Engineering Technology

The mission of the department of Engineering Technology is to provide applied engineering programs via an academically challenging program of study that prepares graduates to establish successful careers and assume leadership roles in engineering, manufacturing, construction, and education. Applied engineering is a part of the engineering field which requires the application of scientific and engineering knowledge and methods combined with technical skills in support of engineering activities.The Department offers programs of study leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Manufacturing Engineering Technology, Mechanical Engineering Technology, Industrial Technology and Construction Science and Management. For the adult student seeking to advance career opportunities the department offers a Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences degree in Manufacturing and Industrial Management, and a Master of Science degree in Engineering and Quality Management online to allow our students to maintain professional and personal commitments while continuing an education.

Bachelor of Science in Construction Science and Management

The mission of the Bachelor of Science in Construction Science and Management is to provide graduates with knowledge and skills that are valued by commercial, residential, industrial and heavy civil sectors of the construction industry. Construction science and management graduates will gain knowledge of construction materials and methods, structural systems, soils, site development, surveying, contract administration, codes, plans and specifications, planning, estimating, scheduling, and evaluating project performance. Students graduating with this degree will find themselves with the skills and knowledge to compete in a regional, national and international job market.

The Bachelor of Science in Construction Science and Management

Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
CHEM 1411 [shared] College Chemistry I
PHYS 2425 [shared] Univeristy Physics I
or PHYS 1401 College Physics I
MATH 1316Plane Trigonometry3
MATH 2413Calculus I4
ENGT 2303 [shared] Engineering Economy
ENGT 1100 [shared] Transitioning to University Studies in Engineering Technology
Stat Requirement (Select One):3
Elementary Statistical Methods
Business Statistics
CNST 1305Construction Graphics3
CNST 1306Construction Materials and Methods3
CNST 3301Building Mechanical and Electrical Systems3
CNST 3308Structural Steel and Timber Construction3
CNST 3309Commercial Construction and Industrial Subsystems3
CNST 4310Site & Building Foundations3
CNST 1307Construction Methods-Concrete and Masonry3
CNST 3311Construction Materials Testing and Inspection3
CNST 4313Construction Law and Ethics3
ENGT 3318 [WI] Research and Reporting For Technologists3
CNST 3320Construction Safety Management3
CNST 3321Construction Management3
CNST 3322Building Information Modeling3
CNST 4323Construction Estimating3
CNST 4325Contract Administration3
CNST 3335Construction Layout and Site Development3
CNST 3385Project Management3
CNST 4395Construction Capstone2
Approved Electives15
Total Hours120

Bachelor of Science in Manufacturing Engineering Technology

The Bachelor of Science degree in Manufacturing Engineering Technology educates students in a wide range of manufacturing related areas: quality, ergonomics, production planning, management, control systems, productivity, automated systems, and computer modeling. The Manufacturing Engineering Technology courses are supplemented with a foundation of industrial technology courses and emphases in mathematics, statistics, and the sciences. A wide choice of electives compliments the degree, allowing the student maximum flexibility in the areas of business, science, mathematics, computer information systems, and pre-engineering.

Bachelor of Sciences in Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
ENGT 1305Principles of Drafting3
ENGT 1306Introduction to Mechanics3
ENGT 1317Machining Technology3
ENGT 2335Solid Modeling3
ENGT 3303 [WI] Industrial Materials3
ENGT 3318 [WI] Research and Reporting For Technologists3
ENGT 3324Thermoplastic Processing3
or ENGT 3325 Mechanical Analysis
ENGT 3350Numerical Control Systems3
ENGT 3395Fundamentals of Industrial Project Management3
ENGT 4395Engineering Technology Projects3
ENGT 2303 [shared] Engineering Economy
ENGT 2316Introduction to Manufacturing Systems3
ENGT 3326Ergonomics and Work Methods3
ENGT 3336Industrial Controls3
ENGT 3386Quality Management3
ENGT 4326Applications of Linear Programming and Optimization3
ENGT 4336Production Planning3
ENGT 4346Manufacturing Management3
ENGT 4376Automated Manufacturing Systems3
MATH 1316Plane Trigonometry (or above)3
MATH 2413Calculus I4
MATH 2414Calculus II4
BUSI 3311Business Statistics3
COSC 1310Procedural Programming3
or BCIS 1309 Introduction to Programming Logic and Design
CHEM 1411 [shared] General Chemistry I 2
PHYS 2425 [shared] Univeristy Physics I 2
Advanced Electives3
Electives4
Total Hours120
1

Please see Academic Information section.

2

Course may be counted toward general education requirement.

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology

The mission of the Mechanical Engineering Technology  Program is to provide high quality technical and academic preparation for future engineering technologists.  Our primary goal is to graduate engineering technologists who are technically equipped and highly motivated to successfully compete in the workplace.  The program is focused on the applications of computers to solve manufacturing problems.

The Mechanical Engineering Technology courses are highly applications oriented with laboratory requirements that integrate the computer across all areas of manufacturing.  The program includes a rigorous commitment to courses in Chemistry, Physics, Calculus I & II, and Statistics.  Students may choose from numerous computer, technical, math, pre-engineering, and business courses to round out their educational experience.

Engineering Technology as a field of study is inherently an interdisciplinary one.  Students who choose to challenge themselves with the rigors of the Mechanical Engineering Technology program will be rewarded with the analytical skills and knowledge to design complex systems and industrial machines to meet manufacturing needs.  With a strong background in materials, mechanical and machine design, thermal and fluid system analysis, and a focus on automation, graduates from this program will be uniquely qualified to address the design needs of Texas manufacturing and related businesses. Having a skill set in traditional mechanical engineering disciplines with background in quality, project management, and continuous improvement theories make our graduates very valuable to small and large manufacturing alike.

With the rigors associated with the Mechanical Engineering Technology degree come the rewards.  The qualified engineering technologist is highly sought by manufacturers and is highly rewarded monetarily.  Mechanical Engineering Technology graduates from Tarleton are in a favorable geographical location to take advantage of explosive growth in high technology jobs, being situated near the I 35 industrial corridor that runs from Austin to the Fort Worth/Dallas Metroplex.  Typical job placements include Engineering and Technology opportunities in Mechanical Design, Tooling, Manufacturing Engineering, and Project Management.  These entry level positions lead to further opportunities in Engineering Management.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology

Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
PHYS 2425 [shared] Univeristy Physics I
CHEM 1411 [shared] College Chemistry I
ENGT 1305Principles of Drafting3
ENGT 1306Introduction to Mechanics3
ENGT 1317Machining Technology3
ENGT 2335Solid Modeling3
ENGT 3301Applied Dynamics3
ENGT 3303Industrial Materials3
ENGT 3318Research and Reporting For Technologists3
ENGT 3324Thermoplastic Processing3
or ENGT 3325 Thermoset Plastic Processing
ENGT 3336Industrial Controls3
ENGT 3327Mechanical Analysis3
ENGT 3385Fluid Mechanics3
ENGT 4322Applied Thermodynamics3
ENGT 3313Advanced Materials3
ENGT 3305Machine Design3
ENGT 4356Advanced Industrial Controls3
ENGT 3395Fundamentals of Industrial Project Management3
ENGT 4395Engineering Technology Projects3
MATH 1316Plane Trigonometry3
MATH 2413Calculus I4
MATH 2414Calculus II4
ENGT 2303 [shared] Engineering Economy
BUSI 3311Business Statistics3
or MATH 1342 Elementary Statistical Methods
Advanced Elective or Minor Course9
General Elective4
Total Hours120

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology

The Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Technology provides a common core of courses and four emphasis areas from which to choose: General Industrial Technology, Industrial Design, Manufacturing Operations, and Technology Education. These emphasis areas provide students with the flexibility to tailor degree programs to  particular interests.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Industrial Technology

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
ENGT 1305Principles of Drafting3
ENGT 1317Machining Technology3
ENGT 2335Solid Modeling3
ENGT 3303 [WI] Industrial Materials3
ENGT 3317Machine Tool Technology3
ENGT 3324Thermoplastic Processing3
ENGT 3345Industrial Design3
ENGT 3350Numerical Control Systems3
MATH 1316Plane Trigonometry (or higher)3
Total Hours69
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
General Without Certification
ENGT 1306Introduction to Mechanics3
ENGT 2316Introduction to Manufacturing Systems3
ENGT 3318 [WI] Research and Reporting For Technologists3
ENGT 3320Industrial Safety3
ENGT 4395Engineering Technology Projects3
ENGT 3336Industrial Controls3
BUSI 3311Business Statistics3
Advanced ENGT Electives9
Electives from any field (6 Hours Advanced) 221
Total Hours51
Technology Education (Secondary Teacher Certification)
ENGT 1306Introduction to Mechanics3
ENGT 3314Principles of Technology Education3
ENGT 3325Mechanical Analysis3
ENGT 3393Modular Technology3
ENGT 4305Architectural Drafting3
ENGT 2316Introduction to Manufacturing Systems3
ENGT 3336Industrial Controls3
AGRI 2304Agricultural Construction II3
BCIS 1305Business Computer Applications3
COMM 1316News Photography I3
ENGL 3309 [WI] Technical writing and Document Design3
EDUC 3320Professional Development I: Understanding Learners3
EDUC 3330Professional Development II: Effective Instruction3
EDUC 4330Professional Development III: Application of Effective Teaching Practices3
EDUC 4335Professional Development IV: Issues in Professional Development3
EDUC 4690Practicum in teaching6
Select one of the following:3
Child Psychology
Educational Psychology
Child Development
READ 3351Content Area Reading3
Total Hours57
1

Please see Academic Information section.

2

Some students may choose to use 18 hours of electives for a minor in any field other than ENGT.

Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences in Manufacturing and Industrial Management

The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (BAAS) degree is designed for students who have training in a technical area. Education received at technical schools, community colleges, military technical schools, and employer-sponsored training schools may be applied toward the degree. With appropriate documentation, the technical training may be supplemented with a maximum of 15-21 semester credit hours for work experience. The degree allows students to choose between two emphasis areas.

The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences Degree in Manufacturing and Industrial Management

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
ENGT 3318 [WI] Research and Reporting For Technologists3
ENGT 3303 [WI] Industrial Materials3
ENGT 3395 [WI] Fundamentals of Industrial Project Management3
MATH 1316Plane Trigonometry3
Advanced Electives12
Advanced ENGT 6
Technology Courses and/or Military or Employer Sponsored Training (12-36 hours); Work Experience (0-21 hours)33-36
Total Hours105-108
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Industrial Management
ENGT 3386Quality Management3
ENGT 4336Production Planning3
ENGT 4346Manufacturing Management3
ENGT 4376Automated Manufacturing Systems3
Total Hours12
Safety Management
ENGT 3326Ergonomics and Work Methods3
ENGT 3320Industrial Safety3
ENGT 3330Consumer and Retail Safety3
ENGT 4320Occupational Safety and Health3
Total Hours12
General
Advanced ENGT 12
Total Hours12
1

Please see Academic Information section.

Construction Courses

CNST 1305. Construction Graphics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Computer based 2D & 3D graphics used in the construction industry including CAD/REVIT based drawing development, construction drawing interpretation, site/plan/elevation/section/detail drawings, structural and MEP drawings. Residential and commercial construction based. Lab fee: $10.

CNST 1306. Construction Materials and Methods. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course introduces students to the basic building materials and systems used in constructing buildings, bridges, and infrastructure projects. It offers the basic Understanding of the use of common systems such as foundations, structural framing/skeleton, building envelops, and finishes. Namely, it introduces students to proper terminology and usage of wood, steel, and concrete materials and selected manufactured components. Lab fee: $10.

CNST 1307. Construction Methods-Concrete and Masonry. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course is an investigation into concrete and masonry construction methods, testing, and design used an residential and commercial construction is made. Topics include: concrete slab, wall, footing, and pier construction; brick and concrete masonry unit (CMU) wall construction; and decorative concrete /masonry design techniques. Lab fee: $30.

CNST 3301. Building Mechanical and Electrical Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course introduces students to the planning and construction of mechanical and electrical systems common to construction projects. It involves basic calculations of cooling/heating loads, determination of temporary power demands, and sizing of pipes, HVAC equipment, and ducts. Lab fee: $30.

CNST 3308. Structural Steel and Timber Construction. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course introduces students to the design aspects of temporary structures using steel and timber standard shapes/components. This involves the application of the AISC (American Institute of Steel Construction) Code and also the design of wood framework systems. Lab fee: $30.

CNST 3309. Commercial Construction and Industrial Subsystems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course introduces students to the terminology and functions of details of mechanical and electrical systems common to process and industrial plant projects. It involves basic calculations of systems, determination of power requirements, and selection of systems. Lab fee: $10.

CNST 3311. Construction Materials Testing and Inspection. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Construction materials testing and inspection procedures in laboratory and field situations using standard testing equipment, methods and field inspection techniques per ASTM and ACI standards. Laboratory reports, computer analysis, data collection and simulated field inspections. Prerequisites: CNST 1305. Lab fee: $30.

CNST 3320. Construction Safety Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course introduces students to OSHA regulations and industry practices related to creating and maintaining safe construction sites. Students will be eligible to sit for the 10-hour OSHA safety certification exam. Prerequisites: CNST 1306.

CNST 3321. Construction Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Construction Management courses including construction operations and key project management skills. Critical path scheduling, duration, logic, resource leveling, and the calculation of costs. Typical contract formats: project planning with emphasis on legal aspects of various types of corporations and structure.

CNST 3322. Building Information Modeling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course is designed specifically to both introduce specific BIM (Building Information Modeling) techniques and software as well as further develop VDC (Virtual Design and Construction) software as they align with current managerial methods and project delivery platforms. The course is also designed and developed to promote discussion with respect to the roles played by owners, designers, builders, and suppliers. Specific attention is paid to BIM’s role in various project platform delivery systems including DESIGN-BID-BILD, DESIGN BUILD, CM AT RISK, and IPD. Prerequisites: CNST 1305, 1306, and 1307. Lab fee: $10.

CNST 3335. Construction Layout and Site Development. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Basic surveying techniques for construction layouts, fundamentals and regulations related to land development. Lab fee: $30.

CNST 3385. Project Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course explores major problems, tasks and techniques required to manage the technical program in each phase of the product life cycle. Organizational planning, decision-making, and internal external interface techniques for each phase of the project life cycle are addressed. Additional concepts such as: Earned Value Analysis (EVA), Critical Path Management (CPM), Project Requirements Analysis, and Schedule Task Analysis will be explored in depth.

CNST 4084. Seminar. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Topics will vary according to timeliness and special needs. May be taken more than once for credit.

CNST 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to meet the needs of Engineering Technology students who have above average academic ability and who need to pursue subject matter that is not normally included in the Engineering Technology curriculum. Approval for enrollment in this course shall be with the concurrence of the individual instructor and the department head. The student must be currently enrolled in one of the majors offered in the Engineering Technology Department.

CNST 4310. Site & Building Foundations. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

The course gives an overview of the difference and correlation between soil mechanics and foundations engineering. Soil mechanics is the branch of engineering that involves the study of the properties of soils and their behaviors under stress and strain in idealized conditions. Foundation engineering is the application of the principles of soil mechanics in the planning, design and construction of foundations for buildings, highways, dams and so forth. This course presents a detailed look into soil properties and foundations design. Prerequisites: CNST 3311. Lab fee: $30.

CNST 4313. Construction Law and Ethics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course introduces students to basic understanding of contractual issues that are significant to construction managers. The course is designed to teach basic concepts of contract law and to recognize legal issues making decisions based on current industrial standards. The course also focuses on addressing ethics in the construction industry.

CNST 4323. Construction Estimating. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course introduces students to the skills and tools necessary to prepare formal bids for construction projects. It focuses on pricing, indirect costs, bid analysis and use of computer aided software. The goal of this course is to expand your skills in new topics of estimating and to assist you in developing high confidence in the application of the estimating skills you learned previously. The course addresses the bidding procedure from receipt of bid documents through work breakdown, work quantification, pricing and bid submittal for lump sum and unit price bids, and preparation of design/build proposals. Prerequisites: ENGT 3303.

CNST 4325. Contract Administration. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course introduces students to issues regarding administering construction contracts. It focuses on understanding of the purpose of contract documents, legal hierarchy of the documents, the interrelationships among the documents, liabilities accepted with each document, and typical challenges related to communications among the parties involved, establishing chain of commands, warranties, and progress/final payments. Prerequisites: CNST 3320 and CNST 4313.

CNST 4395. Construction Capstone. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Capstone projects course emphasizing a team approach to the analysis and solutions of Construction problems. Projects will be supplied by industry whenever possible. Emphasizes scheduling, design, working in teams. A final written report drawings and presentations will be provided to the customer.

Engineering Technology Courses

ENGT 1100. Transitioning to University Studies in Engineering Technology. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, aid in the development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, and encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective. These skill sets are presented in the context of Engineering Technology.

ENGT 1101. Introduction to Engineering Technology. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will introduce engineering technology and engineering students to resources and skills that will help them to be successful in their academics and careers. This course will help students explore the various disciplines and professional societies available. The class will also focus on helping students develop the skills needed to be successful in a rigorous engineering or technology major including study skills, mentoring, and academic support.

ENGT 1305. Principles of Drafting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

An introduction to mechanical drafting involving geometrical constructions, orthographic projection, dimensioning techniques, sectional views, auxiliary views, isometric views, and other topics related to manufacturing and other areas of drafting. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 1306. Introduction to Mechanics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Study of forces as vectors quantities; resultant of force systems; principals of mechanical equilibrium; application of principles to problems, devices and structures commonly encountered in industry. Prerequisite: Concurrent with MATH 1316 or equivalent.

ENGT 1317. Machining Technology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of metals and their machining characteristics and application. Emphasis is placed on layout, precision measurement, and heat treating. Laboratory experiences include work with sheet metal, metal casting, and metal lathe operation. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 2303. Engineering Economy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles of economics equivalence; time value of money, analysis of single and multiple investments; comparison of alternatives; capital recovery and tax implications; certainty; uncertainty; risk analysis; public sector analysis; and break-even concepts. Prerequisite: MATH 1316, MATH 2412, or MATH 2413.

ENGT 2309. Electrical Circuits. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 5 Hours).

Principles of electricity, magnetism, and basic laws. Fundamentals of analog and digital electronic components and circuits, including applied areas. Laboratory involves experiments with basic circuits and test equipment. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 2310. Introduction to Manufacturing Processes. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of metals and their machining characteristics and application. Emphasis is placed on layout, precision measurement, and heat treating. Laboratory experiences include work with sheet metal, metal casting, and metal lathe operation. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 2316. Introduction to Manufacturing Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of organizational and production techniques used in manufacturing. A thematic team approach will be used to design and produce a product using principles of mass production. Concepts of manufacturing that will be studied will include: principles of tooling, quality, plant layout, resource planning and scheduling. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 2335. Solid Modeling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of complex three-dimensional solid models used in the fields of mechanical engineering, sheet metal, welding, and other areas of manufacturing and engineering. Orthographic views projected from solid models and annotation techniques are used to produce engineering drawings. Prerequisite: ENGT 1305 or 3 semester hours of drafting or approval of the instructor. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3099. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 3-9 Hours).

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to integrate academic study with work experience that is germane to their major or minor. Enrollment requires a two-semester minimum commitment that may be accomplished by 1) alternating semesters of full-time study with semesters of curriculum-related employment, or 2) enrolling in courses at least half-time (6 semester hours) and working part-time in parallel positions of curriculum-related employment. The department Cooperative Education advisor will supervise the student's experience and assign the final grade based on the student's final report which is required to complete the course. Students may participate in the Cooperative Education program for an unlimited number of semesters but a maximum of 6 hours credit may be counted toward a degree. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 semester hours which includes 12 hours in the major or minor discipline in which the Cooperative Education course is desired, minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the appropriate major or minor field, and department head approval. Field experiences fee $50.

ENGT 3301. Applied Dynamics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will focus on understanding the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. It will cover general particle and two-dimensional rigid body motion and will include the concepts of impulse and momentum and the principle of work and energy. Prerequisites: MATH 2413 and ENGT 1306.

ENGT 3303. Industrial Materials. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours). [WI]

A study of the structure, properties, processing, and application of metallic, polymeric, ceramic, and composite materials utilized in manufacturing. Laboratory exercises include processing methods, physical and mechanical testing, modification of properties, manufacturing applications, and material identification. Lab fee $2.

ENGT 3305. Machine Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Fundamental concepts in the design of separate elements which compose the machine; application of properties and mechanics of materials modified by practical considerations. Emphasis will be placed on identifying design weakness and using analysis tools to refine the existing designs. Extensive use of common finite elements analysis tools will be utilized. Prerequisite: MATH 2413, PHYS 2425.

ENGT 3309. Control Systems for Mechanical Application. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Application of computers to control industrial processes. Study of continuous- and discrete-time control algorithms; digital signal processing; and system control concepts applied to process control. Prerequisite: ENGT 2303. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 3313. Advanced Materials. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A study of metallic, polymeric, and ceramic materials, emphasizing dependence of mechanical and electrical properties on solidstate bonding forces and microstructure. Introductory design considerations. Prerequisites: Concurrent with MATH 2413.

ENGT 3314. Principles of Technology Education. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the Texas Technology Education curriculum, to include the areas of communication, manufacturing, construction, energy, power, transportation, computer applications, bio-related technology, electricity, electronics, graphics, principles of technology, and other related technologies.

ENGT 3317. Machine Tool Technology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Fundamentals and principles of metal removal processes. Emphasis is placed on metal lathes, milling machines, grinding machines, and electric discharge machines. Prerequisite: ENGT 2310. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3318. Research and Reporting For Technologists. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A study of research tools, methods, and data collection techniques used in the field of Engineering Technology. Emphasis will be placed on gathering, analyzing, and presenting technical information related to manufacturing topics in both oral and written form. Technical reports, product documentation, and correspondence will also be discussed. Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 and junior status or approval of the department head.

ENGT 3319. Motor Control and Machine Automation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of power transformers, single and multiphase circuits. The study of DC machines, AC single and multiphase synchronous and induction machines, and an introduction to power electronics. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 3320. Industrial Safety. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of principles and practices used to establish a safe and healthful environment for industrial personnel. Includes a study of general industrial safety, safety and health regulation agencies, hazard recognition and correction, and first aid. Credit for both ENGT 3320 and MGMT 3320 will not be awarded.

ENGT 3324. Thermoplastic Processing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of thermoplastic materials and processes used in plastics manufacturing. Emphasis will be placed on injection molding, thermoforming, extrusion, rotational casting, expansion processes, hot melt casting, and coatings. Also the impact of material selection on processing parameters will be stressed. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3325. Thermoset Plastic Processing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of the processes, equipment, and molds that are used to produce thermoset products. Emphasis will be placed on pultrusion, compression molding, transfer molding, filament winding, and hand lay-up of glass reinforced composite materials. The properties of thermoset materials will also be studied. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3326. Ergonomics and Work Methods. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to the design of man-machine systems with particular emphasis on the application of ergonomics to the manufacturing workplace and environment. Use of anthropometric data in design; limitations of human performance; effects of environmental stress on work performance, safety, and health. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 and 3 hours of statistics or concurrent enrollment. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3327. Mechanical Analysis. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Mechanical Analysis & Design. Design of machine elements including bearings, springs, levers, shafts, gears, belts, and small mechanical devices; with an emphasis on theories of fatigue failure. Prerequisite: MECH 3305.

ENGT 3330. Consumer and Retail Safety. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides the student with the essential information as to how and why human accidents occur in retail settings and strategies they can have easily been prevented. Topics will include stocking and walkway issues, shipping and receiving hazards, parking and consumer loading issues as well as crowd control. Hazard identification and mitigation strategies will be emphasized.

ENGT 3336. Industrial Controls. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

The theory and application of electronic programmable devices such as programmable logic controllers, temperature controllers, counters, etc. Emphasis is also given to control devices using pneumatics and hydraulics. Ladder logic and input/output devices will be emphasized. Lab Fee: $10.00.

ENGT 3340. Ceramics and Jewelry. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of the history, media, and processes used in the design and creation of jewelry, ceramics, and pottery. Other three-dimensional media may also be studied. Emphasis is on the historical significance of three-dimensional artifacts as an expression of cultural advancement. Principles and techniques of investment casting, sculpting in wax, slip casting, and other methods of creating three-dimensional art will be emphasized. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3345. Industrial Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

An application based course that exposes students to industrial design and provides experience in the varied aspects of the design process, culminating in a final, individual design project. Topics include, but are not limited to: Working drawings, tolerancing, dimensioning, material selection and pricing, sketching and proper design techniques. Prerequisite Course(s): ENGT 2335 or approval of the instructor. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3350. Numerical Control Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Principles, techniques, and applications of numerically controlled machine tools. Application of the APT system. Laboratory experiences in processing, writing, debugging, and processing the N/C part program. Prerequisite: ENGT 2310 or approval of the instructor. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3360. Safety Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Occupational safety engineering and management with emphasis on control of hazardous materials, fire prevention, safety considerations in production facility design and maintenance, and operation of effective safety programs.

ENGT 3375. Continuous Improvement. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

The role of the manufacturing engineer in continuous improvement projects to improve design and production processes. The student will utilize modern tools and techniques for planning and managing continuous improvement projects, integrating and deploying change programs, data based decision making, and resource management. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 3385. Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Elementary fluid mechanics. Manual and computer assisted calculation of viscosity, flow, pressure and pressure-velocity relationships of fluid to design fluid power systems or control manufacturing processes. Emphasis on the selection of valves, accumulators, actuators, seals, pumps, and motors. Prerequisites: MATH 2413 and PHYS 2425 or equivalent.

ENGT 3386. Quality Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the application of various methods used by manufacturing to quantify product quality. This will include a review of the ASTM, ANSI, and ISO tests as they apply to metallic, polymeric, ceramic, and composite materials. Statistical Quality Control, Statistical Process Control, Total Quality Management, and ISO 9000 will also be investigated. Laboratory assignments will acquaint the student with the variety of instrumentation that is used in quality control and their use. Prerequisite: 3 hours of statistics or concurrent enrollment. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3393. Modular Technology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course will investigate various systems used in modular technology education. Modular technology studies will include broadcasting technology, applied physics, power energy, transportation, graphic communication, composites, and computer application. Prerequisite: junior standing. Lab fee $15.

ENGT 3395. Fundamentals of Industrial Project Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

As an introductory course for project management, the course covers essential elements to successfully initiate and complete a project in general. Topics will include five of the basic elements of project management; project initiation, planning, executing, controlling and closing a project. The course includes the use of Project Management software.

ENGT 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to meet the needs of Engineering Technology students who have above average academic ability and who need to pursue subject matter that is not normally included in the Engineering Technology curriculum. Approval for enrollment in this course shall be with the concurrence of the individual instructor and the department head. The student must be currently enrolled in one of the majors offered in the Engineering Technology Department. Prerequisite: completion of 30 or more hours in the Department of Engineering Technology.

ENGT 4305. Architectural Drafting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A course in residential architectural drafting using computer-aided drafting. Emphasis is placed on residential design and home planning. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 4320. Occupational Safety and Health. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of principles and practices used to establish a safety and health program within industrial and retail environments. The course includes a study of general safety regulations and occupational safety program strategies as they pertain to internal organizational efforts. Related topics such as safety and health regulation agencies, hazard recognition and correction, and first aid.

ENGT 4322. Applied Thermodynamics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Theory and application of energy methods in engineering; conservation principles to investigate traditional thermodynamics and internal flow fluids. Prerequisites: MATH 2414, ENGT 3325, PHYS 2425.

ENGT 4326. Applications of Linear Programming and Optimization. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

An introduction to applications of linear and nonlinear programming, single and multiple objective optimization, sensitivity, forecasting, queuing theory, and decision analysis. The student will be able to implement these concepts using a COTS software application as applied in industrial and public settings. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 4336. Production Planning. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the principles and theory used in the design and maintenance of production operations and inventory systems. These include forecasting techniques, inventory models, production control models and assembly line balancing. Particular emphasis is on MRP. Just-in-Time, and Synchronous Manufacturing. Prerequisites: MATH 2413 and 3 hours of statistics or concurrent enrollment.

ENGT 4339. Process Control Instrumentation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Introduction to process control principles and practices. Study of analog and digital signal conditioning; thermal, mechanical and optical transducers; electromechanical, pneumatic and hydraulic devices; and the application of computer-aided tools for process control instrumentation. Prerequisite: ENGT 3336, 3309. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 4346. Manufacturing Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Applications of modern manufacturing principles including: design for manufacturability, group technology, just-in-time, synchronous manufacturing, concurrent engineering, flexible manufacturing, and product management to effectively manage the manufacturing environment. Prerequisite: MATH 1314.

ENGT 4350. NUmerical Control Programming. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A continuation of I T 350 in which more advanced programming techniques are studied. Included is a study of the various N/C part programming languages, and evaluation of N/C equipment and the further refinement of the APT/NC language. Prerequisite: ENGT 3350. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 4356. Advanced Industrial Controls. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Feedback control system analysis. Proportional, integral and derivative controls of automated systems. Control system design and compensation. Analog and digital simulation. Prerequisite: MATH 2413, ENGT 3336.

ENGT 4361. Computer Aided Visualization. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

The principles of computer aided visualization and simulation as they relate to mechanical design and assemblies. Software tools will be used to analyze parametric parts and assemblies for strength, function, range of motion and interference. Photorealistic animation and images will also be produced to simulate realistic lighting, texture, and colors. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 4376. Automated Manufacturing Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An analysis of materials flows to design automated manufacturing systems in the manufacturing environment. This will include material handling systems, how computer-aided manufacturing software improves productivity, automated storage and retrieval systems, automated guided vehicles, bar-coding systems, automated warehousing, and the programming and application of robots. Prerequisites: ENGT 3336, 3386.

ENGT 4384. Internship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 6 Hours).

An approved, supervised, comprehensive work experience consisting of a minimum of 240 hours (6 weeks) in an industrial or manufacturing enterprise. Prerequisite Course(s): Junior or senior classification and approval of academic advisor and department head. The internship may be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours of credit. Field experience fee $75.

ENGT 4385. Seminar. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Topics will vary according to timeliness and special needs. May be taken more than once for credit.

ENGT 4395. Engineering Technology Projects. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A capstone projects course emphasizing a team approach to the analysis and solutions of manufacturing problems. Projects will be supplied by industry whenever possible. Emphasizes scheduling, design, working in teams, final written report and presentation. Restricted to Engineering Technology majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Lab fee $15.

Dr. George Mollick, Department Head
Department of Engineering Technology
Engineering Technology Building, Room 100
Box T-0400
Stephenville, Texas 76402
(254) 968-9010
mollick@tarleton.edu
www.tarleton.edu/engtech

Associate professors

  • Roderick
  • Mollick

Assistant professors

  • Fragoso-Diaz
  • Gray
  • Willey
  • Xu

Instructor

  • Davis