Registrar

Privacy of Information/FERPA

Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, the following data are designated as directory information and may be made public unless the student desires to withhold it: student’s name, student type, mailing address, official email address, major field of study, military service status, classification, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, dates of University attendance, degrees and academic honors received, and the most recent previous education agency or institution attended. Any undergraduate or graduate student wishing to withhold all of this information should, within 10 days after the first class day, complete the appropriate form, available at the Registrar’s Office. For more information about FERPA, please visit www.tarleton.edu/registrar.

Student Classifications

In progress courses do not count toward a student's classification. Student classifications are only updated once a semester during the end of term processing.

Type Hours
Freshman less than 30 semester hours
Sophomore 30-59 semester hours
Junior 60-89 semester hours
Senior 90 or more semester hours
Post-baccalaureate Holds baccalaureate degree but is not admitted for graduate study
Graduate Holds baccalaureate degree and is pursuing a graduate degree

Student Course Load

Undergraduate**
Semester Credit Hours Fall/Spring Summer
Maximum Load 19 15
Full-time 12 7*
*

Students receiving financial aid/scholarship(s) should refer to the Financial Aid website for additional information regarding aid during the full-time summer term.

**

Enrollment status for the summer semester is determined by the total number of credit hours the student is registered for the entire summer term.

Special requests to take loads exceeding the stated maximums require approval of the appropriate academic dean. Requests to exceed by 3 or more hours require the additional approval of Academic Affairs.

Grading System

At mid-semester, preliminary grades will be assigned to freshman and sophomore students in 1000- and 2000-level courses and made available to the student. Final grades in all courses will be available on myGateway at the end of each semester.

The student’s term grade in any subject shall be designated as one of the following letters:

Grade Description
A Excellent, 4 grade points per semester hour
B Good, 3 grade points per semester hour
C Fair, 2 grade points per semester hour
D Passing; 1 grade point per semester hour
F Failing
F0 Failing, Non Attendance
FX Failing, Stopped Attending
I In-progress (used for non-completed thesis course work)
K Incomplete (under exceptional circumstances, see below)
Q Withdrawal from course, no grade designated
W Withdrawal from university, no grade designated
WF Withdrawal failing from university (included in GPA)
P(1) Pass
S(1) Satisfactory
U Unsatisfactory
NG No credit
1

 Signifies credit with neutral grade point value.

The lowest passing grade is D. Students should keep in mind the fact that some universities and colleges do not accept a D in transfer. A D is not considered passing for developmental courses.

In most instances, if a course is repeated at this institution, only the best grade in the course is counted in computing the GPA.

The grade K shall be recorded for a student only in case of extraordinary circumstances. This entry is used only in such cases after the instructor and his/her department head have concurred that the incomplete entry is justified. A grade of K must be made up by the last day course grades are due to the Registrar’s Office during the next long semester and in all cases before registering for the next sequential course. Should this grade not be reported to the Registrar’s Office within the prescribed time limit, it automatically becomes an F.

A student who drops a course on or before the census date receives no grade, and the course will not be listed on that student’s permanent record.

Audit Policy

A student may enroll to audit one or more courses under the following conditions:

  1. Application to audit a course must be made through the Registrar’s Office. Approval of audit requests is at the discretion of the Registrar’s Office and a record of audit enrollment is kept in the Registrar’s Office. The request form can be found at http://www.tarleton.edu/registrar/studentforms.html.
  2. Written consent from the instructor and department head is required prior to attendance in class.
  3. No audit enrollee is to be permitted to sit in class more than one period.
  4. Space and any required instructional equipment must be available. Evaluation of audit requests may be postponed until the end of registration if there are questions about availability.
  5. The extent of the student’s participation in the activities of the class is at the discretion of the instructor and is to be designated prior to enrollment.
  6. No student may audit a course offered on an individual instruction basis.
  7. To receive university credit from a previously audited class, the student must retake the class and pay the appropriate fees.
  8. An audit fee is required for each course at the time the request is submitted. In addition to the audit fee, audit students must pay any fee stipulated for the course. Fees associated with an audit request are not refunded unless Tarleton State University denies the audit request.
Concurrent Enrollment at Other Institutions

Students with individual hardship situations which may be improved by their having concurrent enrollment at another college or university may request permission for concurrent enrollment through regular academic channels (academic advisor, department head, and dean). If permission is granted, such credit hours earned may be applied toward degree requirements at Tarleton State University, however, courses completed without such approval generally may not apply toward degree requirements at Tarleton State University. Written permission from the student’s dean is required prior to concurrent enrollment in extension course work or in any resident courses from other institutions. Approval to take correspondence courses from other institutions must be granted by the Registrar’s Office, academic department head, and dean. Course load limits are not waived for students seeking concurrent enrollment.

Drop and Withdrawal Policies

Dropping Classes

A student desiring to drop a course should follow this procedure:

  1. Secure a Course Drop Request Form and instructions from www.tarleton.edu/registrar;
  2. Proceed to an academic advisor and obtain his/her signature;
  3. Return the Course Drop Request Form along with any other necessary approval as indicated on the form to the Registrar’s Office.

The effective date of dropping a course is the date the form is returned to the Registrar’s Office.

Note: The student should attend the class until this procedure is completed to avoid penalty for absences. Students will not be allowed to drop developmental courses, except for extraordinary situations. Students will not be allowed to drop: First Year Seminar (1100)ENGL 1301 Composition I ENGL 1302 Composition II; or  MATH 1314 College Algebra MATH 1332 Contemporary Mathematics I until after mid-semester, except with special permission (see www.tarleton.edu/registrar/specialpermissioncourses.html). The last day for dropping courses is identified in the University Calendar .

Withdrawal from The University

An application for withdrawal from the University must be initiated in the Office of the Registrar.

  1. Refer to the census chart below to determine the last day for dropping courses and the last day to withdraw from the University.
  2. A student who withdraws on or before the last day to drop courses will receive a grade of W in all courses.
  3. A student who withdraws after the last day to drop courses will receive a grade of WF in all courses. The student may appeal to the instructor of each class for a change of grade from WF to W if he/she was passing at the time of withdrawal.
  4. A student who fails to withdraw officially will receive a grade of F in all courses in progress.
  5. In circumstances where in-person withdrawal is not feasible, the student should call or write the Office of the Registrar and request an “Official Withdrawal Request Form.”
  6. In cases where the student is unable to contact the Registrar's office him/herself because of medical reasons or other emergency situations, a spouse or family member can contact the Registrar's office on behalf of the student to get instructions on what needs to be done in order to assist the student in withdrawing
  7. The refund policy established by the State of Texas is listed under “Refunds” in this catalog. All refunds are subject to this policy.
Census Chart
Length of Class in Weeks Official Census Date Last Date to Drop with a "Q" or Withdraw with a "W"
3 weeks Second class day Friday of second week
4 or 5 weeks Fourth class day Friday of third week
6, 7, or 8 weeks Sixth class day Friday of fifth week
9, 10, or 11 weeks Seventh class day Friday of sixth week
12, 13, or 14 weeks Ninth class day Friday of eighth week
15 weeks or more Twelfth class day Friday of tenth week
Limits on Dropped Courses

Under the requirements of Senate Bill 1231, 80th Legislature, an undergraduate student at Tarleton who enrolled in higher education for the first time in Fall 2007 and thereafter is permitted a total of 6 dropped courses, including any courses dropped at another Texas public institution of higher education. Specifics of the law are available in the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Regulations, Chapter 4, Section 4.10 (a). Requests for a drop to be considered an acceptable exception will be reviewed under the guidelines given in the regulations and coordinated through the Registrar. Note, if a student withdraws from the University, the courses enrolled in that semester do not count in the 6 drop limit.

A student who wishes to drop a course in excess of 6 should visit http://www.tarleton.edu/registrar/limitForDrops.html and contact the Registrar’s Office for appeal procedures. The student may wish to read the circumstances justifying an exception listed in the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Regulations before filing the request. Requests are not restricted to these categories but the student is asked to refer to a listed category if it is believed to apply. A student who is not satisfied with the decision of the Registrar may file a written request for an administrative review by the AVP for Enrollment Management. This administrative review will be limited to verification that the student has had the opportunity to present appropriate documentation and that the provided materials and statements were considered in making the decision.

An undergraduate student at Tarleton who first enrolled in higher education prior to Fall 2007 and who initially entered Tarleton for the first time in Fall 1998 or after is covered by a similar University rule which counts only drops at Tarleton toward the maximum of 6 and which includes withdrawals from the University in the count. Specific information is available in the catalog in force at the time of the student’s initial enrollment at Tarleton.

Fee Increases from Legislative Mandates

There are legislative mandates related to increased fees for repeating courses and excessive hours to achieve an undergraduate degree for students paying in-state tuition rates. The increase to in-state tuition rates for each of the three categories is $100 per credit hour. The first category applies to students repeating the same course for the third time or more since Fall 2002. The second category applies to students enrolled for the first time in Fall 1999 and thereafter who are paying in-state tuition rates, who accumulate excess hours beyond that required for an undergraduate degree. The fee increase starts at 45 hours beyond the undergraduate degree for students beginning in Fall 1999 or after but before Fall 2006 and starts at 30 hours beyond the undergraduate degree for students beginning in Fall 2006 and after. Students who have not selected a major are considered, by state law, to have a degree requirement of 120 hours. Details about each of these situations are available by visiting http://www.tarleton.edu/registrar/timelygraduation/index.html.

Any student who is being charged additional tuition rates under either category may file an appeal. The appeal is per semester so a student who wishes to appeal must file an appeal for every semester affected by the repeated course rule and/or the excess hours beyond a degree rule. The appeal form and procedures may be obtained by contacting the Registrar’s Office or by visiting http://www.tarleton.edu/registrar/timelygraduation/index.html.

New undergraduate students enrolling in an institution of higher education in Fall 1999 or afterward are subject to the conditions of Senate Bill 345 passed in the 76th Legislative session. The law states that a resident undergraduate student whose attempted hours exceeds, by at least 45 semester credit hours, the number of hours required for completion of the degree program may be charged tuition at a higher rate. The higher rate will not exceed the rate charged to non-resident undergraduate students. A resident student is one who pays the in-state rate for tuition purposes.

As of Fall 2006, new undergraduate students whose attempted hours exceeds, by at least 30 hours of the hours required for the completion of the degree program, may be charged tuition at a higher rate. Texas Education Code § 54.014 provides a limit on the number of hours an undergraduate Texas resident may attempt while paying in-state tuition rates. This Legislation impacts new undergraduate students enrolling in an institution of higher education in Fall 1999 or thereafter. Students who exceed the limit of attempted hours could be charged tuition not to exceed that of out-of-state tuition rates. Tarleton State University adopted a fee of $100 per credit hour for students who exceed attempted hours under the Undergraduate Funding Limit Rule.

New Undergraduate students who started Fall 1999 through Summer 2006 and attempt 45 or more semester credit hours beyond the hours required to complete their degree will be charged an additional $100 per credit hour for these excess hours.

New Undergraduate students who started Fall 2006 and thereafter and attempt 30 hours or more semester credit hours beyond the hours required to complete their degree will be charged an additional $100 per credit hour for these excess hours.

Students who have not selected a major are considered, by state law, to have a degree requirement of 120 hours.

Warning, Probation and Suspension

The following applies to all students unless more restrictive rules are included as part of special admission conditions or unless more restrictive rules have been approved for a program, department, or college.

The purpose of academic warning, probation and suspension is to make the student aware of the University’s concern that satisfactory progress is not being made in his or her course of study. Early notification of this concern maximizes the student’s opportunity to make appropriate adjustments that will result in remaining in good standing. A 2.0 total institution GPA is the lowest acceptable academic standard because this level mirrors the minimum GPA requirement for graduation. The total institution GPA used in this policy is defined as the best attempt on all courses taken at Tarleton State University; grades on transfer work are excluded. A student with a 2.0 or better total institution GPA is considered to be in good academic standing.

Warning: Each student is responsible for knowing his or her academic status and the regulations that apply. Students who do not abide by the regulations governing their particular status may be required to reduce their academic loads or withdraw from the University without special consideration.

Warning, Probation and Suspension Rules
  1. If a student’s total institution GPA drops below 1.00 at the end of any long semester (fall or spring), the student will be suspended.
  2. If a student who has been in good standing has a total institution GPA between 1.00 and 1.99 at the end of any long semester, the student will be placed on academic warning.
  3. A student who has been on academic warning during a long semester is subject to the following:
    1. At the end of the semester, if the total institution GPA is 2.00 or above, the student is returned to good standing.
    2. At the end of the semester, if the total institution GPA is between 1.00 and 1.99, the GPA for the semester will be used to determine the student’s status.
      1. If the GPA for the semester is less than 2.00, the student will be suspended.
      2. If the GPA for the semester is 2.00 or higher, the student will be placed on probation.
    3. At the end of the semester, if the total institution GPA is below 1.00, the student will be suspended.
  4.  A student on probation who has less than a 2.00 total institution GPA at the end of the next long semester will be suspended. A student on probation who has a 2.00 or better total institution GPA at the end of the next long semester will be removed from probation and returned to good standing.
  5. A student who transfers from Tarleton while on academic warning or probation and then returns (having met transfer requirements) has the same academic standing the first long semester back at Tarleton as though there had been no transfer.
  6. A student who is suspended from Tarleton and does not attend another institution during the term of the suspension or thereafter may return to Tarleton after the term of the suspension and will be on academic warning the first long semester back at Tarleton.  Any student who does not attend a fall or spring semester must reapply to the university.
  7. A student who is suspended from Tarleton and attends another institution during the term of suspension or thereafter must meet Tarleton's transfer admission requirements in order to be readmitted.  The student will be on academic warning the first long semester back at Tarleton.  Any student who does not attend a fall or spring semester must reapply to the university.
  8. Any student, whether in good standing, on academic warning, or on probation, will be suspended at the end of any long semester if his or her total institution GPA is below 1.00.

**NOTE: If a student is suspended from Tarleton State University, sits out a long semester (spring/fall), the student must reapply at www.applytexas.org to regain admission into the university.**

Length of Suspension

The first suspension is for one long semester. The second is for one calendar year, and the third is indefinite. Three calendar years after imposition of third suspension, the student may apply for readmission; this application will be evaluated by the appropriate dean, but readmission is not guaranteed. Students who have been absent for one or more long semesters must reapply to the university for admission.

Summer School

A student on academic warning or probation may attend summer school at Tarleton (transfer requirements having been met, if applicable).

Students placed on first suspension at the end of a spring semester may request their dean’s approval to attend summer school. A student attending summer school while on first suspension, who has a cumulative GPA of 2.00 at the end of the last summer session attended, will be returned to good standing.

Forgiveness Options

An undergraduate student enrolled at Tarleton may choose to exercise one, but not both, of the following forgiveness options:

OPTION I:  Grades for any one semester of Tarleton work taken more than 5 years before a student’s current enrollment at Tarleton may be deleted for computation of total institution GPA if the student files a request with the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. This option may be exercised one time only.

OPTION II: After a student has attempted ninety or more hours at Tarleton, grades for one semester of Tarleton work may be deleted for computation of total institution GPA if the student files a request with the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. This option may be exercised one time only.

When a student has exercised one of these forgiveness options, grades for the semester selected by the student will be excluded when computing the total institution grade point average. Under either option, all courses and grades will continue to appear on the student’s transcript and to be counted toward restrictions in total number of withdrawals, fees for repeated courses, fees resulting from excess hours beyond the degree, etc. In applying the option, all grades from the chosen semester are deleted from the GPA, not just low or failing grades. Also, no classes taken in the semester being forgiven will be counted on the student’s degree plan. A student seeking to exercise either option must be enrolled at Tarleton at the time he/she requests the forgiveness option.

Enrollment Verification

Enrollment Status Definitions

Please note the following information relative to enrollment verification:

  • Required credit hours to be certified as a full-time undergraduate, graduate or doctoral student for fall and spring semesters and for the summer terms:
Undergraduate:
Semester Credit Hours Fall/Spring Summer
Full-time 12 hours 7 hours
Graduate:
Semester Credit Hours Fall/Spring Summer
Full-time 9 hours 6 hours
Doctoral:
Semester Credit Hours Fall/Spring Summer
Full-time 6 hours 6 hours
  • Enrollment status for financial aid purposes may or may not match enrollment status as defined by the Office of the Registrar. For more information, please visit http://www.tarleton.edu/finaid/index.html.
  • Once a student drops a course, those hours cannot be used for verification of enrollment purposes. Information updates are supplied to the National Student Clearinghouse periodically, and a student's enrollment status may change if he/she drops a course or withdraws from the university.
  • To obtain proof of enrollment, visit http://www.tarleton.edu/registrar/enrollmentverifications.html.
  • A student who is enrolled in less than a full-time course of study at Tarleton State University may be in jeopardy of:
    • losing insurance coverage under his or her parent/guardian's insurance policy;
    • being placed on a loan repayment schedule by a lender or guarantor if the student is the recipient of Federal financial aid; and/or
    • losing a scholarship if the guidelines for receiving the scholarship require full-time enrollment, etc.
  • If a student is co-enrolled at another collegiate institution during the same semester he or she is enrolled at Tarleton State University, only the enrolled hours at Tarleton State University can be used for enrollment certification purposes. This excludes students who have signed and completed a financial aid consortium.

Requirements for a Baccalaureate Degree

General Requirements
  1. A GPA of 2.00 or better is required for all work counted toward a degree.
  2. A GPA of 2.00 or better is required for all work in the major field of study and counted toward a degree.
  3. All transfer students must have an overall GPA of 2.00 or better in all courses taken at Tarleton in their major field of study and counted toward a degree as well as an overall GPA of 2.00 or better in all courses taken at Tarleton and counted toward a degree.
Residence Requirements

Residence is satisfied only by official enrollment in and completion of course work applied toward the degree requirements.

  1. A minimum of 30 advanced semester hours of work counted toward the degree must be completed with Tarleton. The work completed at Tarleton and counted toward the degree must include 12 of these advanced hours in the major subject.
  2. A maximum of 68 semester hours of academic credit will be accepted for degree credit from a two-year institution.
Writing Proficiency Requirement

All students are required to satisfy the Writing Proficiency Requirement as a condition for the baccalaureate degree.  To satisfy this requirement, students must have credit for four writing intensive (WI) courses. Two of these four courses must be upper level WI courses within the major or designed for the degree plan. The remaining WI requirement should be met through successful completion of freshman composition courses within the general education curriculum.  For additional information regarding the WI program, please refer to:http://www.tarleton.edu/PROGRAMS/wip/index.html.

General Education Requirements

All degree programs leading to the baccalaureate degree include the following University General Education Requirements 1, 2:

American History6
United States History I
United States History II
Component Area Option and Communications9
Composition I
Composition II 3
Select one of the following:
Introduction to Speech Communication
Public Speaking
Business and Professional Speaking
Creative Arts3
Select one of the following:
Art Appreciation
Art History I
Art History II
Art History of America
Fine Arts Appreciation
The Art of Film
Fundamentals Of Music
Music Appreciation
Popular Music in America
Music Theory I
Jazz History
Introduction to Theater
History of the Theatre I
Dramatic Theory & Criticism
Government and Political Science6
Federal Government (Federal Constitution and Topics)
Texas Government (Texas Constitution and Topics)
Language, Philosophy and Culture3
Select one of the following:
The Short Story
Introduction to Literature
Literature and Film
Backgrounds of Western Literature
World Civilizations I
World Civilizations II
Introduction to Philosophy
Life and Physical Sciences (6 Hours + 2 Hours in Institutional Option) 48
Select from the following:
Biology for Science Majors
Biology for Science Majors II
Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomy & Physiology II
Essential Elements of Chemistry
Fundamentals of Chemistry
College Chemistry I
College Chemistry II
Earth Systems Science
Pre-GIS: GPS, VGI and Cartography
Physical Geology
Historical Geology
Introduction to Environmental Science
Natural Disasters
Essential Elements of Physics
College Physics I
College Physics II
Stars and Galaxies
Great Ideas of Physics
Introductory Astronomy I
University Physics I
University Physics II
Mathematics 33
Select one of the following:
College Algebra 3
Math for Business & Social Sciences I (Finite Mathematics)
Contemporary Mathematics I
Elementary Statistical Methods
Precalculus Math
Calculus I
Social & Behavioral Sciences3
Select one of the following:
Introductory Agricultural Economics
Introduction To Economics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Engineering Economy
Engineering Economy
World Regional Geography
Introduction to Human Geography
The Geography of Texas
Introduction to Logic
Ethics in the Professions
General Psychology
Introductory Sociology
Race and Ethnic Relations
Introduction to Archeology
Cultural Anthropology
Component Area Option1
First Year Seminar 4
Total Hours42
1

General Education Requirements are subject to review and change by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

2

Some degree programs specify the courses that satisfy these requirements. A student should consult with an academic advisor in selecting general education requirement courses.

3

 Students must enroll in these courses as outlined in the PLACEMENT, CONTINUING ENROLLMENT, AND COMPLETION RULES for Freshman-Level Mathematics and English Courses.

4

For additional information contact your departmental advisor or the advising center.

Graduation Under a Particular Catalog

To receive a degree from Tarleton State University, a student must complete all requirements for a degree as set forth in a particular University catalog within six (6) years of the date of the catalog selected. For example, a student who chooses to graduate under the requirements of the 2011-2012 catalog must complete all requirements for the degree under that catalog prior to August 2017 graduation. For students serving on active duty with the Armed Forces of the United States between the dates of their matriculation and graduation, the six-year limit will be extended one year for each year of active duty served, up to a maximum of four years. Subject to the six-year window, Tarleton students may choose the catalog in force:

  1. at the time the student first enrolls at Tarleton State University;
  2. for any subsequent year that the student is registered at Tarleton State University. Transfer students who pre-register for the first time in the spring for the following fall may choose to be under the catalog in force that spring; or
  3. at the time the student first enrolled in higher education.

Note: A student registering for the first time in the summer session may choose the catalog applying to the previous spring or the subsequent fall.

Degree Plan Information

Students are encouraged to file a degree plan before the junior year. Following initial enrollment at Tarleton, students with 75 or more hours attempted who do not have a degree plan on file may be barred from registration.

  1. MAJOR
    1. The major must be declared by the beginning of the junior year for advising purposes.
    2. A minimum of 24 semester hours is required for a major, of which at least 12 must be in advanced courses in the major subject.
    3. A double major requires that a degree plan be filed for each major.
  2. MINOR
    1. A minor consists of a minimum of 18 hours in a field other than the major, of which at least 6 hours must be advanced and completed at Tarleton State University.
    2. Declaration of a minor by the student is optional in most degree programs but strongly recommended. There are restrictions on minors for the interdisciplinary degree programs (BAAS, BSGS, BSAS, BAT, BAS). If a minor is desired, it must be declared on the degree plan. Students may declare no more than two minors.
    3. Lists of possible minors for baccalaureate degrees are in the UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC PROGRAMS section of the catalog.
  3. DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES needed as preparation for regular University requirements (READ 0303, ENGL 0303, and MATH 0303 and 0304) cannot be applied as degree plan contents.
     
  4. CREDIT HOUR REQUIREMENTS
    1. The minimum number of semester credit hours for a baccalaureate degree is 120.
    2. Unless recommended otherwise by the appropriate dean and approved by the provost, 45 hours of advanced (upper level) credit are required for all baccalaureate degrees.
  5. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS
    1. A student classified as a senior cannot take a freshman course that carries the same academic prefix description as the student’s first or second declared major field.
    2. A student may count toward the degree not more than 6 hours of activity KINE credits.

Class Rings

Students may order class rings during the semester following completion of 60 semester hours of degree credit. Students will receive notification by mail from Jostens Ring Company of their eligibility. Students may order their official Tarleton ring at Ring Days or may order online at www. jostens.com. Ring days are held throughout the year at the Tarleton Alumni Center and at the Thompson Student Center. Students will receive their rings at the Tarleton Alumni Association Official Ring Presentation Ceremony held in the Spring and Fall semesters.

Application for a Degree

  1. A candidate for a degree must apply for the degree by filing an “Application for Graduation” with the Registrar (undergraduate students) or the Graduate Office (graduate students) no later than specified in the University Calendar.
  2. To be considered for degree conferral, a candidate must be in good standing with the University. All contractual and financial obligations to the University must be satisfied.

Eligibility for Honors Graduation

To be eligible for honors graduation, a student must complete no fewer than 30 hours at Tarleton. The GPA is calculated on the total number of hours listed on a transcript (Overall GPA) and the total number of hours taken at Tarleton (Institutional GPA).  Students who qualify for Honors Graduation must have a 3.50 or greater for both the Overall GPA and the Total Institutional GPA.  Honors graduates will be recognized as follows based on the smaller of the two GPAs:

  • 3.90-4.00 GPA – Summa Cum Laude
  • 3.75-3.89 GPA – Magna Cum Laude
  • 3.50-3.74 GPA – Cum Laude

Students who are members in good standing of national honor societies that are recognized by Tarleton State University and that require a 3.2 cumulative GPA or higher for membership may have that membership identified on their transcripts.

Tuition Rebate

A $1,000 tuition rebate from the state of Texas is offered to qualifying students who graduate from Tarleton State University with a bachelor’s degree and no more than 3 hours over the minimum number of hours required for the degree. Beginning with students admitted the first time in Fall 2005, a student must also graduate in a timely manner to earn the tuition rebate. Detailed information regarding graduating in a timely manner and other requirements to qualify for tuition rebate can be found at www.collegefortexans.com. Students must apply for the tuition rebate prior to receiving their degree. This rebate program is effective for students who entered a bachelor’s degree program as freshmen during or after Fall 1997. Additional information is available from the Registrar’s Office.

Special Degree Programs

Accelerated Degree Programs

Tarleton State University offers an accelerated degree program, which is intended to allow a student who enters Tarleton as a freshman to complete a baccalaureate degree in three years. (Please note: To complete a degree in three years may require that a student attend summer school for at least one summer.) The three-year program is intended for students who enter Tarleton with strong academic preparation. To be eligible for the accelerated program, an entering freshman must:

  1. have graduated from an accredited high school with a ranking in the top quarter of the high school class;
  2. be exempt from TSI because of exam scores or have passed all parts of TSI with scores that would not require the student to enroll in any developmental courses at Tarleton; and
  3. score at least 1050 on the SAT or 23 on the ACT.

A currently-enrolled Tarleton student or a transfer student with less than 30 hours of transferable college credit is eligible to participate in the program if he/she meets the above requirements and has a college GPA of at least 3.0. A currently-enrolled Tarleton student or transfer student with more than 30 hours of college credit may participate in the program if he/she has a college GPA of at least 3.0.

A high school student who hopes to participate in Tarleton’s accelerated program may wish to get some college credits while still in high school, through dual enrollment, concurrent enrollment, or advanced placement. High school counselors can provide information about such programs.

Students admitted to the program should take no more than 19 hours in their first long semester at Tarleton; the number of hours may be higher for students with exemplary high school grades or SAT/ACT scores. Students who complete at least 15 hours with a GPA of at least 3.00 their first semester in the program will be authorized to enroll in up to 21 hours the following semester. A student maintaining a Tarleton GPA in excess of 3.25 may request authorization to enroll in more than 21 hours for a long semester.

At any time that a participant’s Tarleton GPA drops below 3.00 or he/she completes less than 15 hours in a long semester, the student will no longer be considered a part of the accelerated degree program.

Program participants must satisfy all requirements for their degree programs, including total semester credit hour requirements. They may request minor modification of some University general education requirements (i.e., a substitution of one course for another). Such a request should be directed to Academic Affairs. Students in the program may request departmental authorization to take courses out of sequence (without designated prerequisites) when necessary.

Participants will be advised in their academic departments and by a special designated academic counselor who will help participants plan their programs. The counselor will advise participants about methods of accelerating their degree programs (including CLEP tests, problems courses, correspondence courses, and departmental exams) and will also monitor the progress of students in the program.

Interdisciplinary Degree Programs

Tarleton State University offers the following degree programs that are interdisciplinary in nature: the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (BAAS), Bachelor of Applied Technology (BAT), Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS), and the Bachelor of Science in Applied Science (BSAS). The BAAS and BSAS allow the student to apply vocational or technical training to his/her degree program while the BAT/BAS typically requires the student to have completed an associate degree in an appropriate technical field. In all cases the student is encouraged to make contact with an academic advisor in the appropriate department who is familiar with the specific program requirements. Students in these degree programs must meet all Tarleton requirements that are established as conditions for baccalaureate degrees unless specific waivers have been approved. These include, but are not restricted to, general education requirements, residency, and upper-level hour requirements. Students in these degree programs may not get a minor in any support area required for the degree.

The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences Degree (BAAS)

The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (BAAS) is designed for the student with training in a technical area. This degree utilizes education received at technical schools, community colleges, military technical schools, etc. A student must have completed at least 12 semester credit hours (or equivalent) in technical training to be eligible for consideration. With appropriate documentation, the technical training may be supplemented with a maximum of 21 semester credit hours for work experience. A student must have at least 33 semester credit hours (or equivalent) in the combination of technical training and work experience to be eligible for consideration. In all cases, the technical training, work experience (if any), and proposed degree area must be directly related to each other.

The approved occupational areas for the BAAS degree are: Business, Criminal Justice Administration, Information Technology, and Manufacturing and Industrial Management. Tarleton does not guarantee the availability of all occupational areas. An occupational area is available only if an academic department related to the occupational area is currently sponsoring applicants.

A student interested in the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences should:

  1. review the admission requirements;
  2. contact the Office of the Registrar for a list of sponsoring departments; and
  3. meet with an academic advisor in the sponsoring department. The student will submit written records related to educational training and work experience (if any). The student is responsible for securing all related documentation.

The department will review the written records and decide whether to sponsor a degree plan application. Sponsored degree plan applications will be considered by the Interdisciplinary Degree Programs (IDP) Committee. Degree plan applications will not be considered until a student has completed at least 3 semester credit hours at Tarleton (or is currently enrolled in at least 3 hours at Tarleton). Degree plans approved by the Committee will be processed through regular University channels. Final approval will depend on completion of the University review process.

Quantitative Requirements for BAAS Degree Programs

  1. Occupational Specialization                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     The occupational specialization is a maximum of 33-36 semester credit hours (or equivalent) directly related to the degree area. These credit hours may consist of technical training and credit for work experience. Each of these has restrictions.
    1. The technical training must be such that it can be equated to vocational-technical schools. The IDP committee will rule on the admissibility of technical training.
    2. No student who has less than 12 semester credit hours of technical training will be considered for the program. The possible credit for technical training ranges from 12 semester credit hours up to and including all 36 hours of occupational specialization in the degree (33-36 semester credit hours).
    3. Credit for work experience is awarded only after the IDP Committee has reviewed the written documentation of the work experience and is limited to a maximum award of 4 semester credit hours per year of qualifying experience. The committee may award less than this maximum. A total of 21 semester credit hours is the greatest possible amount awarded for work experience.
    4. No student will be considered for the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences degree that has less than 33 semester credit hours in technical training or the combination of technical training and work experience.
    5. Sponsoring departments will require a minimum of 33 and a maximum of 36 semester credit hours of technical training or a combination of technical training and work experience, depending upon the respective program.
  2. Emphasis Area                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      (Minimum 24 semester credit hours, at least 12 to be upper level.) The emphasis area is to be related to and supportive of the occupational specialization. The advisor and the IDP committee will work together in selecting courses that meet the individual needs of each student.
The Bachelor of Science in Applied Science

The student pursuing the BSAS must complete the following, in addition to the University general education requirements:

Occupational Specialization
Technical Training12-36
Approved Electives0-24
Advanced hours in emphasis area 124
Advanced Electives12
CIS Electives (LL or UL)3
Electives3
Total Hours54-102

 Departments may determine courses

The Bachelor of Science in Applied Science is available in Business Administration. Note that work experience is not a part of this degree program. Students must work closely with the departmental advisor(s) responsible for this program.

The Bachelor of Applied Technology (BAT) and the Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS)

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Applied Technology or the Bachelor of Applied Science will have completed an appropriate associate degree at a community college before beginning one of these programs. There must be a close fit between the technical associate degree and the degree area, and students are encouraged to seek clarification before beginning the associate degree program to guarantee compatibility with approval criteria. For the Bachelor of Applied Technology the available emphasis area is Health Professions Technology, and for the Bachelor of Applied Science the available emphasis area is Veterinary Technology.

Other Academic Programs
Cooperative Education

Cooperative education in institutions of higher learning is an academic program that provides students with an opportunity to integrate formal academic work with planned and supervised experience in industry, government, or service agencies. Students are given an opportunity, through cooperative education, to earn a salary that may be used to finance their education. More importantly, the program allows student to participate in off-campus work experiences that are integrated with and that supplement their entire education and career goals.

Students may see their department heads for additional information about cooperative education.

Pre-Law Program

Admission to law school is based primarily upon a student’s performance on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and cumulative grade point average. Tarleton offers both a BA and a BS in Political Science with a concentration in Legal Studies, but a student may elect to take the LSAT and apply to law schools with any major offered at Tarleton. The LSAT covers three basic areas: logical reasoning, reading comprehension, and analytical reasoning. Students without foundations in these areas have little chance of competing successfully for admission to selective law schools.

BA in Political Science - Legal Studies Track
PHIL 2303Introduction to Logic3
ENGL 3309 [WI] Technical Writing and Document Design3
POLS 4301 [WI] Constitutional Law I3
POLS 4302 [WI] Constitutional Law II3
Advanced Political Science Electives6
Elections and Political Parties
The Executive
Legislation
The Judiciary
Political Theory Since 1789
Comparative Politics
Terrorism and Political Violence
Religion and Politics
Problems
Political Science Seminar
Elective Options (All hours must be advanced - Select from the following options. Lower level courses can be counted toward General Electives)15
Professional Development
Introduction to Speech Communication
Public Speaking
Interpersonal Communications
Ethics in the Professions
Internship
Policy Option
Social History of the United States Before 1865
Social HIstory of the United States Since 1865
Environmental Politics
International Environmental Issues
Foreign Policy
US Public Policy
Social Welfare in America
Service Learning
Social Welfare Policy
Criminal Justice Option
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Court Systems and Practices
Criminal Investigation
Fundamentals of Criminal Law
Comparative Criminal Justice
Criminal Evidence
Homeland Security
Criminal Justice Ethics
Criminology
Business Law Option
Introduction To Economics
International Economics
Business Law I
Business Law II
Employment Law
International Business Law
Introduction to International Business
Employee and Labor Relations
Business Ethics
Texas Real Estate Agency Law
Principles of Real Estate I
Principles of Real Estate II
Texas Real Estate Contracts
Real Estate Law
Electives (at least 3 hours must be advanced)13
Total Hours46
BS in Political Science - Legal Studies Track
PHIL 2303Introduction to Logic3
ENGL 3309 [WI] Technical Writing and Document Design3
POLS 4301 [WI] Constitutional Law I3
POLS 4302 [WI] Constitutional Law II3
Advanced Political Science Electives12
Elections and Political Parties
The Executive
Legislation
The Judiciary
Political Theory Since 1789
Comparative Politics
Religion and Politics
Political Science Seminar
Problems
Elective Options (All hours must be advanced - Select from the following options. Lower level courses can be counted toward General Electives)15
Professional Development
Introduction to Speech Communication
Public Speaking
Interpersonal Communications
Ethics in the Professions
Internship
Policy Option
Social History of the United States Before 1865
Social HIstory of the United States Since 1865
Environmental Politics
Foreign Policy
US Public Policy
Social Welfare in America
Service Learning
Social Welfare Policy
Criminal Justice Option
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Court Systems and Practices
Fundamentals of Criminal Law
Criminal Investigation
Comparative Criminal Justice
Criminal Evidence
Homeland Security
Criminal Justice Ethics
Criminology
Business Law Option
Introduction To Economics
International Economics
Business Law I
Business Law II
International Business Law
Introduction to International Business
Industrial Safety
Employee and Labor Relations
Business Ethics
Texas Real Estate Agency Law
Principles of Real Estate I
Principles of Real Estate II
Texas Real Estate Contracts
Real Estate Law
Electives (at least 3 hours must be advanced)9
Total Hours48

Students interested in preparing for the LSAT and law school are advised to consult the typical curriculum for their chosen degree and to consult the Department of Social Sciences, early in their undergraduate program.  For those not pursuing the BS or BA in Political Science (Legal Studies Track), there are course recommendations for a solid pre-law preparation. These courses focus on various areas of public policy, legal processes, philosophy and logic, and communications skills. Students who plan to apply to law school should enroll in as many of these courses as possible. Students are also encouraged to pursue a related minor, specifically one of interest that is related to the major areas of legal specializations – Criminal Justice, Business, Public Policy, Computer Information Systems, Biology (for biomedical focus), etc.  These minors along with a degree program will provide students with a range of opportunities in legal professions.

For more information on these opportunities and the many degree and minor options, contact the University Pre-Law advisor in the Department of Social Sciences: Dr. Benjamin Newton – (254) 968-9021.  

Pre-Theological Program

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree as preparation for entering a theological seminary will find that most programs for Master of Divinity and related degrees are based on the standards of the American Association of Theological Schools (AATS). These call for a heavy emphasis on the humanities, especially communication skills in written English and speech; basic knowledge of the past and present culture through history, sociology, philosophy, political science, literature, science, psychology, and related areas; and a foreign language. Of those languages offered at Tarleton, French or German is appropriate for those whose primary concern is scholarship; Spanish, for those planning a church ministry in the Southwest.

Some religious courses, such as those offered at religious centers at Tarleton, are valuable and usually taken by pre-ministerial students but the AATS discourages duplication of later work at the seminary. Although most seminaries accept candidates with a wide range of majors, the usual degrees for pre-seminary work are in such areas as English, communications, history, and sociology. Students planning to be candidates for seminary work need to check seminaries’ catalogs for special requirements.  Tarleton does offer a Pre-Ministry track with the BS degree in Sociology.  This track includes required courses in Religious Studies that compliment the degree as preparation for a seminary education.

For more information on this degree, on preparing for graduate studies in religion, or on preparing as an undergraduate for a seminary education, contact Dr. Eric Morrow in the Department of Social Sciences – morrow@tarleton.edu - (254) 968-9021.

Religion Studies

Religion Studies courses are offered on campus through the Department of Social Sciences.  The courses include Old and New Testament surveys, World Religions, Church History, Sociology of Religion, and Religion and Politics.  Some of these courses are a required component of the Pre-Ministry Track of the BS in Sociology.  For more information on these courses and related degrees and vocational opportunities, contact Dr. Eric Morrow in the Department of Social Sciences – morrow@tarleton.edu - (254) 968-9021.