Counseling

The Department of Counseling is one program on three campuses, we offer a Master of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling degree. The MS in Clinical Mental Health Counseling degree includes academic coursework that satisfies the academic course requirements for Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in Texas. Students with a teaching certificate and two year's teaching experience are able to exercise an option to take coursework to be eligible to take the TExES school certification test.

Mission Statement

The Department of Counseling seeks to prepare professional counselors who have developed sound counseling skills through a diversity of experiential learning; acquired a comprehensive theoretical knowledge base; and developed a strong professional counselor identity.  The Department’s intent is for graduates to be moral and ethical thinkers, scholars, and leaders who demonstrate civility and integrity, while contributing meaningfully and responsibly to the counseling profession.

Vision Statement

The Department of Counseling seeks local, state, regional, national, and international prominence as a collaborative and transformative community engaged in exemplary research, education, and service that benefit the profession of counseling and the public it serves.

Clinical Mental Health Counseling (CMHC) Curriculum Objectives

The CMHC curriculum is based on objectives that provide students with a structured sequence of curricular and clinical experiences reflecting the present and projected needs of a pluralistic society for which specialized counseling and human development activities have been developed.  The objectives are consistent with state licensing/certification and national certification educational requirements. The stated objectives are evidenced in course objectives and assignments embedded in Course Syllabi. These objectives reflect input from the Department faculty, Advisory Board, and former students of the Department.

The CMHC curriculum is organized around the following set of objectives:

1. Professional Identity:  Students will demonstrate an understanding of professional functioning including history, roles, technological competence, organizations, credentialing, advocacy process, and ethical standards in professional counseling.

2. Social and Cultural Diversity: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the cultural context of relationships, issues, and trends in a multicultural and diverse society as they relate to factors such as age, ethnicity, nationality, culture, gender, sexual orientation, physical characteristics, education, family values, spiritual values, socioeconomic status, and other unique characteristics.

3. Human Growth and Development:  Students will demonstrate an understanding of individuals at all developmental levels, including theories of development across the life span, theories of learning and personality development, human behavior including environmental factors effecting both normal and abnormal behavior, ethical and legal considerations, and strategies for facilitating development over the life span.

4. Career Development:  Students will demonstrate an understanding of career development and related life factors including  theories and developmental modes, career development program planning, educational and occupation information as well as computer-based career information systems, diversity issues in career development, career planning, placement and evaluation including assessment instruments, ethical and legal considerations, and career counseling techniques.

5. Helping Relationships:  Students will demonstrate an understanding of counseling and consultation processes including basic interviewing and counseling skills as well as knowledge and application of counseling theories. An understanding of family and other systems theories in family assessment and counseling is included.  Other helping considerations include knowledge of self, consultation and ethical and legal considerations.

6. Group Work:  Students will demonstrate an understanding of group development, dynamics, counseling theories, group counseling methods, and skills and other group work approaches.

7. Assessment:  The program will expect the student to demonstrate an understanding of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation.

8. Research and Program Evaluation:  Students will demonstrate an understanding of research, statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation.

Course Delivery

The Department of Counseling, one program delivered on three campuses. Students take courses with cohorts abiding by the published course rotation.  

  • Courses are delivered in Stephenville, Fort Worth, and Waco during the fall, spring and summer semesters.
  • Courses are primarily offered in the evenings with a limited number offered on-line/hybrid and/or weekends.

Course Rotations

Students are required take classes fall, spring, and summer. Students are required to follow published course rotations. Lastly, students are required to be advised by their Faculty Advisor each semester.

Registration After First Day of Class or Changing Classes

Under no circumstance will a student be allowed to register for a class or change a class after the first day of classes for the semester has occurred.

Semester Course Load

A full course load in the Department of Counseling is considered to be nine semester hours. A student must seek permission from Faculty Advisor and Department Head to take twelve hours. Under no circumstance will a semester load of more than twelve hours be considered or allowed.

Admissions

Applicants are accepted to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program in the fall semester. The application deadline is July 15th.

Applicants are permitted to enroll in six hours their first semester. 

Admissions Criteria

Admissions decisions are based on a holistic First Semester Review that includes the following indicators:

  1. Academic aptitude for master’s level study. Indicators:
    1. High grade point average in bachelor’s degree work.
    2. High grade point average in post-bachelor’s degree graduate work.
    3. Successful completion of, or progress in, TSU graduate courses in counseling.
    4. Commitment to and demonstration of graduate level writing proficiency and use of APA style.
  2. Interest in assuming an identity as a professional counselor. Indicators:
    1. An expressed preference for becoming a professional counselor.
    2. Knowledge of the counseling profession.
    3. Employment or volunteer experience in a counseling environment.
  3. Successful work experience or leadership activities. Indicators:
    1. One or more years of full-time work experience.
    2. Recognition as a successful employee, volunteer, or college student.
    3. Leadership experiences as an employee, volunteer, or college student.
  4. Interpersonal skills. Indicators:
    1. History of positive relationships with peers, professors, employers, friends, and family.
    2. Ability to handle stressful situations effectively.
    3. No evidence of unethical behavior.
    4. Openness to and willingness to act on feedback from faculty.
  5. Interest in a counseling area needed to balance the program or the profession. Indicators:
    1. Indication of interest in a needed emphasis area.
    2. Experience or background in a needed emphasis area.

As part of its commitment to the Tarleton State University policy of affirmative action, and to the professional ethics and values of the field of counseling, the Professional Counseling Program strives to seek a diverse student body.

Applicants with History of Felony or Misdemeanor Convictions

Applicants with any history of felony or misdemeanor convictions may be denied licensure. It is the student’s sole responsibility to check with the Texas LPC Board (http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/counselor/lpc_rules.shtm). The Department bears no responsibility in this matter.

Admissions Procedure (Two-Step Process)

Step 1: Apply to College of Graduate Studies

Admission to the College of Graduate Studies does not automatically admit a student to a graduate degree program.

All documents listed above are to be submitted to and processed by the College of Graduate Studies by:

  • Priority February 15
  • Final July 1st

Step 2: Apply to Department of Counseling - Clinical Mental Health  Counseling Program

  • Attend Admission Interview (Mandatory)
  • Attend Program Orientation (Mandatory)
  • During Orientation, learn how to enroll in CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353
  • During CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353, complete Application to the Department of Counseling and pay $30 application fee
  • Attend First Semester Review to learn admission status

Additional Information

Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA throughout the course of the program and receive a grade of “B” or better in ALL prerequisite CNSL courses. The following prerequisite courses are: CNSL 5311 Multicultural, CNSL 5354 Group, CNSL 5358 Diagnosis, CNSL 5357 Pre-Practicum, and CNSL 5397 Ethics.  A prerequisite course must be repeated the next semester the course is offered if the grade is below a “B.” The course in question may only be repeated once.

If applicants are not able to earn a “B” or better in CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353, they will not be admitted to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program.

Applicants will not be considered for admission to the Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program until CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353 have successfully been completed by earning a grade of “B” or better. Again, the courses may only be repeated once. No applicant will be permitted to enroll in additional coursework (CNSL) in the Department if not admitted.

Admission Interviews

The following discusses the Admission Interview process. Applicants must attend Admission Interviews and achieve a passing score in order to be invited to the Department’s mandatory Program Orientation.

1.      The Department must receive an acceptance notice for the applicant from COGS by July 1st for applicant to be scheduled for an interview.

2.      All applicants must have a GPA of 2.75.

3.      All applicants must attend and participate in the interview process.

4.      If an applicant passes the interview process, he or she will be invited to attend the mandatory Program Orientation.

Interview Process

The following outlines the interview process for the Department:

1.      Applicants meet with a faculty member for an interview.

2.      Applicants participate in a group exercise.

3.      An applicant must meet a minimum score to be considered for admission.

4.      All applicants are notified of status in the process within 48 business hours of interview day by email.

5.      If an applicant is denied to move further in the process, he or she may reapply the next semester the program accepts applicants.

First Semester Review

All applicants in CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353 must attend the First Semester Review to learn the status of admission. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss performance in terms of professionalism, competency with beginning counseling skills, professional responsibility, and integrity and ethical standards. Attendance at this meeting is mandatory in order to be considered for continued enrollment in courses in the Department.

Based on results of the First Semester Review, your admission status is as follows:

  • Fully Admitted,
  • Admitted with Conditions,
  • Not Admitted.

Fully Admitted: the applicant has full admission to the Department and a Degree Plan.

Admitted with Conditions: the applicant is NOT fully admitted. Faculty feel the applicant needs to meet certain conditions in order to be admitted. The applicant will not receive a Degree Plan until conditions have been satisfied. These conditions are considered on a case by cases basis. An applicant with the status of “admitted with conditions” receives a written, detailed remediation plan and due date. The applicant has ONE semester to satisfy conditions. If the applicant fails to satisfy the conditions, the admissions status will change to “not admitted.” In this case, the applicant is referred to the College of Graduate Studies and Career Services for assistance in finding a better career fit.

Not Admitted: the applicant is not admitted to the program/department and will not receive a Degree Plan. The applicant is referred to the College of Graduate Studies and Career Services for assistance in finding a better career fit.

Remediation can include: (not an exhaustive list)

  • Being encouraged to seek personal counseling at the applicant’s expense
  • Writing essays
  • Volunteer work
  • Attending a writing lab
  • Applicants will receive both verbal and written notification of status
  • Counseling 

Program Orientation

Applicants must attend the mandatory Program Orientation prior to enrolling in classes. Applicants receive enrollment instructions for CNSL 5353 and CNSL 5350 during orientation. If an applicant is unable to attend the Program Orientation, he or she must wait to seek admission until the next semester the Department admits applicants.

Transfer Hours

Students are permitted to transfer up to six hours of pre-approved CACREP coursework into the Department. Courses cannot be over six years old at time of graduation. The LPC board will not accept courses over ten years old. A student bears the responsibility to see his or her Faculty Advisor to determine if the course is acceptable. The student must submit a transcript and syllabus to the Faculty Advisor when making the request. The course(s) must be equivalent to the Department of Counseling CMHC program course. Faculty Advisors must submit the course substitution sheet to the department head for final approval.

Under no circumstance will CNSL 5353 or CNSL 5350, equivalents be permitted for transfer.

Professional School Counselor Option

Students utilizing this option must have a teaching certificate and two years of teaching experience on their official service record. If a student meets these criteria, he or she can make application to the Professional School Counselor Program during the first semester of course work. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the department’s School Counselor Coordinator to request the application. The Departmental office can give the student the School Counselor Coordinator’s contact information (254-968-1688). The cost of applying to the Professional School Counselor Program is $90 ($35 application fee and a $55 TEA Technology fee). The fees are automatically entered into the system by Tarleton’s Certification Office and will be added to the student’s Tarleton bill.

Once admitted into the Professional School Counselor Program, the student will be listed in the EPS database showing program admission. An email from TEA will be received informing the student of eligibility to test. TEA will ask the student to set up an account, if a TEA account already exists, the student should disregard this email. A student will NOT be able to test until the last semester of coursework. See the School Certification section of this handbook for more information.

Departmental Communication

Students Go.Tarleton.edu email account is the official email account for the university and the ONLY email account the department will utilize. Students must set up this account. Failure to do so will result in failing to receive imperative information from the university and the department.

The department utilizes a Listserv to communicate with students. This Listserv is sent to the Go.Tarleton.edu account only. Information shared ranges from deadlines to job opportunities.

Goodness of Fit

If a faculty member believes a student is not making satisfactory progress (academic or professional responsibility) in meeting departmental, professional, or university standards, that faculty member will review the situation with other faculty members. The faculty member may choose to refer the student for a Goodness of Fit Review meeting. This meeting will be comprised of a minimum of two core faculty members. The faculty will review the student's performance (academic or professional responsibility) during the meeting utilizing a Goodness of Fit Review Form.

Comprehensive Examination

Every candidate for the MS in Clinical Mental Health Counseling degree must apply for and pass a comprehensive examination. The comprehensive examination is taken in the first semester of clinical coursework (CNSL 5397). Students are responsible for checking the website (http://www.tarleton.edu/counsel/student-resources/cpce-exam.html) for registration deadlines, information regarding the examination and making arrangements to take it as scheduled. The cost is $85 which will be charged to the student’s Texan bill. The test is administered at the Stephenville location in the Testing Center. Students are required to show their Tarleton ID prior to being admitted to the Testing Center. If a student arrives late and/or without proper ID,  he or she will not be admitted into the testing center and will not be allowed to take the test.

Degree Requirements:

Master of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Required Courses
Core Requirements:
CNSL 5301Research Methods in Counseling3
CNSL 5304Human Growth and Development in Counseling3
CNSL 5311Multicultural Counseling3
CNSL 5313Crisis Interventions and Management for Counselors3
CNSL 5332Psychopharmacology3
CNSL 5350Foundations of Counseling 3
CNSL 5351Career Counseling 3
CNSL 5353Counseling Theories and Applications3
CNSL 5354Group Procedures for Counselors3
CNSL 5356Introduction to Family Counseling3
CNSL 5357Pre-Practicum3
CNSL 5358Diagnosis and Treatment Planning3
CNSL 5381Assessment in Counseling3
CNSL 5391Ethical Foundations of Counseling3
CNSL 5394Behavioral Addictions and Substance Abuse3
CNSL 5397Practicum3
CNSL 5399Internship3
CNSL 5399Internship3
Choose two of the following:6
Human Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction
Seminar in School Counseling
Evidence Based Counseling
Play Therapy
Behavior Management and Counseling
Counseling Children and Adolescents
Building, Marketing, and Managing a Private Practice
Expressive Arts in Counseling
Couples Counseling
Interpersonal Neurobiology for Counseling
Using Mindfulness in Counseling
Counseling Grief and Loss
Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Therapeutic Counseling
Total Hours60

Courses

CNSL 5086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

Open to graduate students in counseling who are independently capable of developing a problem in the area of counseling and guidance. Problems chosen by the student must be approved in advance by the instructor.

CNSL 5301. Research Methods in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course emphasizes research in the counseling field, basic statistics, literature review, proposal and report development, research implementation, needs assessment, program development, and ethical and legal considerations regarding research through the presentation of a formal research proposal and/or presentation of a completed research report. In addition the course explores the history and theory underlying program evaluation, approaches to evaluation, and techniques used for program evaluation, students consider the importance of scholarly writing and learn how to identify a topic for research and how to conduct a literature search. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5304. Human Growth and Development in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course introduces studies that provide an understanding of the nature and needs of persons at all developmental levels and in diverse cultural contexts. This course also provides a systematic study of human development emphasizing physical, personality, cognitive, moral and psychosocial developmental theories and issues, with an emphasis on facilitating optimal development and wellness over the lifespan. This course will attempt to merge theory into practice and integrate critical thinking concepts associated with developmental factors in human development. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5311. Multicultural Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is the study of interaction of social/cultural groups in America, problems of minorities and ethnic groups, problems related to gender and age, problems within family systems and contemporary sources of positive change. This course provides an understanding of how diverse values and mores, interaction patterns, social conditions, and trends related to cultural and ethnic diversity affect counseling. Emphasis is on developing knowledge, skills, and attitudes for more effective counseling with persons different from the counselor regarding characteristics such as culture, race, gender, sexual orientation, physical disability, and religious preference. Substantial attention is given to developing awareness of one’s own values, attitudes, and beliefs as they relate to counseling in a diverse society. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5313. Crisis Interventions and Management for Counselors. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an introduction to the research and practice of crisis counseling, trauma counseling and disaster mental health. Issues related to the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of clients affected by crises, trauma and disasters will be thoroughly addressed. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5350.

CNSL 5323. Ethical Consultation and Supervision in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will provide an introduction to counseling services in private practice, community centers and helping agencies, and schools and universities. Students will learn how to open a private practice, be consultants, clinical directors, and administrators. Overview of leadership theory and skills, consultation models and process, program evaluation, methods, and structure, and ethical, legal, and professional issues, the availability of funding sources and community resources. Students develop a personal model of consultation and apply their knowledge and skills to case studies and real-life examples. Prerequisites: CPSY 5350 and CPSY 5353.

CNSL 5324. Human Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a detailed examination of human sexuality, including reproductive physiology, sexual development across the lifespan, sexual behavior, sexual diversity, and the treatment of sexual dysfunction. The course includes a focus on the role of sexuality in relationships and in marital and family dynamics. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350, CNSL 5353, and CNSL 5356.

CNSL 5325. Building, Marketing, and Managing a Private Practice. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will learn how to build, market, and manage a thriving private practice. Students will understand how to design a business plan, finances, building quarterly market plans, client record keeping, and other important details of running a successful private practice. Prerequisite: CNSL 5304, CNSL 5311, CNSL 5350, CNSL 5351, CNSL 5353, and CNSL 5354.

CNSL 5326. Sandtray Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides advanced masters students with knowledge of appropriate uses of humanistic sandtray therapy with diverse populations. Students will learn how to use therapeutic interventions in the processing phase of sandtray that are designed to enhance client growth and awareness. Humanistic interventions and techniques will be demonstrated and practiced in class so that students may learn experientially how to utilize these interventions in sandtray therapy. Students also will engage in experiential activities designed to enhance their own growth and development. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350, CNSL 5353, CNSL 5357.

CNSL 5332. Psychopharmacology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The understanding of the basic neurobiology of psychopathology and how psychotropic medications treat such conditions is the foundation of this class. An emphasis is placed on the role of the counselor as a member of a treatment team who helps facilitate client treatment compliance and monitors the efficacy and side effect manifestations of psychotropic treatment, while helping to integrate that treatment with other non-pharmacological modalities. The course will include an overview of psychopharmacological medications, their basic classification, indications, contraindications, and side-effects will be provided. One goal of this course is to introduce the students to the basic terminology and models of pharmacokinetics as they relate to clinical mental health counseling and pharmacological treatment. A tertiary aim of the course will be to discuss the ethical role of the mental health counselor who is a part of the mental health care team in pharmacotherapy. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350, CNSL 5353, and CNSL 5358.

CNSL 5350. Foundations of Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines theories and concepts with emphasis on counseling skills, as well as historical, philosophical, ethical, legal, multicultural exploration and professional issues. The course provides an overview of counseling services commonly found in a variety of settings. It includes individual and group counseling, assessment, career planning, referral, and consultation. All students are required to take the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) and complete an essay based on the results. The essay will be reviewed during First Semester Review. The First Semester Review is a mandatory meeting students in their first semester of course work must attend to determine eligibility for admissions to the Counseling Program. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss performance in terms of professionalism, competency with beginning counseling skills, social and emotional maturity, and integrity and ethical standards. The course is taken concurrently with CNSL 5353 in the first semester of enrollment. For further details, reference the TSU Graduate Counseling Program Handbook. Prerequisite: Taken first semester concurrently with CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5351. Career Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an in-depth study of career counseling that focuses on occupational, educational, and personal/social issues for general and special populations. The course includes examination of theoretical bases for career counseling and a study of organization and delivery of information through individual and group activities. All ethically related concerns are addressed. Students will be required to purchase occupational and educational information materials. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5352. Seminar in School Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an in-depth study of a comprehensive school counseling and guidance program. The course will address the theoretical foundation, knowledge, and skills to prepare the student to implement a counseling and guidance program in an educational (K-12) setting. As the foundation course for those planning to enter school counseling, this course covers organization, planning, management, and evaluation of comprehensive school counseling programs; appropriate roles and functions of school counselors at various school levels, coordination of professional services; and professional issues such as ethics and associations as they specifically relate to school counseling. This course is required of all students seeking master’s degrees with the school counseling focus and of all students seeking school counselor certification in Texas. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5353. Counseling Theories and Applications. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course surveys and investigates counseling theories with an emphasis on how theories influence practice. There is a special emphasis is on applications to various population. The course includes role-plays and other experiential methods. Students will participate in recording a counseling session to be critiqued. All students attend mandatory personal counseling with a community counselor during the course. Related ethical and legal concerns are discussed.of enrollment. Prerequisite: Taken first semester concurrently with CNSL 5350.

CNSL 5354. Group Procedures for Counselors. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an introduction to group therapy and group procedures with an emphasis on developing group counseling skills to work with children, adolescents, adults, and special populations. The course covers various types of groups, an understanding of group dynamics and development, and related ethical and legal concerns. Students will participate in supervised group counseling experiences. Using relevant literature, multimedia resources, and a scholar-practitioner model, students develop an understanding of culturally and contextually relevant group practice, group leaders’ roles and responsibilities, the relevance and purpose of group work, and strategies for group utilization to foster social change. Students also participate in a group experience in their class. In addition, leadership styles, techniques, and roles are explored. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5356. Introduction to Family Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an overview of the theoretical concepts and intervention strategies unique to family, systems, and relational therapies. The course includes the study of family dynamics, family development, relationships, and the resolution of family concerns. Ethical and legal considerations are included. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5357. Pre-Practicum. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to introduce counseling students to basic interviewing and counseling, to include theories and skills. The students will demonstrate an understanding of ethical behavior. The course includes application of multicultural competencies to case conceptualization. The course includes self-care strategies for the counseling student. The course addresses professional issues relevant to the practice of Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350, CNSL 5351, CNSL 5353 and CNSL 5354 , CNSL 5381.

CNSL 5358. Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an overview of psychopathology that includes the history of abnormal behavior and an in-depth study of the specific diagnostic psychological disorders. Emphasis in the course will be on classification systems currently used in clinical settings and treatment alternatives from a counseling perspective. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5359. Evidence Based Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to provide students with both a knowledge/evidence base for the foundations of counseling and practical skills that will prepare them to see clients in their field work. Evidence is presented that the therapeutic alliance is, across all approaches to therapy, the strongest correlate of successful outcome. Students acquire skills in building a personal bond, providing deep empathy, promoting a collaborative atmosphere in therapy, and empowering clients to solve their own problems. Students are also encouraged to explore their own personal impact in developing a therapeutic alliance. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350, CNSL 5353, and CNSL 5358.

CNSL 5370. Expressive Arts in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to give counseling students an overview of expressive forms of counseling. Students will be able to gain further knowledge of creative approaches to counseling while also getting an opportunity to experience differing techniques. Additionally this course combines didactic and experiential learning. Discussion, role-play, lectures, small-group experiences, films, and demonstration are some possible methods that may be utilized. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350 & CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5371. Couples Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will provide students with knowledge and understanding of the principal theoretical frameworks, and the existing clinical approaches to counseling couples derived from the theoretical frameworks. The course will also expose students to a variety of clinical issues a counselor is most likely to encounter in clinical work with couples. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350 & CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5372. Interpersonal Neurobiology for Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides a comprehensive treatment of interpersonal neurobiology and its applications to clinical mental health counseling. The course will discuss neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, mental health disorders, and counseling methods from an interpersonal neurobiological perspective. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350 & CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5373. Using Mindfulness in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a detailed examination of mindfulness therapeutic techniques counselors use to help clients. Current trends in the counseling field will be examined and evidence-based research will be discussed throughout the course. Also, the course will cover different theoretical perspectives on mindfulness. The course includes a focus on the role of mindfulness helps clients and counselor achieve holistic wellness. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5374. Counseling Grief and Loss. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Designed to provide a foundation for counseling practice in the area of grief and loss. The practice of grief counseling is based on an in-depth understanding of the various theories and models associated with grief and loss and the applications of those models. Major and minor types of losses will be explored as well as differing reactions across developmental stages. Self-exploration of personal experiences, responses, and reactions to grief and loss will be examined. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350 & CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5375. Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Therapeutic Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a detailed examination of sexual orientation and gender expansion across the lifespan. Discussion of terminology and development unique to this population. Also, a focus on therapeutic techniques specific to this population will be looked at and practiced throughout the course. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350 & CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5376. Advanced Play Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The major focus of this course will involve experiential opportunities for the student counselor to develop play therapy skills that provide children with appropriate developmental materials and facilitate a safe relationship for the child to express feelings. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate developmentally appropriate activities for individual children and for small groups. In addition, students will gain exposure to multiple differing theoretical approaches and will learn the basics in application of those theories. This course will provide 67.5 additional education hours of the required 150 for students pursuing the Registered Play Therapist credential. Prerequisite: CNSL 5343 Play Therapy.

CNSL 5381. Assessment in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles, concepts, methods, and applications of assessing human experience and behavior for counseling purposes. Topics included for study in this course include the history and philosophy behind measurement and assessment in counseling, statistical concepts, and common assessment formats for measuring constructs such as personality, pathology, achievement and aptitude, and career interests. The required assignments focus on the themes of assessment critique, administration and interpretation of assessment results, and incorporating assessment results into work with clients and students. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5382. Behavior Management and Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an examination of the major approaches and techniques utilized in behavior counseling and behavior management, including the principles of applied behavioral analysis. The course explores formal treatment planning, application, and evaluation of counseling for the management of specific emotional an mental health disorders. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350, CNSL 5353, and CNSL 5358.

CNSL 5383. Counseling Veteran, Law Enforcement, and First Responders. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Description: This course is an overview of moral injury and the effects when working with veterans, law enforcement, and first responders. An overview of trauma informed guilt reduction therapy in relationship to developing a working knowledge of military and first responder culture and how to integrate trauma informed guilt reduction therapy to address trauma within this closed culture. Prerequisite: CNSL 5358.

CNSL 5390. Selected Topics in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of different topics each semester with a focus on contemporary issues in counseling. This course may be repeated for credit as the topic changes.

CNSL 5391. Ethical Foundations of Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an exploration of the ethical principles of counselors and related codes of ethics. The course covers models or ethical decision-making and how to apply to counseling practice. Students will learn about the importance of self-care and application. The course explores the importance of multicultural considerations and implications for social justice. Students will learn ethical obligations to advocate for clients. The course covers ethical standards of professional organizations and credentialing bodies. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5392. Counseling Children and Adolescents. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is intended to provide a comprehensive study of therapeutic approaches and techniques for children and adolescents and is designed to develop students’ knowledge and skills in the theory and practice of working with children. It prepares counselors to address the specific needs of children and adolescents, with emphasis on developmental needs, specific therapeutic interventions, and common emotional issues. Group and individual counseling techniques and treatment planning are included. Contemporary issues and interventions addressed include: typical developmental problems, creative interventions, crisis management, exceptional children, parenting skills, multicultural considerations, and ethical concerns. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350, CNSL 5353, and CNSL 5393.

CNSL 5393. Play Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides an overview of the essential elements and principles of play therapy, including history, theories, modalities, techniques, applications, and skills. Further, an experiential component focuses on basic play therapy skill development within the context of ethical and diversity-sensitive practice. The course meets Association for Play Therapy requirements providing 67.5 Continuing Education (CE) hours towards the mandatory 150 required for RPT certification. Prerequisites: CNSL 5350, CNSL 5353, and CNSL 5358.

CNSL 5394. Behavioral Addictions and Substance Abuse. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is intended to provide students with information regarding behavioral addictions (gambling, sex, Internet, video gaming, etc.), substance abuse, and co-occurring disorders. Information regarding the etiology, recognition, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and impact of addictions will be addressed. The influence of addictions throughout the lifespan will also be examined. An experiential component is included as well. Ethical and legal concerns are covered. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350 and CNSL 5353.

CNSL 5395. Internship in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Supervised professional activities in guidance and counseling. Major emphasis is placed on the student's involvement in successful practices at the educational level of interest. Students must have met all academic and professional standards of practice before placement. The field experience will consist of a minimum of 150 clock hours. Liability insurance is required. An application must be submitted by the published due date in the semester prior to field placement and approved by the practicum/internship director. Prerequisites: 3.0 or greater GPA and CPSY 5357, or approval of the department head. Field experience fee $75.

CNSL 5396. Internship in Counseling II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Supervised professional activities in counseling at a field placement. Students must have met all academic and professional standards of practice before placement. The field experience will consist of a minimum of 160 clock hours. Liability insurance is required. A complete application must be submitted by the published due date in the semester prior to field placement and approved by the director. This course is repeatable up to two times for a maximum number of 6 credit hours. Prerequisites: CNSL 5395 and approval of program director.

CNSL 5397. Practicum. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides an overview of the basic counseling skills used by the professional counselor in working with children, adolescents, and adults. The course includes a laboratory experience in which the student is trained in the application of counseling relationship-building and working-stage skills via role-play activities with other students in the class and field placements as available. Integration of theory and practice is imperative in counselor training. This course is repeatable up to two times but a maximum number of 3 credit hours will be awarded. This course will be graded using a pass/fail grading system. Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA or greater and CNSL 5357, CNSL 5358, CNSL 5311, and one elective from CNSL 5382, CNSL 5324, CNSL 5359, CNSL 5393, or CNSL 5392.

CNSL 5399. Internship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Primary interest is on integration of process, conceptual, professional, and personal skills. Provides extensive supervised experience in a setting closely aligned with student's chosen program. Taken as a two-semester sequence of two, three credit-hour courses. Each semester requires twenty weekly hours (300 total in each) of field experience. This course is repeatable up to four times, but a maximum of 6 credit hours will be awarded. This course will be graded using a pass/fail grading system. Prerequisite: CNSL 5350, CNSL 5351, CNSL 5353, CNSL 5354, CNSL 5381, grade of "B" or better in CNSL 5357 and CNSL 5397 and departmental permission received via application acceptance.

CNSL 6086. Problems Course. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-6 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Open to doctoral students in counseling who are independently capable of developing a problem in the area of counseling. Problems chosen by the student must be approved in advance by the instructor. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6090. Special Topics. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-6 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Special Topics in Counseling. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6179. Doctoral Internship I - Supervision. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students are required to complete doctoral-level counseling internships that total a minimum of 600 clock hours. The 600 hours must include supervised experiences in at least three of the five doctoral core areas (counseling, teaching, supervision, research and scholarship, leadership and advocacy). The 600 credit hours may be allocated at the discretion of the doctoral advisor of the doctoral advisor and the student on the basis of experience and training. Internship is designed to provide individual students with a planned program of advanced doctoral level professional experience in a college or community/agency setting. Internship assignments will be controlled and coordinated by a university instructor. An experienced professional at the internship site provides direct supervision. The doctoral-level internship will consist of providing individual and group supervision to master's level students, teaching and/or co-teaching master's level counseling courses, and participating in professional activities related to counselor education. If doctoral students have had limited clinical counseling experiences prior to beginning their doctoral work, they may also be required to complete credit hours in a counseling setting to gain more counseling experience. Prerequisite: CNSL 6302.

CNSL 6180. Doctoral Internship II Teaching. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students are required to complete doctoral-level counseling internships that total a minimum of 600 clock hours. The 600 hours must include supervised experiences in at least three of the five doctoral core areas (counseling, teaching, supervision, research and scholarship, leadership and advocacy). The 600 credit hours may be allocated at the discretion of the doctoral advisor and the student on the basis of experience and training. Internship is designed to provide individual students with a planned program of advanced doctoral level professional experience in a college or community/agency setting. Internship assignments will be controlled and coordinated by a university instructor. An experienced professional at the internship site provides direct supervision. The doctoral-level internship will consist of student's engaging in teaching activities, which include but are not limited to teaching master's level students on-campus/online. If doctoral students have been limited clinical counseling experiences prior to beginning their doctoral work, they may also be required to complete credit hours in a counseling setting to gain more counseling experience. Prerequisites: CNSL 6302 and CNSL 6179.

CNSL 6181. Doctoral Internship III - Supervision. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students are required to complete doctoral-level counseling internships that total a minimum of 600 clock hours. The 600 hours must include supervised experiences in at least three of the five doctoral core areas (counseling, teaching, supervision, research and scholarship, leadership and advocacy). The 600 credit hours may be allocated at the discretion of the doctoral advisor and the student on the basis of experience and training. Internship is designed to provide individual students with a planned program of advanced doctoral level professional experience in a college or community/agency setting. Internship assignments will be controlled and coordinated by a university instructor. An experienced professional at the internship site provides direct supervision. The doctoral-level internship will consist of providing individual and group supervision to master's level students, teaching and/or co-teaching master's level counseling courses, and participating in professional activities related to counselor education. If doctoral students have had limited clinical counseling experiences prior to beginning their doctoral work, they may also be required to complete credit hours in a counseling setting to gain more counseling experience. Prerequisite: CNSL 6180.

CNSL 6182. Doctoral Internship IV – Research and Scholarship. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students are required to complete doctoral-level counseling internships that total a minimum of 600 clock hours. The 600 hours must include supervised experiences in at least three of the five doctoral core areas (counseling, teaching, supervision, research and scholarships, leadership and advocacy). The 600 credit hours may be allocated at the discretion of the doctoral advisor and the student on the basis of experience and training. Internship is designed to provide individual students with a planned program of advanced doctoral level professional experience in a college or community/agency setting. Internship assignments will be controlled and coordinated by a university instructor. An experienced professional at the internship site provides direct supervision. The doctoral-level internship will consist of student's choosing from one of three doctoral core areas to complete internship hours. These include counseling, research and scholarship, leadership and advocacy. If doctoral students have had limited clinical counseling experiences prior to beginning their doctoral work, they must also be required to complete credit hours in a counseling setting to gain more counseling experience. Prerequisite: CNSL 6181.

CNSL 6183. Doctoral Internship V - Teaching. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students are required to complete doctoral-level counseling internships that total a minimum of 600 clock hours. The 600 hours must include supervised experience in at least three of the five doctoral core areas (counseling, teaching, supervision, research and scholarship, leadership and advocacy). The 600 credit hours may be allocated at the discretion of the doctoral advisor and the student on the basis of experience and training. Internship is designed program of advanced doctoral level professional experience in a college or community/agency setting. Internship assignments will be controlled and coordinated by a university instructor. An experienced professional at the internship site provides direct supervision. The doctoral-level internship will consist of student's engaging in teaching activities, which include but are not limited to teaching master's level students on-campus/online. If doctoral students have had limited clinical counseling experiences prior to beginning their doctoral work, they may also be required to complete credit hours in a counseling setting to gain more counseling experience. Prerequisite: CNSL 6182.

CNSL 6184. Doctoral Internship VI - Supervision. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students are required to complete doctoral-level counseling internships that total a minimum of 600 clock hours. The 600 hours must include supervised experience in at least three of the five doctoral core areas (counseling, teaching, supervision, research and scholarship and advocacy). The 600 credit hours may be allocated at the discretion of the doctoral advisor and the student on the basis of experience and training. Internship is designated to provide individual students with a planned program of advanced doctoral level professional experience in a college or community/agency setting. Internship assignments will be controlled and coordinated by a university instructor. An experienced professional at the internship site provides direct supervision. The doctoral-level internship will consist of providing individual and group supervision to master's level students, teaching and/or co-teaching master's level counseling courses, and participating in professional activates related to counselor education. If doctoral students have had limited clinical counseling experiences prior to beginning their doctoral work, they may also be required to complete credit hours in a counseling setting to gain more counseling experience. Prerequisite: CNSL 6184.

CNSL 6300. Advanced Theories of Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines several major counseling theories that inform current counseling practice. Students will have an opportunity to compare, analyze, and evaluate the compatibility and effectiveness of counseling theories in practice, including evidence-based practices, and ethical and culturally relevant practice in multiple clinical settings. Students will demonstrate knowledge and application of major theories pertaining to the principles and practices of counseling to include the conceptualization of clients from multiple theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6302. Theory and Process of Counselor Supervision. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Clinical supervision of counselors and counselors in training requires in-depth knowledge of major conceptual approaches, methods, and techniques; evaluation; and ethical and legal issues related to supervisory interactions and responsibilities. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop their professional identity and learn the skills of a clinical supervisor. Throughout this course, students engage in experiential applications, discussions, and self-reflective assignments that focus on the strategies for working with supervisees representing diverse backgrounds and developmental and learning styles. After a critical analysis of the purpose of supervision, theoretical frameworks, and models of supervision, students develop and apply their own theory of supervision in a practice setting in which they each oversee a group of practicum students. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6304. Leadership and Advocacy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Counselor educators have a responsibility to provide leadership and advocacy. Students have the opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of this responsibility as well as the prospect of enhancing their professional development plans by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service, including advocacy for their own community, clients, students, or profession. Students examine the processes of advocacy. They use contemporary research to analyze the current trends and issues of the profession. Students also identify how community, national, and international issues affect the counseling profession. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6305. Instructional Theory in Counselor Education. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course prepares students to become competent teachers of counselor education through the examination of various adult learning methods to work effectively with different learning styles, cultural dynamics, and diversity. Topics covered are learning theories, retention of material, motivation, classroom instructional strategies and techniques, and assessment of learning from the core learning expectations. This course will provide an overview of the history and development of counselor education with an examination of the theoretical orientation and practice skills necessary to function effectively as a counselor educator. Students will examine their personal philosophy of teaching and learning and demonstrate the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate methods appropriate to course objectives. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6308. Program Evaluation and Grant Writing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course focuses on the concepts and processes related to program evaluation and the steps in performing a program evaluation. Emphasis is on the application and demonstration of critical thinking skills related to analyzing and evaluating an array of programs. Students will also demonstrate the ability to write grant proposals appropriate for research, program enhancement, and/or program development. Students will engage in grant writing activities appropriate to their site and counseling goals. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6309. Seminar in Rural Mental Health. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This is a specialized online course designed to address the unique needs of counseling rural communities and populations. Attention will be given to the uniqueness of rural counseling and communities, ethical considerations, working with existing educational and community entities, multicultural issues and challenges, and the various roles of the rural community counselor. This course will provide a special focus on the impact of substance abuse, addictions, and telehealth. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6391. Advanced Practicum in Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This advanced supervised practicum in counseling will enable doctoral-level students to develop and/or refine advanced counseling skills and conceptually link counselor practice and supervision. The doctoral practicum focuses on additional supervised clinical counseling experience beyond the supervised experience completed in the student's master's degree program. Students are required to participate in a supervised doctoral-level practicum of a minimum of 100 hours in counseling, of which 40 hours must be in direct service with clients. The nature of the doctoral-level practicum experience is to be determined in consultation with program faculty and/or a doctoral committee. Students will participate in weekly group supervision with a faculty member and other practicum students. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6397. Quantitative Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines advanced quantitative research models and methods of instrument design such as experimental and quasi-experimental designs to include application of advanced quantitative research skills, evaluation of research proposals from human subjects/institutional review board reviews, application of professional writing for journal and newsletter publication, and appropriate conference proposal procedures. Students will demonstrate knowledge through application of quantitative research questions appropriate for professional research and be introduced to writing for publication. This course will also address ethical and diversity issues involved in research design, measurement, implementation, and generalization of findings. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6398. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines qualitative research design and the development of advanced level qualitative research skills. Explores and contrasts philosophical assumptions of qualitative and quantitative research. Areas of emphasis include methodologies, such as grounded theory, ethnographic, and phenomenological and other emergent research practice and processes. Students will develop competencies in qualitative data collection, analysis, and oral and written data presentation. Various methodologies and approaches to qualitative research are reviewed. Prerequisite: Admission to the PhD in Counseling.

CNSL 6399. Research & Publication. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines advanced topics and controversies in qualitative and quantitative counseling research; this integration of theoretical with applied counseling material augments the department's standard doctoral research offerings. Students will engage in qualitative and quantitative research methods and complete a journal manuscript and conference proposal. Prerequisites: CNSL 6301 and CNSL 6398.

CNSL 7192. Dissertation Continuation. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a Counseling doctoral degree requirement for students who have not successfully defended their dissertation after completing CNSL 6319 - Dissertation IV. This course allows students to continue and complete dissertations with the assistance of the dissertation committee. Prerequisites: CNSL 7388 minimum grade of B and CNSL 7389 minimum grade of a B and CNSL 7390 minimum grade of a B and CNSL 7391 minimum grade of a B.

CNSL 7388. Dissertation I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

This course is a Counseling doctoral degree requirement focused on preparing students to inform professional practice by generating new knowledge for the counseling profession through dissertation research or a comparable research project focusing on areas relevant to counseling practice, counselor education, and/or supervision. Further, the course requires students to work individually with their doctoral committee to determine the specific requirements for completing dissertation research or comparable research project including a dissertation/project proposal and defense. Students may register for this course after successfully completing oral and written comprehensive exams and with the permission of their dissertation committee. The student's doctoral dissertation/project committee chair (or intended doctoral dissertation/project committee chair) will oversee the work of the student. Prerequisites: CNSL 6302 and CNSL 6184.

CNSL 7389. Dissertation II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a Counseling doctoral degree requirement focused on preparing students to inform professional practice by generating new knowledge for the counseling profession through dissertation research or a comparable project focusing on areas relevant to counseling practice, counselor education, and/or supervision. Further, the course requires students to work individually with their doctoral committee to determine the specific requirements for completing dissertation research or comparable research project including a dissertation/project proposal and defense. Students may register for this course after successfully completing oral and written comprehensive exams and with the permission of their dissertation committee. The student's doctoral dissertation/project committee chair (or intended doctoral dissertation/project committee chair) will oversee the work of the student. The student in collaboration with the supervising faculty member will develop a concrete plan of work related to the student's intended dissertation/research project. Prerequisite: CNSL 7388 minimum grade of B.

CNSL 7390. Dissertation III. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a Counseling doctoral degree requirement focused on preparing students to inform professional practice by generating new knowledge for the counseling profession through dissertation research or a comparable research project focusing on areas relevant to counseling practice, counselor education, and/or supervision. Further, the course requires students to work individually with their doctoral committee to determine the specific requirements for completing dissertation research or comparable research project including a dissertation/project proposal and defense. Students may register for this course after successfully completing oral and written comprehensive exams and with the permission of their dissertation committee. The student’s doctoral dissertation/project committee chair (or intended doctoral dissertation/project committee chair) will oversee the work of the student. The student in collaboration with the supervising faculty member will develop a concrete plan of work related to the student’s intended dissertation/research project. Prerequisite: CNSL 7388 minimum grade of a B.

CNSL 7391. Dissertation IV. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a Counseling doctoral degree requirement focused on preparing students to inform professional practice by generating new knowledge for the counseling profession through dissertation research or a comparable research project focusing on areas relevant to counseling practice, counselor education, and/or supervision. Further, the course requires students to work individually with their doctoral committee to determine the specific requirements for completing dissertation research or comparable research project including a dissertation/project proposal and defense. Students may register for this course after successfully completing oral and written comprehensive exams and with the permission of their dissertation committee. The student’s doctoral dissertation/project committee chair (or intended doctoral dissertation/project committee chair) will oversee the work of the student. The student in collaboration with the supervising faculty member will develop a concrete plan of work related to the student’s intended dissertation/research project. Prerequisite: CNSL 7390 minimum grade of a B.

Dr. Beck A. Munsey Ph.D., NCC, LPC-S
Department of Counseling
Box T 0765
Stephenville, TX 76402
682-703-7993
munsey@tarleton.edu
www.tarleton.edu/counsel/

Chair

  • Munsey, Beck

Associate professors

  • Blanco, Pedro
  • Munsey, Beck Dr.
  • Foster, Ryan

Assistant professors

  • Hurless, Nikki Dr.
  • Wilder, Chris
  • Manning, LaShondra
  • Holliman, Ryan