Engineering and Computer Science

The Department of Engineering and Computer Science offers degrees in Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Computer Science. Engineering and Computer Science students engage in hands-on applications of discipline-related concepts and tools, taught in an engaging, student-centered, academic success focused environment.  Our department houses state of the art instructional and research equipment including industry standard software, 3D printing, HPLC analysis, automation and robotics, hydraulic flume, 145 mph wind tunnel and a 10 kN universal testing machine. Students gain practical experience with these tools throughout the curriculum and also have the opportunity to conduct undergraduate research with our faculty. A degree from the Engineering and Computer Science Department opens doors to challenging and rewarding high-salaried, high tech engineering and computing careers.

Math Readiness

All Engineering and Computer Science degrees start with MATH 2413 Calculus I as the first mathematics course. Placement into Calculus 1 is by the CLMPE placement exam, or by college credit for MATH 1316 Plane Trigonometry OR MATH 2412Precalculus Math. Contact Tarleton's Center for Access and Academic Testing (http://www.tarleton.edu/caat/) for test information and locations. Entering students are strongly encouraged to take the CLMPE math placement exam prior to orientation so they may enroll in the proper math course. If the student is college ready in mathematics but is not prepared to take Calculus I as the first course, then he or she will be required to take MATH 2412 Precalculus MathEngineering majors who are not college ready in mathematics are designated as "Pre-engineering" (PREN) until he or she is eligible to enroll in MATH 2412 Precalculus Math, at which time the student will declare an engineering major and begin engineering coursework. 

Departmental Course Prerequisite Policy

It is important for students to stay academically prepared as they progress through their curriculum. Prerequisite (taken previously) and corequisite (taken previously or concurrently) courses are in place to establish the foundational knowledge and skills needed to be successful in any given course. For all programs in the ENCS department, students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all required Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics and Science coursework to graduate, as well as to proceed to follow-up courses. The following summarizes the policy for allowing/disallowing forward progress when prerequisite (prereq) and/or corequisite (coreq) conditions are not fully met: 

  • If a student earns an F in a prereq course or has not taken a prereq, the student may NOT enroll in the follow-up course.
  • If a student earns a D in a prereq for a course, the student IS allowed a prereq waiver to enroll in the follow-up course only if ALL THREE of the following conditions are met:
    • The student has an overall GPA of 2.2 or higher, AND 
    • If by not enrolling in the follow-up course, the student’s graduation date is adversely impacted (advisor must check the cascading effect of not enrolling in a course), AND
    • The student has not exceeded the max of FOUR prereq waivers.

If a student qualifies for a prereq waiver, the student must re-enroll in the noncompliant course concurrently; if the course is not offered concurrently the student must re-enroll on its immediate next offering. A student may utilize a maximum of FOUR prerequisite waivers over the duration of their pursuit of a degree within the ENCS Department. Changing majors within the department does not reset the waiver count. 

The department also allows a maximum of TWO engineering courses in a curriculum that can be taken as a transient (temporary) student at another university. Consult the department website, office or a faculty advisory for additional information on these policies.

Civil Engineering

The Civil Engineering program at Tarleton State University was launched in Fall 2014. Having had its first graduates in May 2017, the program is in the process of applying for accreditation from the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org, per ABET policy. The mission of the Civil Engineering program is to prepare graduates to work competently as an engineer in Civil Engineering related industries and consulting firms, for professional engineering licensure, and for graduate studies in Civil Engineering or related discipline. This is accomplished through a curriculum supported by hands-on laboratory experiences and field applications in which students develop their ability to synthesize concepts into solutions, use modern analytical tools and techniques, communicate professionally and work in a team environment. The program includes the following broad fields of specialization: structural engineering, transportation engineering, hydrology and water resources engineering, and geotechnical engineering. Additional studies in ethics and sustainable design develop students’ ability to understand the engineer's responsibilities to public safety and to protect the environment. This results in engineering graduates who strive to advance the engineering profession through technical competence, innovative problems solving and design, professional conduct and lifelong learning. Additional details can be found on the department website: www.tarleton.edu/encs.

Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all required Engineering, Mathematics and Science coursework in order to graduate. Students must also take, or be registered to take, the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) licensure exam in order to graduate.

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering

Required Courses
Placement for Calculus 1 is by the CLMPE placement exam, or by college credit for MATH 1316 or MATH 2412. Contact Tarleton's Center for Academic Testing for test information and locations.
General Education Requirements43
ENGR 1100 [shared] Transitioning to University Studies in Engineering
ENGR 1211Engineering Fundamentals I2
ENGR 1212Engineering Fundamentals II2
ENGR 2321Engineering Mechanics: Statics3
ENGR 2324Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics3
ENGR 3311Engineering Mathematical Methods3
ENGR 4259Engineering Capstone I2
ENGR 4360 [WI] Engineering Capstone II3
CVEN 2200Surveying2
CVEN 2312Intro to Civil Engineering3
CVEN 2235Civil Engineering Graphics2
CVEN 3301Structural Analysis3
CVEN 3320Construction Planning and Management3
CVEN 3423Strength of Materials4
CVEN 3430Civil Engineering Materials4
CVEN 4305Reinforced Concrete Design3
CVEN 4306Steel Design3
CVEN 4325Foundation Engineering3
CVEN 4450 [WI] Transportation Engineering4
CVEN 4360Highway Planning and Design3
ENVE 2311Soil Mechanics3
ENVE 3300Fluid Mechanics3
ENVE 3310 [WI] Engineering Hydrology3
ENVE 4310Water Resources Engineering3
Basic Science Elective:4
Physical Geology
Biology for Science Majors
CHEM 1409College Chemistry for Engineers4
PHYS 2425 [shared] University Physics I
PHYS 2426 [shared] University Physics II
MATH 2413 [shared] Calculus I
MATH 2414Calculus II4
MATH 3433Calculus III4
MATH 3306Differential Equations3
Total Hours129

Electrical Engineering

The Electrical Engineering program at Tarleton State University was launched in Fall 2014 and is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.  The mission of the Electrical Engineering program is to prepare graduates for employment in Electrical Engineering related industries, for engineering licensure, and for graduate studies in Electrical, Computer and related Engineering and Science disciplines. This is accomplished through an application-oriented curriculum and experiences in which students develop their ability to synthesize concepts into solutions, use modern analytical tools and techniques, communicate professionally and work in a team environment. The program provides both breadth and depth in topics including digital systems, electronics, signal processing and control systems. Additional studies in ethics assure that the graduate understands engineers' special obligations to society. This results in engineering graduates who strive to advance the engineering profession through technical competence, innovative problems solving and design, professional conduct, and lifelong learning. Additional details can be found on the department website: www.tarleton.edu/encs.

Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics, and Science coursework in order to graduate. Students must also take, or be registered to take, the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) licensure exam in order to graduate.

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

Required Courses
Placement for Calculus 1 is by the CLMPE placement exam, or by college credit for MATH 1316 or MATH 2412. Contact Tarleton's Center for Academic Testing for test information and locations.
General Education Requirements43
ENGR 1100 [shared] Transitioning to University Studies in Engineering
ENGR 1211Engineering Fundamentals I2
ENGR 1212Engineering Fundamentals II2
ENGR 2322Engineering Thermodynamics3
ENGR 3311Engineering Mathematical Methods3
ENGR 4259Engineering Capstone I2
ENGR 4360 [WI] Engineering Capstone II3
ELEN 2425Electrical Circuit Theory4
ELEN 2448Introduction to Digital System Design4
ELEN 3314 [WI] Signals and Systems3
ELEN 3320Engineering Analysis Techniques3
ELEN 3332Electromagnetic Field Theory3
or PHYS 3332 Electromagnetic Field Theory
ELEN 3443Computer Architecture4
ELEN 3445Electronics I4
ELEN 4336Solid State Physics3
ELEN 4441Microprocessor System Design4
ELEN 4443Linear Control System Design4
ELEN 4446Electronics II4
ELEN 4350Communication Systems Theory3
ELEN 4355Digital Signal Processing3
Advanced COSC or MATH elective - Choose from the following:3
Introduction to Data Science
NoSQL Databases
Database Theory and Practice
Computer Networks
Foundations of Mathematics
Partial Differential Equations
Mathematical Modeling
COSC 1310Procedural Programming3
CHEM 1409College Chemistry for Engineers4
PHYS 2425 [shared] University Physics I
PHYS 2426 [shared] University Physics II
MATH 2413 [shared] Calculus I
MATH 2414Calculus II4
MATH 3433Calculus III4
MATH 3306Differential Equations3
MATH 3310Discrete Mathematics3
Total Hours128

Environmental Engineering

The Environmental Engineering program at Tarleton State University is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org. The mission of the Environmental Engineering program is to prepare graduates for employment as an engineer in Environmental Engineering related industries and consulting firms, for engineering licensure, and for graduate studies in Environmental Engineering, Civil Engineering or related discipline. This is accomplished through a curriculum supported by hands-on laboratory and field experiences in which students develop their ability to synthesize concepts into solutions, use modern analytical tools and techniques, communicate professionally and work in a team environment. The program includes a breadth of topics including water and wastewater treatment, environmental risk assessment, solid and hazardous waste management, remediation engineering and project management. Additional studies in ethics and policy assure that the graduate understands the special responsibilities of an engineer related to public safety and environmental issues. This results in engineering graduates who strive to advance the engineering profession through technical competence, innovative problems solving and design, professional conduct, and lifelong learning. Additional details can be found on the department website: www.tarleton.edu/encs.

Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all Engineering, Mathematics, and Science coursework in order to graduate. Students must also take, or be registered to take, the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) licensure exam in order to graduate.

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering

Required Courses
Placement for Calculus 1 is by the CLMPE placement exam, or by college credit for MATH 1316 or MATH 2412. Contact Tarleton's Center for Academic Testing for test information and locations.
General Education Requirements43
ENGR 1100 [shared] Transitioning to University Studies in Engineering
ENGR 1211Engineering Fundamentals I2
ENGR 1212Engineering Fundamentals II2
ENGR 2322Engineering Thermodynamics3
ENGR 2251Fundamentals of GIS for Engineers2
ENGR 3311Engineering Mathematical Methods3
ENGR 4259Engineering Capstone I2
ENGR 4360 [WI] Engineering Capstone II3
CVEN 2235Civil Engineering Graphics2
ENVE 2310Introduction to Environmental Engineering3
ENVE 2311Soil Mechanics3
ENVE 2450Environmental Biotechnology4
ENVE 3300Fluid Mechanics3
ENVE 3301Environmental Systems Modeling3
ENVE 3310 [WI] Engineering Hydrology3
ENVE 3333Groundwater Contamination and Remediation3
ENVE 3340Environmental Risk Assessment3
ENVE 4302Atmospheric Systems and Air Pollution Control3
ENVE 4310Water Resources Engineering3
ENVE 4350Solid and Hazardous Waste Management3
ENVE 4320Water and Waste Water Treatment3
ENVE 4325Environmental Monitoring and Measurements3
MATH 2413 [shared] Calculus I
MATH 2414Calculus II4
MATH 3433Calculus III4
MATH 3306Differential Equations3
CHEM 1409College Chemistry for Engineers4
CHEM 2423Organic Chemistry I4
GEOL 1403Physical Geology4
BIOL 4441Limnology4
PHYS 2425 [shared] University Physics I
PHYS 2426 [shared] University Physics II
Total Hours129

Mechanical Engineering

The Mechanical Engineering program at Tarleton State University was approved in January 2017. It will seek accreditation from the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.The mission of the Mechanical Engineering program is to prepare graduates for employment as an engineer in a breadth of Mechanical Engineering related industries, for engineering licensure, and for graduate studies in Mechanical Engineering or related discipline. This is accomplished through a curriculum supported by hands-on laboratory and prototyping experiences in which students develop their ability to synthesize concepts into solutions, use modern analytical tools and techniques, communicate professionally and work in a team environment. The program includes topics such as thermal-fluid system design, mechanical system design, mechatronics, and alternative energy systems. Additional studies in ethics develop students’ ability to understand the engineer's responsibilities to society. This results in engineering graduates who strive to advance the engineering profession through technical competence, innovative problems solving and design, professional conduct, and lifelong learning. Additional details can be found on the department website: www.tarleton.edu/encs.

Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in all Engineering, Mathematics, and Science coursework in order to graduate. Students must also take, or be registered to take, the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) licensure exam in order to graduate.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering

Required Courses
General Education Requirements43
Placement for Calculus 1 is by the CLMPE placement exam, or by college credit for MATH 1316 or MATH 2412. Contact Tarleton's Center for Academic Testing for test information and locations.
ENGR 1100 [shared] Transitioning to University Studies in Engineering
ENGR 1211Engineering Fundamentals I2
ENGR 1212Engineering Fundamentals II2
ENGR 2321Engineering Mechanics: Statics3
ENGR 2322Engineering Thermodynamics3
ENGR 2324Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics3
ENGR 3311Engineering Mathematical Methods3
ENGR 4259Engineering Capstone I2
ENGR 4360 [WI] Engineering Capstone II3
ELEN 2425Electrical Circuit Theory4
ELEN 3320Engineering Analysis Techniques3
CVEN 3423Strength of Materials4
MEEN 2310Engineering CAD/CAM3
MEEN 3305Fluid Mechanics3
MEEN 3325Advanced Thermodynamics3
MEEN 3335Mechanical Vibration3
MEEN 3345Heat Transfer3
MEEN 4300 [WI] Renewable Energy Systems and Applications3
MEEN 4205Mechanical Engineering Experimental Lab2
MEEN 4310Mechanical Engineering Design I3
MEEN 4320Mechanical Engineering Design II3
MEEN 4420Thermal-Fluid System Design4
MEEN 4425Mechatronics4
MEEN 4443Linear Control Systems4
CHEM 1409College Chemistry for Engineers4
PHYS 2425 [shared] University Physics I
PHYS 2426 [shared] University Physics II
MATH 2413 [shared] Calculus I
MATH 2414Calculus II4
MATH 3433Calculus III4
MATH 3306Differential Equations3
Total Hours128

Computer Science

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science prepares graduates to enter the high-tech work force or to continue their studies at the graduate level. We offer concentrations in software engineering, data science, computer engineering, and game design. The program provides a strong foundation in hardware and software, mathematics, and general science that is aligned with curriculum standards as set forth within the computer science discipline. Students are encouraged to also specialize in a complementary technical area through technical electives. Additional details can be found on the department website: www.tarleton.edu/encs.

Student must earn a grade of “C” or better in all Computer Science, Mathematics, and technical elective coursework in order to graduate.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science

Required Courses
Placement for Calculus 1 is by the CLMPE placement exam, or by college credit for MATH 1316 or MATH 2412. Contact Tarleton's Center for Academic Testing for test information and locations.
General Education Requirements 142
COSC 1100 [shared] Transitioning to University Studies in Computer Science
MATH 2413Calculus I4
MATH 1342 [shared] Elementary Statistical Methods 2
MATH 2414Calculus II4
MATH 3310Discrete Mathematics3
PHYS 2425 [shared] University Physics I
COSC 1302Introduction to Computer Science3
COSC 1310Procedural Programming3
COSC 2331Introduction to Java Programming3
COSC 2341Data Structures3
COSC 2448Introduction to Digital Systems Design4
COSC 3443Computer Architecture4
COSC 3380Operating Systems3
COSC 3489 [WI] Software Engineering I4
COSC 4478 [WI] Computer Networks4
Technical Electives (at least 8 hours advanced)9
Total Hours93
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Computer Engineering
PHYS 2426University Physics II4
MATH 3306Differential Equations3
ELEN 2425Electrical Circuit Theory4
ELEN 3314 [WI] Signals and Systems3
Select 9 hours from the following:9
Communication Systems Theory
Digital Signal Processing
Electronics I
Linear Control System Design
COSC 4441Microprocessor System Design4
Total Hours27
Data Science
COSC 3360Introduction to Data Science3
COSC 3365NoSQL Databases3
COSC 4360Machine Learning for Data Science3
COSC 4401Database Theory and Practice4
COSC or MATH electives (at least 6 hours advanced)14
Total Hours27
Game Development
COSC 2321Object Oriented Programming3
COSC 3330Game, Graphics and GUI Development3
ARTS 2344Game Design3
ARTS 3366Level Design I3
ARTS 43673D Rendering and Lighting3
COSC or Digital Media Studies electives (at least 10 hours advanced)12
Total Hours27
Software Engineering
COSC 2321Object Oriented Programming3
COSC 3390Software Engineering II3
COSC 4389Programming Languages Fundamentals3
COSC 4401Database Theory and Practice4
COSC 4451Distributed Applications4
COSC or MATH electives (at least 6 hours advanced)10
Total Hours27
General Computer Science
COSC 2321Object Oriented Programming3
COSC 4401Database Theory and Practice4
COSC or approved MATH, BCIS, or Digital Media Studies electives (at least 15 hours advanced)20
Total Hours27
1

Please see Academic Information section.

2

Course may be counted toward general education requirement.

Computer Science Courses

COSC 1100. Transitioning to University Studies in Computer Science. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, aid in the development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, and encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective. These skill sets are presented in the context of engineering and computer science disciplines.

COSC 1302. Introduction to Computer Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

History of computers and of their applications in a variety of fields, both as PCs and as embedded systems. Overview of programming paradigms. Overview of today's most dynamic computer-related technologies, including communication networks and the Internet. A modern programming language is used to present types of problems that can be solved with computers, the underlying algorithms, and the fundamental limitations. We adopt early in this course the information-centric viewpoint, exploring the role of computers in all stages of the information life-cycle. Students apply their newly-acquired programming skills to performing basic information-processing tasks. Lab fee $15.

COSC 1310. Procedural Programming. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Introduces the fundamental concepts of structured programming. Topics include software development and methodology, data types, control structures, functions, arrays, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging. Prerequisite: One of the following: MATH 1314, MATH 1316, MATH 2412, or MATH 2413. Lab fee $2.

COSC 2321. Object Oriented Programming. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Applies the object-oriented programming paradigm using one or more object oriented programming languages, focusing on the definition and use of classes, interfaces, data encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism. An introduction to object-oriented design is presented. Prerequisite: COSC 1310. Lab fee $15.

COSC 2331. Introduction to Java Programming. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An introduction to the Java programming language. The core elements of programming are covered including control statements, primitive data elements and structures, program structure using methods, basic input and output, and the software development process. The essential object oriented programming language constructs are introduced, focusing on the definition and use of classes, interfaces, data encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism. Prerequisite: COSC 1310 Lab fee: $2.

COSC 2341. Data Structures. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Application of programming techniques, introducing the fundamental concepts of data structures and algorithms. Topics include recursion, fundamental data structures (including stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, trees, and graphs), and algorithmic analysis. Prerequisite: COSC 1310 or BCIS 3332 or BCIS 3333 Lab fee: $2.

COSC 2448. Introduction to Digital Systems Design. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Combinational and sequential digital system design techniques; programmable logic devices; computer components (ALU, memory, IO circuits); hardware description language (VHDL); introduction to machine and assembly languages. Credit for both COSC 2448 and ELEN 2448 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: COSC 1310 or concurrent registration Lab fee: $2.

COSC 3330. Game, Graphics and GUI Development. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Covers the principles and techniques used to develop GUI-based applications: window creation, dialog boxes, menus and controls. Introduces 2D and 3D graphics. Introduces the main building-blocks of game design, from a programmer's perspective, such as character animation, scene navigation, shading, modeling, game rules. Prerequisite: COSC 2331 and COSC 2341Lab fee: $2.

COSC 3344. Computer Applications in Analysis. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Binary representations of integers, floating-point numbers and characters; solutions to specific and general polynomial equations; regression and iteration techniques; approximate derivation and integration; error analysis; linear systems and matrix algorithms; other selected numerical algorithms. Prerequisites: MATH 2414 and one of the following: COSC 1310 or BCIS 3332 or BCIS 3333 Lab fee: $2.

COSC 3360. Introduction to Data Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Programming tools are used to illustrate the components of the data pipeline: data collection, cleaning, exploration, dimensionality reduction, modeling, visualization, and applications. The course includes an introduction to machine learning. Prerequisite: COSC 1310, or COSC 2321, or COSC 2331, or equivalent programming experience. Lab fee: $2.

COSC 3365. NoSQL Databases. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course provides an introduction to NoSQL database management systems, with emphasis on the document-centric model. Topics include Create, Read, Update, Delete (CRUD) operations, data processing pipelines, replication, sharding, and the MapReduce paradigm. Prerequisite: COSC 1310 or COSC 2321 or COSC 2331 or equivalent programming experience. Lab fee: $2.

COSC 3380. Operating Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Introduction to the design and development of operating systems. Analysis of current system software technology, including process management, memory organization, security, and file systems. Prerequisites: COSC 2331 and COSC 2341Lab fee $2.

COSC 3390. Software Engineering II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The course is a follow-up to Software Engineering I. The main topics are: tools used in software development, coding practices, design patterns, code smells and refactoring, and testing. Prerequisite: COSC 3489 Lab fee: $2.

COSC 3443. Computer Architecture. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Hardware and software structures found in modern digital computers. Instruction set architecture, hardwired design of the processor, assembly language programming, microprogramming, I/O and memory units, analysis of instruction usage, and hardware complexity. Credit for both COSC 3443 and ELEN 3443 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: COSC 2448 or ELEN 2448. Lab fee $15.

COSC 3489. Software Engineering I. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours). [WI]

The course is an introduction to software engineering. The main topics are software development process, software requirements, Unified Modeling Language, conceptual and behavioral modeling, software architecture, software design, and design principles. Prerequisite: COSC 2331 Lab fee: $2.

COSC 4086. Special Problems. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-4 Hours, Lab: 1-4 Hours).

Directed study of selected topics in Computer Science. May be repeated with approval of department head.

COSC 4360. Machine Learning for Data Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course is a broad introduction to machine learning algorithms, with emphasis on their application in data science. Topics include dimensionality reduction, regression, clustering, support vector machines, decision trees, naïve Bayes, and neural networks. The course includes a significant project component, with real-world data. Prerequisites: COSC 2341, COSC 3360 and MATH 1342 Lab fee: $2.

COSC 4389. Programming Languages Fundamentals. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

The course is about the principles of programming languages, concepts of language processing, program representation, and language translation and execution. The main topics are formal description of programming languages, syntax analysis, semantic analysis, code generation, and runtime systems. Prerequisite: COSC 2331, COSC 2341 Lab fee: $2.

COSC 4401. Database Theory and Practice. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Fundamental types of database models, with emphasis on relational databases. SQL, conceptual modeling, relational algebra, functional dependency theory, normalization and normal forms. File and data management principles underlying database construction. Optimization algorithms and indexing. Prerequisites: Either COSC 2341 by itself, or (MATH 3310 and one of the following: COSC 1310 or BCIS 3332 or BCIS 3333) Lab fee: $2.

COSC 4441. Microprocessor System Design. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Introduction to microprocessors; 8/16 bit single board computer hardware and software designs; chip select equations for memory board design, serial and parallel I/O interfacing; ROM, static and dynamic RAM circuits for no wait-state design; assembly language programming, stack models, subroutines and I/O processing. Credit for both COSC 4441 and ELEN 4441 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: COSC 1310; ELEN 2448 or COSC 2448. Lab fee $2.

COSC 4451. Distributed Applications. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A study of the architecture and design of distributed applications. N-tier application and supporting technologies are investigated including client/server architecture, supporting languages, transaction processing, and distribution of processes. Prerequisites: COSC 2331 and COSC 2341. Lab fee $2.

COSC 4478. Computer Networks. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours). [WI]

Bottom-up presentation of computer network hardware and protocols, going through the five main layers: physical, data link, network, transport, and application. Special emphasis is placed on the medium access control sub-layer for local area networks, IP routing, security and modern wireless access technologies. Prerequisites: Either COSC 2341 by itself, or (MATH MATH 3310 and one of the following: COSC 1310 or BCIS 3332 or BCIS 3333) Lab fee: $2.

Electrical Engineering Courses

ELEN 2425. Electrical Circuit Theory. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Resistive circuits: circuit laws, network reduction, nodal analysis, mesh analysis; energy storage elements; sinusoidal steady state; AC energy systems; magnetically coupled circuits; the ideal transformer; resonance; introduction to computer applications in circuit analysis. Prerequisites: PHYS 2426 or concurrent registration; MATH 2414 or concurrent registration. Lab fee $2.

ELEN 2448. Introduction to Digital System Design. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Combinational and sequential digital system design techniques; design of practical digital systems. Credit for both COSC 2448 and ELEN 2448 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: COSC 1310 or concurrent registration Lab fee: $2.

ELEN 3310. Power Systems Engineering. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to the generation, transmission, distribution and utilization of electric power, along with the electrical devices connected to such systems including generators, motors and transformers. Topics include: fundamentals of electric power, basic components of power systems, three-phase systems, transformers, electric machines, AC and DC motors, generators, power generation and distribution, power plants, transmission lines, and renewable energy systems. Prerequisite: ELEN 2425; MATH 3306 or concurrent registration.

ELEN 3314. Signals and Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Modeling and analysis of electrical and mechanical systems using Laplace transformation methods; transient and steady-state analysis; Fourier series; Fourier transform; elementary feedback. Prerequisites: ELEN 2425, MATH 3306 or concurrent registration.

ELEN 3320. Engineering Analysis Techniques. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

This course covers the applications and implementation of numerical algorithms commonly encountered in engineering and scientific analyses. Topics may include statistical analysis, analysis of linear and non-linear systems, optimization and linear programming, numerical differentiation and integration, and analysis of differential equations. Use of MATLAB (or other similar computational tools) for performing computational analysis and generating graphical interpretations of the results is also included. Prerequisite: ENGR 1212 or COSC 1310; MATH 2414 Lab fee: $2.

ELEN 3332. Electromagnetic Field Theory. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides the background necessary to formulate and solve electromagnetic problems relevant to many fields of electrical engineering such as RF and microwave circuits, photonics, wireless networks, computers, bioengineering, and nanoelectronics. Topics include: static electric and magnetic fields; Maxwell’s equations in integral and differential forms; wave propagation; reflection and refraction of plane waves; transient and steady-state behavior of waves on transmission lines. Prerequisites: PHYS 2426; MATH 3306 and MATH 3433 or concurrent registrations.

ELEN 3360. Microwave Theory. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course covers the key concepts related to the analysis and design of microwave systems at the subsystem and component level. Topics include: waveguides and wave propagation on transmission lines, including stripline and microstrip structures; microwave network analysis; impedance matching techniques; analysis and design of microwave resonators; power dividers, couplers, and hybrids; microwave filters; noise and distortion in microwave circuits; an introduction to microwave system implementation. Prerequisites: ELEN 3314, 3445, and either ELEN 3332 or PHYS 3332.

ELEN 3443. Computer Architecture. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Hardware and software structures found in modern digital computers. Instruction set architecture, hardwired design of the processor, assembly language programming, microprogramming, I/O and memory units, analysis of instruction usage, and hardware complexity. Credit for both COSC 3443 and ELEN 3443 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: COSC 2448 or ELEN 2448. Lab fee $2.

ELEN 3445. Electronics I. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A first course in microelectronics intended to give students an introduction to the analysis and design of analog and digital integrated circuits. Topics include: semiconductor physics theory and operating principles of the p-n junction, MOS field effect transistor (MOSFET), and bipolar junction transistor (BJT); operational amplifiers; large- and small-signal equivalent circuit models of diodes, MOSFETs, and BJTs; single-transistor amplifier configurations; digital logic circuits. Prerequisite: ELEN 2425; ELEN 3314 or concurrent registration Lab fee: $2.

ELEN 4086. Special Problems. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-4 Hours, Lab: 1-4 Hours).

Directed study of selected topics in Electrical Engineering. May be repeated with approval of department head.

ELEN 4336. Solid State Physics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course covers the basic principles required to understand the operation of solid-state devices with an emphasis on device physics. Semiconductor fundamentals including crystals and energy bands, charge carriers (electrons and holes), doping, and transport (drift and diffusion); basic concepts of generation-recombination and the P-N junction as capacitors and current rectifier; semiconductor device equations developed from fundamental concepts; P-N junction theory developed and applied to the analysis of devices such as varactors, bipolar transistors, and field-effect transistors. Prerequisites: ELEN 3445 and MATH 3306.

ELEN 4350. Communication Systems Theory. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to the frequency and time domain; modulation; random signal theory; network analysis using nondeterministic signals; basic information theory; noise. Prerequisites: ELEN 3314 and ELEN 2425.

ELEN 4355. Digital Signal Processing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to discrete-time signal processing and discrete-time systems. Topics include: discrete-time linear systems, difference equations, z-transforms, discrete convolution, stability, discrete-time Fourier transforms, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, digital filter design, discrete Fourier transforms and fast Fourier transforms, spectral analysis, and applications of digital signal processing. Prerequisite: ELEN 3314.

ELEN 4441. Microprocessor System Design. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Introduction to microprocessors; 8/16 bit single board computer hardware and software designs; chip select equations for memory board design, serial and parallel I/O interfacing; ROM, static and dynamic RAM circuits for no wait-state design; assembly language programming, stack models, subroutines and I/O processing. Credit for both COSC 4441 and ELEN 4441 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: COSC 1310; ELEN 2448 or COSC 2448. Lab fee: $2.

ELEN 4443. Linear Control System Design. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Application of state variable and frequency domain techniques to modeling and analysis of single input, single output linear control systems; physical implementation of control systems by integrating sensors, actuators and other control system components; use of software design tools. Prerequisite: ELEN 2425, MATH 3306, and either ELEN 3320 or COSC 3344. Lab fee $2.

ELEN 4446. Electronics II. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A second course in microelectronics emphasizing the analysis and design of analog integrated circuits. Topics include: MOSFET and BJT fabrication technologies; current mirrors and biasing techniques; amplifier topologies; frequency response of analog integrated circuits; feedback, stability, and amplifier compensation techniques; output stages; noise in integrated circuits; linear integrated circuit applications. Prerequisites: ELEN 3445 and ELEN 3314 Lab fee: $2.

Engineering Physics Courses

ENPH 3332. Electromagnetic Field Theory. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides the background necessary to formulate and solve electromagnetic problems relevant to many fields of electrical engineering such as RF and microwave circuits, photonics, wireless networks, computers, bioengineering, and nanoelectronics. Topics include: static electric and magnetic fields; Maxwell’s equations in integral and differential forms; wave propagation; reflection and refraction of plane waves; transient and steady-state behavior of waves on transmission lines. Prerequisites: PHYS 2426; MATH 3306 and MATH 3433 or concurrent registrations.

ENPH 3360. Microwave Theory. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course covers the key concepts related to the analysis and design of microwave systems at the subsystem and component level. Topics include: waveguides and wave propagation on transmission lines, including stripline and microstrip structures; microwave network analysis; impedance matching techniques; analysis and design of microwave resonators; power dividers, couplers, and hybrids; microwave filters; noise and distortion in microwave circuits; an introduction to microwave system implementation considerations. Prerequisites: ENPH 3314, ENPH 3332.

ENPH 4086. Special Problems. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-4 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Directed study of selected topics in Engineering Physics. May be repeated with approval of department head.

Engineering Technology Courses

ENGT 1100. Transitioning to University Studies in Engineering Technology. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, aid in the development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, and encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective. These skill sets are presented in the context of Engineering Technology.

ENGT 1305. Principles of Drafting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

An introduction to mechanical drafting involving geometrical constructions, orthographic projection, dimensioning techniques, sectional views, auxiliary views, isometric views, and other topics related to manufacturing and other areas of drafting. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 1306. Applied Statics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course will focus on understanding the resolution and composition of forces and moments; free-body diagrams; equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; simple structures; friction; centroid; moments of inertia. Prerequisite: Concurrent with MATH 1316 or 2412.

ENGT 1317. Machining Technology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

A study of metals and their machining characteristics and application. Emphasis is placed on layout, precision measurement, and heat treating. Laboratory experiences include work with sheet metal, metal casting, and metal lathe operation. Lab fee $2.

ENGT 2303. Engineering Economy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles of economics equivalence; time value of money, analysis of single and multiple investments; comparison of alternatives; capital recovery and tax implications; certainty; uncertainty; risk analysis; public sector analysis; and break-even concepts. Prerequisite: MATH 1316, MATH 2412, or MATH 2413.

ENGT 2309. Electrical Circuits. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 5 Hours).

Principles of electricity, magnetism, and basic laws. Fundamentals of analog and digital electronic components and circuits, including applied areas. Laboratory involves experiments with basic circuits and test equipment. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 2310. Introduction to Manufacturing Processes. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of metals and their machining characteristics and application. Emphasis is placed on layout, precision measurement, and heat treating. Laboratory experiences include work with sheet metal, metal casting, and metal lathe operation. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 2335. Solid Modeling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of complex three-dimensional solid models used in the fields of mechanical engineering, sheet metal, welding, and other areas of manufacturing and engineering. Orthographic views projected from solid models and annotation techniques are used to produce engineering drawings. Prerequisite: ENGT 1305 or 3 semester hours of drafting or approval of the instructor. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3099. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 3-9 Hours).

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to integrate academic study with work experience that is germane to their major or minor. Enrollment requires a two-semester minimum commitment that may be accomplished by 1) alternating semesters of full-time study with semesters of curriculum-related employment, or 2) enrolling in courses at least half-time (6 semester hours) and working part-time in parallel positions of curriculum-related employment. The department Cooperative Education advisor will supervise the student's experience and assign the final grade based on the student's final report which is required to complete the course. Students may participate in the Cooperative Education program for an unlimited number of semesters but a maximum of 6 hours credit may be counted toward a degree. Prerequisites: Completion of 30 semester hours which includes 12 hours in the major or minor discipline in which the Cooperative Education course is desired, minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the appropriate major or minor field, and department head approval. Field experiences fee $50.

ENGT 3301. Applied Dynamics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course will focus on understanding the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. It will cover general particle and two-dimensional rigid body motion and will include the concepts of impulse and momentum and the principle of work and energy. Prerequisites: MATH 2413 and ENGT 1306.

ENGT 3303. Industrial Materials. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours). [WI]

A study of the structure, properties, processing, and application of metallic, polymeric, ceramic, and composite materials utilized in manufacturing. Laboratory exercises include processing methods, physical and mechanical testing, modification of properties, manufacturing applications, and material identification. Prerequisites: CHEM 1411 and ENGL 1302 Lab fee $2.

ENGT 3304. Manufacturing Materials. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A study of the properties, processing, and application of metallic, polymeric, ceramic, and composite materials utilized in manufacturing. Emphasis is placed on broad characteristics and applications of industrial materials.

ENGT 3305. Machine Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Application of mechanics and strength of materials to the analysis, synthesis and design of machine elements; theories of failure, stress concentrations, fatigue life and thermal stress, consideration of economics and safety; projects in creative mechanical design. Prerequisite: MATH 2413 and ENGT 3313.

ENGT 3309. Control Systems for Mechanical Application. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Application of computers to control industrial processes. Study of continuous- and discrete-time control algorithms; digital signal processing; and system control concepts applied to process control. Prerequisite: ENGT 2303. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 3313. Mechanics of Materials. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Stresses and strains in elastic members under tensile, compressive, shearing, torsional and bending loads; combined stresses; shear and moment diagrams; Mohr’s circle; deflection of beams; thin-walled pressure vessels; stability of columns and buckling. Prerequisites: Concurrent with MATH 2413 and ENGT 1306.

ENGT 3314. Principles of Technology Education. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the Texas Technology Education curriculum, to include the areas of communication, manufacturing, construction, energy, power, transportation, computer applications, bio-related technology, electricity, electronics, graphics, principles of technology, and other related technologies.

ENGT 3316. Manufacturing Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of organizational and production techniques used in manufacturing. A thematic team approach will be used to design and produce a product using principles of mass production. Concepts of manufacturing that will be studied will include: principles of tooling, quality, plant layout, resource planning and scheduling. Prerequisites: ENGT 1305, 1317.

ENGT 3317. Machine Tool Technology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Fundamentals and principles of metal removal processes. Emphasis is placed on metal lathes, milling machines, grinding machines, and electric discharge machines. Prerequisite: ENGT 1317. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3318. Research and Reporting For Technologists. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A study of research tools, methods, and data collection techniques used in the field of Engineering Technology. Emphasis will be placed on gathering, analyzing, and presenting technical information related to manufacturing topics in both oral and written form. Technical reports, product documentation, and correspondence will also be discussed.

ENGT 3319. Motor Control and Machine Automation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A study of power transformers, single and multiphase circuits. The study of DC machines, AC single and multiphase synchronous and induction machines, and an introduction to power electronics. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 3320. Industrial Safety. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of principles and practices used to establish a safe and healthful environment for industrial personnel. Includes a study of general industrial safety, safety and health regulation agencies, hazard recognition and correction, and first aid. Credit for both ENGT 3320 and MGMT 3320 will not be awarded.

ENGT 3323. Computer-Aided Design with AutoCAD. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The application of the principles of computer-aided design as they relate to manufacturing and construction. Computerized generation of drafting and design data, using AutoCAD, to create two- and three-dimensional geometries.

ENGT 3324. Applied Polymer Processing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course is a study of thermoplastic and thermosetting materials and processes used in plastics manufacturing. Emphasis will be placed on injection molding, thermoforming, extrusion, rotational casting, elastomeric mold fabrication, resin casting, and coatings. Also, the impact of material selection on processing parameters will be stressed. Prerequisite: ENGT 3303. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 3325. Composites Manufacturing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course includes a study of basic organic-matrix composites manufacturing and assembly processes, especially as these relate to aerospace and construction composite products. Lab exercises will include composite hand layup procedures, composite tool design, pultrusion, and assembly processes for composite products. Prerequisite: ENGT 3303. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 3326. Ergonomics and Work Methods. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to the design of man-machine systems with particular emphasis on the application of ergonomics to the manufacturing workplace and environment. Use of anthropometric data in design; limitations of human performance; effects of environmental stress on work performance, safety, and health. Lab fee $2.

ENGT 3327. Mechanical Analysis. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

The course provides information on the current state of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) technology, underlying theory, and its use in engineering design. The primary focus of the course is on linear static analysis. More advanced techniques such as nonlinear analysis in FEA will be covered if time permits. Software will be used to perform FEA on lab projects. Prerequisite: ENGT 3313.

ENGT 3336. Industrial Controls. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

The theory and application of electronic programmable devices such as programmable logic controllers, temperature controllers, counters, etc. Emphasis is also given to control devices using pneumatics and hydraulics. Ladder logic and input/output devices will be emphasized. Lab Fee: $10.00.

ENGT 3345. Industrial Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

An application based course that exposes students to industrial design and provides experience in the varied aspects of the design process, culminating in a final, individual design project. Topics include, but are not limited to: Working drawings, tolerancing, dimensioning, material selection and pricing, sketching and proper design techniques. Prerequisite: ENGT 2335 or approval of the instructor. Lab fee $2.

ENGT 3350. Numerical Control Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Principles, techniques, and applications of numerically controlled machine tools. Application of the APT system. Laboratory experiences in processing, writing, debugging, and processing the N/C part program. Prerequisite: ENGT 1317 or approval of the instructor. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 3360. Safety Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Occupational safety engineering and management with emphasis on control of hazardous materials, fire prevention, safety considerations in production facility design and maintenance, and operation of effective safety programs.

ENGT 3375. Continuous Improvement. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The role of the manufacturing engineer in continuous improvement projects to improve design and production processes. The student will utilize modern tools and techniques for planning and managing continuous improvement projects, integrating and deploying change programs, data based decision making, and resource management.

ENGT 3385. Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course is an introduction to fluid mechanics, and emphasizes fundamental concepts and problem-solving techniques. Topics to be covered include fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid kinematics, control volume analysis, internal flows (pipe flows), and external flows (lift and drag). Brief introductions to computational fluid dynamics (CFD), compressible flow, and fluid power systems such as turbomachinery (pumps and turbines) will also be provided. Prerequisites: MATH 2413.

ENGT 3386. Quality Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the application of various methods used by manufacturing to quantify product quality. This will include a review of the ASTM, ANSI, and ISO tests as they apply to metallic, polymeric, ceramic, and composite materials. Statistical Quality Control, Statistical Process Control, Total Quality Management, and ISO 9000 will also be investigated. Laboratory assignments will acquaint the student with the variety of instrumentation that is used in quality control and their use. Lab fee $2.

ENGT 3393. Modular Technology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course will investigate various systems used in modular technology education. Modular technology studies will include broadcasting technology, applied physics, power energy, transportation, graphic communication, composites, and computer application. Prerequisite: junior standing. Lab fee $15.

ENGT 3395. Fundamentals of Industrial Project Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

As an introductory course for project management, the course covers essential elements to successfully initiate and complete a project in general. Topics will include five of the basic elements of project management; project initiation, planning, executing, controlling and closing a project. The course includes the use of Project Management software.

ENGT 395. Industrial Project Management. 5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

ENGT 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to meet the needs of Engineering Technology students who have above average academic ability and who need to pursue subject matter that is not normally included in the Engineering Technology curriculum. Approval for enrollment in this course shall be with the concurrence of the individual instructor and the department head. The student must be currently enrolled in one of the majors offered in the Engineering Technology Department. Prerequisite: completion of 30 or more hours in the Department of Engineering Technology.

ENGT 4303. Weld Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

This course presents the basics of weld design, welded structure manufacturing, and structural design as it applies to welded structures.

ENGT 4305. Architectural Drafting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A course in residential architectural drafting using computer-aided drafting. Emphasis is placed on residential design and home planning. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 4320. Occupational Safety and Health. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of principles and practices used to establish a safety and health program within industrial and retail environments. The course includes a study of general safety regulations and occupational safety program strategies as they pertain to internal organizational efforts. Related topics such as safety and health regulation agencies, hazard recognition and correction, and first aid.

ENGT 4322. Applied Thermodynamics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

The study of the basic concepts and laws of thermodynamics and the application of these laws or principles to simple engineering systems. Topics include the First Law of Thermodynamics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties, and various cycles. Prerequisite: MATH 2414.

ENGT 4326. Applications of Linear Programming and Optimization. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

An introduction to applications of linear and nonlinear programming, single and multiple objective optimization, sensitivity, forecasting, queuing theory, and decision analysis. The student will be able to implement these concepts using a COTS software application as applied in industrial and public settings. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 4336. Production Planning. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the principles and theory used in the design and maintenance of production operations and inventory systems. These include forecasting techniques, inventory models, production control models and assembly line balancing. Particular emphasis is on MRP. Just-in-Time, and Synchronous Manufacturing.

ENGT 4339. Process Control Instrumentation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Introduction to process control principles and practices. Study of analog and digital signal conditioning; thermal, mechanical and optical transducers; electromechanical, pneumatic and hydraulic devices; and the application of computer-aided tools for process control instrumentation. Prerequisite: ENGT 3336, 3309. Lab fee: $2.

ENGT 4346. Manufacturing Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Applications of modern manufacturing principles including: design for manufacturability, group technology, just-in-time, synchronous manufacturing, concurrent engineering, flexible manufacturing, and product management to effectively manage the manufacturing environment.

ENGT 4347. Metrics and Measurements. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course covers topics in ergonomics, the man-machine interface, managing worker methods, and time studies. We will cover topics that lead to measuring and monitoring work both by human and machines. Prerequisite: ENGT 3375.

ENGT 4350. NUmerical Control Programming. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A continuation of I T 350 in which more advanced programming techniques are studied. Included is a study of the various N/C part programming languages, and evaluation of N/C equipment and the further refinement of the APT/NC language. Prerequisite: ENGT 3350. Lab fee $10.

ENGT 4356. Advanced Industrial Controls. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Feedback control system analysis. Proportional, integral and derivative controls of automated systems. Control system design and compensation. Analog and digital simulation. Prerequisite: MATH 2413, ENGT 3336.

ENGT 4361. Computer Aided Manufacturing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The principles of computer aided manufacturing and simulation as they relate to mechanical design and assemblies. Software tools will be used to analyze parametric parts and assemblies for strength, function, range of motion and interference. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor.

ENGT 4375. Facility Planning. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course covers topics in Facilities Planning and design for Operations. We will cover topics that lead to making good decisions for facility layout including product, process flow, material handling, and facility location techniques. Prerequisite: ENGT 3375.

ENGT 4376. Automated Manufacturing Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An analysis of materials flows to design automated manufacturing systems in the manufacturing environment. This will include material handling systems, how computer-aided manufacturing software improves productivity, automated storage and retrieval systems, automated guided vehicles, bar-coding systems, automated warehousing, and the programming and application of robots.

ENGT 4384. Internship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 6 Hours).

An approved, supervised, comprehensive work experience consisting of a minimum of 240 hours (6 weeks) in an industrial or manufacturing enterprise. Prerequisite Course(s): Junior or senior classification and approval of academic advisor and department head. The internship may be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours of credit. Field experience fee $75.

ENGT 4385. Seminar. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Topics will vary according to timeliness and special needs. May be taken more than once for credit.

ENGT 4395. Engineering Technology Projects. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

A capstone projects course emphasizing a team approach to the analysis and solutions of manufacturing problems. Projects will be supplied by industry whenever possible. Emphasizes scheduling, design, working in teams, final written report and presentation. Restricted to Engineering Technology majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Lab fee $15.

Engineering Courses

ENGR 1100. Transitioning to University Studies in Engineering. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, aid in the development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, and encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective. These skill sets are presented in the context of engineering and computer science disciplines.

ENGR 1211. Engineering Fundamentals I. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Introduction to engineering fundamentals including problem solving, algorithm development, and design; computer applications including spreadsheet and programming; engineering as a profession, ethics, teamwork and communication. Corequisite: MATH 2412 or 1316. Lab fee: $20.

ENGR 1212. Engineering Fundamentals II. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Development of skills in problem solving, design, analysis, estimation, communication and teamwork; introduction to accounting and conservation principles in engineering sciences emphasis on computer applications and programming. Prerequisites: ENGR 1211; MATH 2413 or concurrent registration, PHYS 2425 or concurrent registration. Lab fee: $20.

ENGR 2251. Fundamentals of GIS for Engineers. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 3 Hours).

This course offers an introduction to methods of managing and processing geographic information. Basic principles of geographic information systems and their use in spatial analysis and information management are introduced. Students gain experience with cutting-edge geospatial technologies and an understanding of their capabilities. Application in engineering is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 2413 or concurrent registration Lab fee: $2.

ENGR 2303. Engineering Economy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles of economics equivalence; time value of money, analysis of single and multiple investments; comparison of alternatives; capital recovery and tax implications; certainty; uncertainty; risk analysis; public sector analysis; and break-even concepts. Prerequisites: MATH 2413 or concurrent registration.

ENGR 2321. Engineering Mechanics: Statics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Theory and analysis of bodies in equilibrium, including vector algebra, Newtonian mechanics, forces due to friction; forces acting on members of trusses and frame structures, and determinations of centroids and moments of inertia. Prerequisites: ENGR 1212; PHYS 2425 or concurrent registration; and MATH 2414 or concurrent registration.

ENGR 2322. Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Theory and application of energy methods in engineering; conservation principles to investigate traditional thermodynamics (e.g., temperature, thermodynamic equilibrium, and heat). Prerequisite: ENGR 1212; MATH 2414 or concurrent registration.

ENGR 2324. Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Application of theory and principles of mechanics to dynamic particles and rigid body systems in rectilinear and curvilinear systems, including forces, acceleration, conservation of energy, and impulse and momentum. Prerequisites: ENGR 2321 and MATH 2414.

ENGR 2451. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This is a cross-listed course with GEOG 2451 Intro to GIS. Basic concepts of design, planning and implementation of geographic information systems. Students will learn how to create, manipulate, project, and interpret geographic information. Students are encouraged to take GEOG 1451: Pre-GIS before this course. Lab fee: $2.

ENGR 3255. Engineering Management. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 3 Hours).

Application of project management, quality engineering, economic analysis, and systems engineering; use of project management and systems engineering software; topics include lean system design, six sigma quality, continuous improvement, earned value management, costing, scheduling and engineering ethics. Prerequisite: ENGR 3311; ENVE 2310 or CVEN 2310 or ELEN 2425 Lab fee: $2.

ENGR 3300. Fundamentals of Circuit Theory. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Fundamentals of AC and DC circuit analysis, AC power, electronics, and digital logic; hardware and software implementation and analysis of circuits; this course is for non-electrical engineering majors. Credit will not be awarded for both ENGR 3300 and ELEN 2425. Prerequisite: PHYS 2426 or concurrent registration; MATH 3306 or concurrent registration Lab fee: $2.

ENGR 3311. Engineering Mathematical Methods. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course presents mathematical techniques frequently encountered in advanced engineering analyses. The topics include the following areas: linear algebra, including matrix and eigenvalue applications; probability and statistics, including descriptive and inferential statistics, probability densities, statistical simulations and quality control. Prerequisites: MATH 2413 and ENGR 1212.

ENGR 4086. Special Problems. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-4 Hours, Lab: 1-4 Hours).

Directed study of selected topics in Engineering. May be repeated with approval of department head.

ENGR 4259. Engineering Capstone I. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 3 Hours).

This course is the first part of the capstone design experience synthesizing knowledge, skills and values necessary in engineering practice. Includes FE review sessions, engineering ethics, design process including multiple realistic constraints such as social, economic, safety, and sustainability, and the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context. During this course students develop a proposal for their capstone project. Prerequisite: Within one year of graduation with one of the engineering BS degrees. Lab fee: $2.

ENGR 4360. Engineering Capstone II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 4 Hours). [WI]

This course is part 2 of the culminating design experience in the last year of the curriculum used to integrate the student's education. Includes reference to business concepts, mathematics, science, engineering and humanities. Emphasizes team work, a holistic approach to problem solving, and incorporates appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. Prerequisite: ENGR 4259 Lab fee: $2.

Environmental Engineering Courses

ENVE 2310. Introduction to Environmental Engineering. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to environmental and occupational health, atmospheric systems and air pollution control, hazardous waste management, solid waste management, waste water management, and water supply treatment. Prerequisites: CHEM 1409 or CHEM 1412, and MATH 2414.

ENVE 2311. Soil Mechanics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Introduction to the principles of soil and their influence on the hydrological cycle, Darcy's law and fluid flow through porous medium, stress distribution and consolidation of soil, subsurface exploration. Prerequisite: MATH 2413; PHYS 2425 or concurrent enrollment Lab fee: $2.

ENVE 2450. Environmental Biotechnology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Application of fundamental principles of aquatic chemistry, molecular biology and biochemistry to understand and analyze complex chemical/biological processes in environmental engineering (natural and engineered systems). Prerequisites: CHEM 1409 or CHEM 1412, and MATH 2413 Lab fee: $2.

ENVE 3300. Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Principles of hydrostatics, dynamics of viscous and inviscid non-viscous fluids, resistance to flow in pipes and open channels, transport processes, energy equation, Bernoulli equation, conservation of mass, conservation of momentum, pump characteristics, similitude, dimensional analysis. Includes an introduction to computational analysis of fluid flow and pressure distributions and laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: PHYS 2425 and MATH 2414 Lab fee: $2.

ENVE 3301. Environmental Systems Modeling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Apply conceptual and numerical techniques to model environmental systems. Use differential equations to describe processes. Prerequisites: MATH 3306 and ENVE 2310 Lab fee: $2.

ENVE 3310. Engineering Hydrology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Study of the hydrologic cycle, precipitation processes, soil moisture, infiltration, groundwater, rainfall-runoff processes, utilization of water resources, and frequency analysis; introduction to HEC-HMS programs for modeling hydrologic processes, elementary principles of field work. Credit for both HYDR 3410 and ENVE 3310 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: ENVE 2310 or CVEN 2312.

ENVE 3333. Groundwater Contamination and Remediation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of subsurface flow with emphasis on the examination of the fate and transport of inorganic and organic contaminants therein and their management. Topics include groundwater flow and well hydraulics, modeling of contaminant transport processes, site investigations, natural attenuation, remediation and legal issues in groundwater protection. Prerequisite: ENVE 3310; MATH 3306 or concurrent registration.

ENVE 3340. Environmental Risk Assessment. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Introduction to the fundamentals of environmental and ecological risk assessment, including toxicity assessment, characterizing fate and transport processes in various environmental media, evaluating exposure pathways, dose-response assessment and modeling uncertainty. Prerequisites: ENVE 2310 and ENGR 3311 Lab fee: $2.

ENVE 3400. Fluid Mechanics. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Principles of hydrostatics, dynamics of viscous and inviscid non-viscous fluids, resistance to flow in pipes and open channels, transport processes, energy equation, Bernoulli equation, conservation of mass, conservation of momentum, pump characteristics, similitude, dimensional analysis. Includes an introduction to computational analysis of fluid flow and pressure distributions and laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: PHYS 2425 and MATH 2414. Lab fee: $2.

ENVE 3401. Environmental Systems Modeling. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Apply conceptual and numerical techniques to model environmental systems. Use differential equations to describe processes. Prerequisites: MATH 3306 and ENVE 2310. Lab fee $2.

ENVE 3420. Groundwater Hydrology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Topics include aquifer characteristics, infiltration, fluid dynamics of groundwater flow, potential flows, well analysis, water quality, groundwater pollution, legal issues in groundwater. Credit for both HYDR 320 and ENVE 320 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: ENVE 2411, GEOL 1403 or ENVE 2310, CHEM 1412, MATH 2414. Lab fee $10.

ENVE 3440. Environmental Risk Assessment. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Introduction to the fundamentals of environmental and ecological risk assessment, including toxicity assessment, characterizing fate and transport processes in various environmental media, evaluating exposure pathways, dose-response assessment and modeling uncertainty. Prerequisite: ENVE 2310 and either ENGR 3311 or MATH 3311 Lab fee: $2.

ENVE 4086. Special Problems. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-4 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Directed study of selected topics in Environmental Engineering. May be repeated with approval of department head.

ENVE 4302. Atmospheric Systems and Air Pollution Control. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Study of atmospheric impact on air pollution. Study of sources of air pollution and their control to include gases and particulate matter. Study of air pollution regulations and air pollution modeling. Design of systems to control and abate air pollution. Study and design of sampling systems to monitor air pollution. Prerequisite: CHEM 1409, ENGR 2322.

ENVE 4310. Water Resources Engineering. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Fundamentals of hydraulics applicable to open channel flow, natural streams and waterways; irrigation flow characteristics; hydrologic analysis; fluid measurement methods; introduction to hydraulic models including HEC-RAS; and economic aspects of water resources. Prerequisite: ENVE 2310 or CVEN 2312, ENVE 3300.

ENVE 4320. Water and Waste Water Treatment. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Treatment and distribution of residential and industrial water supplies, waste water treatment and disposal methods of municipal and industrial systems, environmental toxicology; aspects of groundwater monitoring and water quality maintenance. Laboratory analysis of water and waste water quality. Design of elementary treatment, distribution, and collection systems. Prerequisites: CHEM 2423, ENVE 2310, and ENVE 3300.

ENVE 4325. Environmental Monitoring and Measurements. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 3 Hours).

Studying and analyzing environmental engineering processes and systems through appropriate experimental methods. The course will include sampling, protocol development and design of experiments, relevant measurement techniques and experimental methods. Emphasis on quality control, calibration, documentation and interpretation of results facilitating the development of best practice approaches for experimental design and analysis. Prerequisite: ENVE 2450, ENVE 4320 Lab fee: $2.

ENVE 4330. Texas Water Resource Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

The ecological relation of water in this biosphere with special reference to the human role; the role of behavioral sciences (social, legal, economic, political, and psychological) in the development, conservation, regulation, and utilization of water resources; current political structure and laws pertaining to the administration of water resources in the state of Texas. Prerequisites: ENVE 3310 and GOVT 2306.

ENVE 4340. Advanced GIS Applications. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 3 Hours).

The course presents the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Civil and Environmental Engineering. The components of ArcGIS and applications in the field of sustainable natural resource planning and management are discussed. Introduction to and hands-on experience with (a) data acquisition and processing, (b) hydrologic terrain analysis, (c) soil and land use mapping, (d) transportation network planning and (e) geostatistical and spatial analysis are provided. Prerequisite: ENGR 2451/GEOG 2451/EASC 2451/ENVS 2451/WSES 2451 Lab fee: $2.

ENVE 4350. Solid and Hazardous Waste Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to provide students with the necessary background and knowledge pertaining to the engineering design of solid and hazardous waste management and disposal. Topics covered include landfill design, resource conservation recovery and reuse, hazardous waste management. Prerequisites: CHEM 1409 or CHEM 1412, and ENVE 2310.

ENVE 4420. Water and Waste Water Treatment. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Treatment and distribution of residential and industrial water supplies, waste water treatment and disposal methods of municipal and industrial systems, environmental toxicology; aspects of groundwater monitoring and water quality maintenance. Laboratory analysis of water and waste water quality. Design of elementary treatment, distribution, and collection systems. Prerequisites: CHEM 2423, ENVE 2310, and ENVE 3400 Lab fee $2.

Mechanical Engineering Courses

MEEN 1310. Engineering Computer Aided Design. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Fundamentals of engineering graphics and solid modeling using computer aided drafting tools; application of drafting software to problem solving and design. Prerequisite: MATH 2412 or concurrent registration. Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 2210. Engineering Computer Aided Design. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 3 Hours).

Fundamentals of engineering design and solid modeling using computer aided drafting tools; application of solid modeling, analysis and simulation software and 3-D printing to problem solving and design. Prerequisite: ENGR 1212; MATH 2413 (corequisite) Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 2310. Engineering CAD/CAM. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Application of solid modeling, analysis and simulation software and 3-D printing to problem solving and design. Fundamentals of engineering design and solid modeling using computer-aided drafting tools. Standard terminologies, conventions, processes, operations, design and operational characteristics of key hardware components, programming techniques, applications, merits and demerits of Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) machines. Prerequisite: ENGR 1212; MATH 2413 or concurrent registration Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 3305. Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an introduction to fluid mechanics, and emphasizes fundamental concepts and problem-solving techniques. Topics to be covered include fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid kinematics, control volume analysis, dimensional analysis, internal flows (pipe flows), and external flows (lift and drag). Brief introductions to computational fluid dynamics (CFD), compressible flow, and fluid power systems such as turbomachinery (pumps and turbines) will also be provided. Prerequisite: PHYS 2425, MATH 2414, ENGR 2322.

MEEN 3310. Design for Manufacturability. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

System-level design optimization including manufacturing, assembly, testing and service. Includes materials and manufacturing process selection. Prerequisites: MEEN 2210, CVEN 3423, ENGR 2321, and ENGR 2324 Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 3314. Signals and Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Modeling and analysis of electrical and mechanical systems using Laplace transformation methods; transient and steady-state analysis; Fourier series; Fourier transform; elementary feedback. Prerequisite: ELEN 2425, MATH 3306 or concurrent registration.

MEEN 3325. Advanced Thermodynamics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Design of power and refrigeration systems, mixing or separation, multiphase, air conditioning and energy conversion processes; engine design and operating parameters dealing with thermo-chemistry of fuel air mixtures-properties of working fluids; power cycle analysis with thermodynamic properties and working fluids. Prerequisite: ENGR 2322, MATH 3306.

MEEN 3335. Mechanical Vibration. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Modeling, analysis and design for mechanical vibrations. Fundamentals of free vibration, harmonically excited vibration and vibration under general forcing conditions for one degree and multidegree of freedom systems; vibration design strategies including isolation and absorbers; analysis of mechanical systems for stability, resonance, damping, and modal coupling. Prerequisite: ENGR 2324, MATH 3306 Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 3345. Heat Transfer. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; steady-state and unsteady heat conduction; free and forced convection heat transfer; radiative heat transfer; heat exchanger analysis. Prerequisite: ENGR 2322, MEEN 3305, MATH 3306.

MEEN 3350. Measurement System Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Design of measurement systems including hardware and software specifications, design, prototyping and testing. Includes fundamentals of data acquisition, design of experiments, instrumentation and sensor calibration commonly used in industry and research (e.g., sensors, signal conversion and conditioning, and wireless data communications). Prerequisite: ELEN 3314, MEEN 2210, PHYS 2426 Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 3400. Fluid Mechanics. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Perform analyses involving hydrostatics, fluid dynamics, pipe flow, open-channel flow, pumps, and dimensional analysis. Design and conduct fluid mechanics experiments. Perform computer simulations of fluid processes. Prerequisites: PHYS 2425 and MATH 2414 Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 3440. Heat Transfer. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Steady and transient conduction in one- and two-dimensions; forced and natural convection; radiation; phase change; basic heat exchangers design; elements of thermal system design. Includes an introduction to computational analysis of heat transfer and temperature distributions and laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: ENGR 2322 Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 4086. Special Problems. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-4 Hours, Lab: 1-4 Hours).

Directed study of selected topics in Mechanical Engineering. May be repeated with approval of department head.

MEEN 4205. Mechanical Engineering Experimental Lab. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 3 Hours).

Experimentation and measurements in fluid mechanics and heat transfer; efficiency analysis; design of experiment; data processing and analysis; report writing. Prerequisite: MEEN 3305, MEEN 3345 Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 4300. Renewable Energy Systems and Applications. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Study of renewable energy sources, future demands, energy management and conservation techniques with focus on sources such as solar energy, biomass (conversions), wind power, geothermal energy, ocean energy, fuel cells and hydro power; assessing the viability of renewable energy systems; and analysis of renewable energy systems, applications, backup energy needs and economic factors. Prerequisites: MEEN 3325, MEEN 3305, MEEN 3345.

MEEN 4310. Mechanical Engineering Design I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Application of principles of mechanics and physical properties of materials, stress fundamentals and failure theories to the design, selection and analysis of linear elastic solid materials in machine elements with consideration of economics, safety and design for manufacturing. Prerequisite: MEEN 2310, CVEN 3423, ENGR 2324.

MEEN 4320. Mechanical Engineering Design II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Modeling, analysis and design of machine elements such as springs, bearings, gears, shafts, and mechanisms based on extensive application of physics, mathematics, core engineering principles and industrial practice; design for optimal manufacturability, quality and reliability in the mechanical engineering practice of design. Prerequisite: MEEN 4310, MEEN 3305 Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 4420. Thermal-Fluid System Design. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Application of thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid mechanics concepts to the analysis and design of thermal-fluid systems. Emphasis on component and system modeling, energy balances, performance measurements and experimental design. Prerequisite: ENGR 2322, MEEN 3305, MEEN 3345 Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 4425. Mechatronics. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

The study and design of electromechanical devices including comprehensive principles from mechanics, electronics, instrumentation and software; includes sensors, control systems and actuators along with how to choose a proper controller for mechanical engineering design problems. Prerequisites: ELEN 2425, MEEN 4310; ELEN/MEEN 4443 or concurrent registration Lab fee: $2.

MEEN 4443. Linear Control Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Application of state variable and frequency domain techniques to modeling and analysis of single input, single output linear control systems; physical implementation of control systems by integrating sensors, actuators and other control system components; use of software design tools. Prerequisite: ELEN 2425, ELEN 3320 or COSC 3344, MATH 3306. Lab fee: $2.

Dr. Mircea Agapie, Department Head
Department of Engineering and Computer Science
Hydrology and Engineering Building, Room 114
Box T-0390
Stephenville, Texas 76402
(254) 968-9863
(254) 968-9503
agapie@tarleton.edu
http://www.tarleton.edu/encs

Chair

  • Agapie, Mircea

Professors

  • Agapie, Mircea, Mircea
  • Martinez, Denise

Associate professor

  • Reese, Richard

Assistant professors

  • Abu Ghazaleh, Haitham
  • Albert, Lynal
  • Huang, Arthur
  • Lee, Hoe-Gil
  • Tronicek, Zdenek
  • Venjataranan, Kartik
  • Vuddandam, Rajesh
  • Wyers, Eric
  • Xu, Jun