and Document Design3
SOC 303Race and Ethnic Relations3
Select one of the following:3
Criminal Justice Statistics
Elementary Statistics for the Behavor Sciences
Social Sciences Statistics
Electives (9 Hours Advanced)24
Total Hours121
1

Please see Academic Information section.

The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences Degree in Criminal Justice Administration

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
Occupational Specialization: Approved Technical Training Approved, Work Experience33
ENGL 309Technical Writing and Document Design3
SOC 303Race and Ethnic Relations3
C J 310Criminal Justice Supervison and Management3
C J 315Criminal Evidence3
C J 340Homeland Security3
C J 412Criminal Justice Ethics3
C J 416Methods of Criminal Justice Research3
C J 485Seminar: Special Topics in Crimal Justice3
C J 486Problems in Criminal Justice6
C J Electives (6 Hours Advanced)15
Total Hours120
1

Please see Academic Information section.

Criminal Justice Courses

C J 131. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

A survey of the history, philosophy, and operations of the American criminal justice system. Topics include the nature of crime and justice, the history and development of the modern criminal justice system and the role of police, judiciary, and corrections in society.

C J 232. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the role of the judiciary in the criminal justice system. Topics include right to counsel, pre-trial release, grand juries, adjudication process, and sentencing. Prerequisites: CJ 131 or approval of department head.

C J 234. Police Systems and Practices. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the police profession. Topics include organization of law enforcement agencies, the police role in society, police operations, discretion, corruption, and current and emerging issues. Prerequisite: CJ 131 or.

C J 235. Criminal Investigation. 3 Hours.

Investigative theory, collection and preservation of evidence, sources of information, interview and interrogation, uses of forensic sciences, and case and trial preparation. Prerequisites: C J 131 and 133, or approval of department head.

C J 237. Fundamentals of Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

A study of the nature of criminal law, philosophical and historical development, major definitions and concepts, classification of crime, elements of crimes and penalties using Texas statutes as illustrations, and criminal responsibility. Prerequisites: C J 131 and 133, or approval of department head.

C J 238. Correctional Systems and Practices. 3 Hours.

An introduction to corrections as a profession. Topics include organization of correctional agencies, the role of corrections in society, correctional philosophies and agency operations, and current and emerging issues. Prerequisite: CJ 131 or approval of instructor.

C J 300. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Hours.

A study of the nature, extent, causation, treatment, and prevention of juvenile delinquency. A survey of the procedures and operations of the juvenile justice agencies will also be considered.

C J 301. Survey of Forensic Science. 3 Hours.

Introduces the scientific methods that currently play a major role in solving crimes. It provides background information on various forensic disciplines together with the basic techniques utilized by forensic scientists in analyzing common types of physical evidence. Course Fee: $15.00.

C J 305. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Study and critical appraisal of various theories of crime causation, including an examination of classical, biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives on the etiology of crime. Prerequisites: C J 131 or approval of instructor.

C J 308. Comparative Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

A study of criminal justice systems around the world. The organization, administration, and philosophy of various criminal systems will be examined, along with the cultural and historical environment in which they developed and exist. Prerequisite: 18 hours C J or approval of department head.

C J 310. Criminal Justice Supervison and Management. 3 Hours.

A study of theories and principles of supervision as applied to criminal justice agencies. Topics include organization, leadership, motivation, human resources flow, and managerial ethics. Prerequisite: Junior classification or approval of instructor.

C J 311. Techniques of Interviewing. 3 Hours.

A study of interview and interrogation techniques. Topics include preparation, environmental and psychological factors, legal issues, and ethics.

C J 313. Professional Writing in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours. [WI]

The process of developing and documenting information related to criminal justice field work and graduate studies in criminology and criminal justice, including researching, editing, revising, and creating technical reports, case narratives,.

C J 315. Criminal Evidence. 3 Hours.

An analysis of the procedures and rules of evidence applied to the acquisition, offering, admissibility, and presentation of evidence from the crime scene, courtroom, and appellate court perspectives. Prerequisites: CJ 131 and CJ 232 or approval of instructor.

C J 330. Community Corrections. 3 Hours.

A study of the philosophy, administrative procedures, and operational techniques used in the community based treatment and supervision of offenders. Prerequisites: SOC 201, CJ 131, or approval of instructor.

C J 331. Criminal Justice Statistics. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the elementary forms of statistical analysis, including measures of central tendency, variation, the normal curve and Z scores, measures of difference, regression analysis, and correlations. Emphasis will be placed on application of statistical analysis to criminal justice research and planning using the SPSS data analysis program.

C J 340. Homeland Security. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of strategic, legal, policy, operational, and organizational issues associated with the defense of the U.S. homeland from foreign and domestic terrorist threats. Topics include psychology of mass movements, terrorists¿ ideology, religion and terror, legal issues in homeland security, weapons of mass destruction, effective interfacing between local, state, and federal agencies, emergency management operations and dealing with mass casualties.

C J 400. Professional Ethics. 3 Hours.

C J 412. Criminal Justice Ethics. 3 Hours.

This course presents an analysis of contemporary ethical issues in crime and justice. Classical and contemporary ethical theories will be applied to the discussion of such issues as discretion, corruption, use of force, racism, deception, professionalism, and the nature and meaning of justice. Prerequisite: junior classification or approval of instructor.

C J 413. Social Development and Change. 3 Hours.

C J 416. Methods of Criminal Justice Research. 3 Hours. [WI]

This course is an introduction to the methods of criminological and criminal justice research, with emphasis on research ethics, research design, and methods of data.

C J 424. Penology. 3 Hours.

A study of the structure and function of correctional systems and how various philosophies of correctional treatment affect the operation of confinement institutions. Prerequisite: C J 310 or approval of the department head. Course fee $25.

C J 425. Advanced Investigation. 3 Hours.

Advanced criminal and civil investigation topics will be covered. An examination of frequently used, yet special investigative techniques will also be introduced. Emphasis will be placed on crime scene processing, crime scene analysis, forensic evaluations, investigative techniques, and investigative surveys. Prerequisite: C J 235.

C J 431. Criminal Justice Field Experience. 3 Hours.

Application and integration of academic content and development of skills within a criminal justice setting. Entry into this course will be arranged with the internship coordinator. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: At least 18 hours of C J or approval of the department head. Course graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Field experience fee $50.

C J 485. Seminar: Special Topics in Crimal Justice. 3 Hours.

Topics will vary according to timeliness and special needs. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisites: C J 131 and 133 or approval of the department head.

C J 486. Problems in Criminal Justice. 1-6 Hours.

Independent reading, research and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with the department head.

C J 498. Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

This is a capstone course that will assist the student in completing their knowledge of the criminal justice system through a study of current practice related to operations, recruitment, testing, training, law, and other issues to prepare the student for entry into the criminal justice profession. Prerequisite: Senior Year. Restricted to Criminal Justice majors.

Social Work Courses

SWK 207. Social Welfare In America. 3 Hours.

Provides a general introduction to human services in the United States. Emphasis is on services and programs directed at the most vulnerable populations in our society. Race, ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status are considered in an effort to understand the need for various human services and social welfare programs.

SWK 208. Introduction To Social Work. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the profession of social work: historical development, values and ethics, and various aspects of practice with an emphasis on the generalist perspective and populations at risk.

SWK 300. Methods Skills of Social Work. 3 Hours.

This pre-practice course will introduce students to the Generalist Social Work Practice Model. Beginning social work skills introduced include the principles of conducting a helping interview, including initial client contact, attending and listening, empathetic responses, exploration and elaboration, questioning, gaining cooperation, self-disclosure, and termination. Issues of problem solving with diverse populations and persons from different cultural backgrounds as well as.

SWK 302. Rural Issues. 3 Hours.

SWK 303. Social Work with Diverse Population. 3 Hours.

theoretical, political, cultural,and economic issues related to diverse populations. An emphasis will be placed on social work practice with oppressed populations. Societal forces which promote discriminatory and oppressive values, beliefs, and attitudes will be examined.

SWK 306. Social Welfare Policy. 3 Hours. [WI]

A study of social welfare as society's response to the needs of individuals, groups, and communities; a historical review of policy development reflecting society¿s changing values; policy analysis to determine impact on various systems including populations at risk; role of social policy in promoting social justice and social change. Prerequisite: SWK 207 or concurrent enrollment.

SWK 310. Social Work With An Aging Population. 3 Hours.

This course will use a competency-based approach to preparing students to engage in social work practice with aging populations. The focus will be on the four domains of geriatric competencies adopted by the Hartford Geriatric Social Work Initiative. The four domains are: 1) values, ethics, and theoretical perspectives; 2) assessment; 3) intervention; 4) aging services, programs, and policies. Prerequisite: Junior classification or approval of Director of Social Work Program.

SWK 311. Social Issues. 3 Hours.

Utilizes major theoretical perspectives from sociology to explore causes and consequences of contemporary social issues in American society such as alienation, family stresses, poverty, unemployment and technological change.

SWK 314. Methods of Social Work Research. 3 Hours. [WI]

Principles of the scientific method for building knowledge of and evaluating practice. Topics include: ethical and cultural issues in research; research design and methodology; quantitative and qualitative research strategies; evaluation of practice; critical evaluation of published research; and completion and reporting of research projects.

SWK 316. Practice I. 3 Hours.

Focus is on theories and methodologies needed for generalist social work practice with individuals and small groups. Critical evaluation of the value base of the social work profession and basic practice concepts for understanding a variety of intevention models in diverse settings will be explored. Prerequisite: Admission to the Social Work Program and completion of SWK 300. Course Fee $20.00.

SWK 320. Service Learning. 1-3 Hours.

Each student will identify and respond to a community/neighborhood challenge through volunteer, service learning work with a non-profit community agency and/or under direct supervision of the instructor. Volunteer work may be accomplished in the student's home neighborhood or community. Students will engage in supervised individual hours of service activities and have the opportunity to reflect on the responses to those problems.

SWK 329. Human Behavior and Social Environment I. 3 Hours.

Using systems theory as an organizing perspective, this course provides an integrated look at the bio-psycho-social factors influencing human development. Cultural factors affecting human functioning, as well as implications for social work practice are explored. Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in SWK 300, PSY 101, SOC 201, and a course in human biology (BIOL 219 & 220.

SWK 339. Human Behavior and Social Environment II. 3 Hours.

This course is a continuation of Human Behavior and Social Environment I with emphasis on theories and knowledge about the range of social systems in which individuals live and the ways in which systems deter people from achieving well-being. Values and ethical issues related to bio-psycho-social theories are included. Prerequisite: SWK 329.

SWK 377. Alcohol And Drug Abuse. 3 Hours.

Focus on psychoactive substances of use and abuse including: alcohol, legal/illegal drugs, and their impact on individuals, families, and society. Models of addiction, society's attitudes, and services for persons and families are explored.

SWK 411. Child Welfare. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the practice of social work in a child welfare context. This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of social work practice settings in child welfare. Past and present child welfare policies and programs will be examined.

SWK 412. Practice II. 3 Hours.

Focus is on the theory and practice of social change at community, society, and global levels. Models of community organization--community development, social action, and social planning will be emphasized including methods of resource delivery and redistribution. Prerequisite: SWK 300, SWK 316. Course Fee: $20.

SWK 413. Human Rights. 3 Hours.

Using the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights as a basis, this course examines human rights and human rights violations using a global perspective.

SWK 414. Medical and Health Care Policy. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of current trends and issues related to professional health care practice, service delivery, and populations at risk. Provides an opportunity to explore the many ways in which issues related to health, illness, and disability policies including cultural factors impact clients, families, and society. Appropriate ways for health care professionals to understand and intervene in these areas will.

SWK 421. Death and Dying. 3 Hours.

The ramifications of death, including the experiences and rights of the dying and the significance to those who mourn. Using major sociology theories, focuses on the meaning to society of the reality and symbolism of death. Credit for both SWK 421 and SOC 421 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: SOC 201.

SWK 422. Field Placement I. 6 Hours.

A field experience that provides the student with the opportunity to integrate theory and develop skills in an agency-based, educationally directed, professionally supervised experience in a social work practice setting. A minimum of 225 hours required to be completed and participation in a three-hour-per week seminar. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the field program and completion of SWK 207, 316, and 339. Field experience fee $50.

SWK 423. Field Placement II. 6 Hours.

A continuation of SWK 4226 with emphasis on generalist social work practice and on the interrelationships among human behavior, social policy, research, and practice. A minimum of 225 hours required to be completed and participation in a three-hour-per week seminar. Prerequisites: Completion of SWK 422 with a grade of C or better. Field experience fee $50.

SWK 432. Child Welfare Practicum. 12 Hours.

A practicum limited to students in the Title IV-E Child Welfare Program. Provides students with an opportunity to integrate theory and develop practice skills in a child welfare setting. Requires a minimum of 450 hours be completed in a professionally supervised State of Texas Child Protective Services setting. Prerequisites: Acceptance to the Title IV-E Child Welfare Program, completion of all required social work courses. Practicum fee: $50.00.

SWK 452. Women's Issues. 3 Hours.

Examines the role of women from a global perspective. Focuses on specific issues that affect the everyday lives of women. Special attention is given to the differential and unequal treatment of women based on age, race, social class, and cultural differences.

SWK 459. International Social Work. 3-6 Hours.

Provides students with an understanding of social work practice and social welfare policies from an international perspective. The implications of globalization and its impact on social welfare policies and social work practice will be examined. Trategies for inter-cultural social work practice and methods of combating discrimination also will be examined. Students may have the opportunity to travel outside the U.S. in order to become familiar with social welfare policies and.

SWK 485. Social Work Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

Intensive studies of current trends and issues related to professional social work practice, social service delivery, and populations at risk. May repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Junior classification or approval of the Social Work Program Director.

SWK 486. Problems in Social Work. 1-6 Hours.

Independent reading and research on various social work-related topics. Entry into the course will be arranged by Social Work Program Director.

Sociology Courses

SOC 101. Cultural Anthropology. 3 Hours.

A comparative study of culture, cultural patterns, and sociocultural change with the emphasis on preliterate societies.

SOC 201. Introduction To Sociology. 3 Hours.

A general introduction to the concepts and elementary methods used in the study of society. Special attention is given to social organization, social stratification, social institutions, formal organizations, small groups, and social change.

SOC 202. Social Problems. 3 Hours.

A study of several major problems facing contemporary society in such areas as family, mental health, crime and juvenile delinquency, racial and ethnic relationships. Prerequisite: SOC 201.

SOC 301. Sociology Of The Family. 3 Hours.

A comparative study of the family as a social institution with emphasis on formation, functions, maintenance, child rearing, and family disorganization. Prerequisites: Junior classification and SOC 201 or approval of the department head.

SOC 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. 3 Hours.

Includes an analysis of relations between dominant groups and minority groups that make up American society. Theories of race relations and prejudice, the meaning of racial differences, group conflict, and modes of accommodation are emphasized.

SOC 304. Medical Sociology. 3 Hours.

This course explores how the sociology of health and illness are affected by social structure and cultural factors, including how these influence health and illness and people¿s perceptions of the same. Additionally, this course explores the concrete organizations that make up medical systems and how that system reflects the interests of doctors, insurance companies, pharmaceutical industries, hospitals, researchers, the government, and the consumer. Prerequisites: SOC 201 or 202 or approval of department head.

SOC 305. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Theories of criminology and significant research on causes, extent, cost and ecology of crime; police, criminal, and juvenile courts; and prisons and reformatories. Course also focuses on prevention and rehabilitation. Credit for both C J 305 and SOC 305 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: SOC 201 or approval of instructor.

SOC 306. Social Welfare Policy. 3 Hours.

SOC 307. Rural Sociology. 3 Hours.

Adaptations of families to rural environments, farming, and other occupations; organizations, agencies, and institutions serving rural people; problems in delivering services to the country; and rural development and change. Prerequisites: Junior classification and SOC 201 or instructor approval.

SOC 308. Deviant Behavior. 3 Hours.

An examination of the factors and conditions leading to behaviors that violate and deviate from fundamental social values. The relationship of personal and social maladjustment is addressed in relation to the various theories of deviant behavior. Prerequisite: SOC 201.

SOC 310. Sociology Of Aging. 3 Hours.

The study of the reciprocal relationship between society and those considered aged by society, utilizing concepts and theoretical frameworks applicable to that population group. The course also examines the social forces that impinge on the aging process, including socially constructed images of the aged, and patterns of inequality of gender, race, and economics. Credit for both SWK 310 and SOC 310 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: SOC 201.

SOC 312. Environmental Sociology. 3 Hours.

Examines relationships and interactions between society and the environment. Also examines how the natural world and its degradation influence the way societies are organized by studying human communities as part of natural ecosystems. Prerequisite: SOC 201.

SOC 315. Sociology of Sport and Leisure. 3 Hours.

This course examines the mechanisms through which sport and leisure institutions and practices are created, maintained, and transformed. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between sport and leisure institutions and other social systems such as the family, religion, politics, and economics. Topics considered include violence, discrimination, power, globalization, and the role of the media. This course places a strong emphasis on exploring the ways in gender, race, and class intersect with sport and leisure institutions.

SOC 320. Stratification and Inequality. 3 Hours.

The study of social inequality in human society, with emphasis on the social class structure of the United States, its origins, development, and consequences for the society and the individual. Prerequisite: SOC 201 or approval of instructor.

SOC 330. Social Sciences Statistics. 3 Hours.

Surveys the application of elementary forms of statistical processes, including central tendency, variation, the normal curve and Z scores, analysis of variance, regression analysis, and correlations, to social science data. The application of statistics will be made to the following areas: social work, sociology, criminal justice, political science, and gerontology. SPSS will be utilized for data analysis.

SOC 402. Methods Of Social Research. 3 Hours. [WI]

Principles and methods of social research, including research design, methods of observation, questionnaires, interviews, and other sources of social data; qualitative and quantitative techniques of inference; analysis and research report writing. Limited research studies and projects will be undertaken by the students. Prerequisites: Junior classification, SOC 201 and 202, or approval of department head.

SOC 403. Sociological Theory. 3 Hours. [WI]

This course examines the major schools of sociological thought, including perspectives from both classic and contemporary sociological theory. Prerequisites: Junior classification, SOC 201 or approval of department head.

SOC 404. Sociology Of Religion. 3 Hours.

An examination of the basic principles of religion, religious belief, and practice as a sociological concept. Attention will be given to the relationship of religion to the progress and stability of the social order. Prerequisite: SOC 201 or approval of department head.

SOC 405. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

The scientific study of the influence of society, groups, culture, and other persons on the attitudes, behavior, and experiences of the individual. An examination of the total person as he or she functions in relation to the social environment. Prerequisites: Junior classification, SOC 201 and 202, or approval of department head.

SOC 412. Gender In Society. 3 Hours.

Socialization to sex roles; male/female differences in family, work, and political behavior; male/female inequality; effects of gender in education and religion; and current changes in sex role definitions. Prerequisite: SOC 201 and junior standing.

SOC 413. Social Development and Change. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on social processes and social problems as they are contained in the highly interdependent world system. Social change and development stresses historical, comparative, and critical perspectives, and addresses the problem of how and why societies and cultures around the world change and whether those changes promote justice, equity, democracy, and development of human potential. Prerequisites: Junior standing and SOC 201.

SOC 414. Medical and Health Care Policy. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of current trends and issues related to professional health care practice, service delivery, and populations at risk. Provides an opportunity to explore the many ways in which issues related to health, illness, and disability policies including cultural factors impact clients, families, and society. Appropriate ways for health care professionals to understand and intervene in these areas will be discussed. Credit for both SOC 414 and SWK 414 will not be awarded.

SOC 421. Death and Dying. 3 Hours.

The ramifications of death, including the experiences and rights of the dying and the significance to those who mourn. Using major sociology theories, focuses on the meaning to society of the reality and symbolism of death. Credit for both SWK 421 and SOC 421 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: SOC 201.

SOC 422. Age and Ethnic Stratification. 3 Hours.

Studies aging as a process and life stage as affected by health, economic status, and stratification in this society and in other industrialized countries. Addresses culture, ethnicity, and race as key dimensions in understanding aging and health as delivered to diverse populations. Prerequisite: SOC 310.

SOC 485. Sociology Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

Independent reading, research, discussion, and paper writing under personal direction of instructor. Prerequisite: Senior classification or approval of department head. May be taken more than once for credit if topics vary.

SOC 486. Problems in Sociology. 1-6 Hours.

Independent reading, research and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with the sociology counselor.

SOC 499. Sociology Internship/Capstone. 3 Hours.

Serving as a required, capstone course, students assist the faculty supervisor with their placements in a social science related agency. The field experience, coupled with textbook materials and weekly class seminars, provides students the opportunity to integrate sociological theory with practical experience. At the agency, students will work 120 hours, acquiring professional skills while earning college credit. Students will also keep a journal of internship experiences and write a final paper that applies sociology to the field experience. Prerequisites: major in sociology, senior standing, and approval of the undergraduate advisor. Field experience fee $50.

Dr. James J. Vardalis, Head
Humanities Building, Room 375
Box T-0665
(254) 968-9024
www.tarleton.edu/swksoccj

Professors: L. Anderson, L. Stanley-Stevens

Associate professors: G. Eichenberg, K. Styron, J. Vardalis

Assistant professors: K. Bowen, R.Getty, C. Key, A. Lanning, J. LaTouche, F. Pratt, E. Randle

Instructor: S. Hankhouse