Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Public Health, and Nutrition Science

The Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Public Health, and Nutrition Science offers several options of associate, bachelors, and masters degrees for professional laboratory education, a Bachelor of Science in Public Health, and a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science. All laboratory programs require a program specific application located on the departmental website. The Public Health, Nutrition Science, and Health Profession Technology options are not competitive admission programs.

Degree and certificate options include the following:

  • AAS and/or Certificate in Medical Laboratory Technology (Fort Worth campus)
  • AAS and/or certificate in Histotechnology (Fort Worth campus)
  • BAT in Health Professions Technology (On-Line)
  • BS and/or Certificate in Medical Laboratory Science (Fort Worth campus)
  • BS in Nutrition Science (Stephenville campus)
  • BS in Public Health (Stephenville campus)
  • MS in Medical Laboratory Sciences (Fort Worth campus)

Bachelor of Science Degree in Medical Laboratory Science - Description

The last sixteen months of the Medical Laboratory Science degree/certificate program is completed at the Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Public Health, & Nutrition Science located in Fort Worth, Texas.  The Department consists of a teaching center and numerous clinical affiliates located in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex and surrounding areas. The teaching center is housed in the Schaffer Building in Fort Worth, which consists of a lecture room, six laboratories, a computer lab, and a library. The MLS program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Medical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS) 5600 N. River Road, Suite 720, Rosemont, IL 60018. A continuous 16-month professional laboratory curriculum is offered, totaling 54 semester hours, with 10 months in the teaching center and 6 months in the clinical affiliate.

A maximum of thirty-five students are admitted to the MLS program in the Spring and Fall semesters of each year, with application deadlines of the preceding September 1 and May 1, respectively. Admission is on a competitive basis. An overall minimum GPA of 2.5/4.00, with a minimum GPA of 2.8 in science and math, is required. NAACLS specifies that prerequisite college courses and numbers of credits required shall be those necessary to ensure admission of individuals prepared for the educational program. Prerequisite content area includes general chemistry, organic and/or biochemistry, general biological sciences, microbiology, and mathematics. Survey courses do not qualify as fulfillment of chemistry and biological science prerequisites. Developmental mathematics courses will not satisfy the mathematics requirements.

Students entering the program from other universities must fulfill the degree requirements of their institution, and that institution must provide a degree statement of the 54 hours awarded by Tarleton State University for graduation requirements. By special arrangement prior to entrance, students may elect to receive the degree from their original university or from Tarleton State University. Students who have already obtained a baccalaureate degree may also enter the program, provided they have met the program's minimum prerequisite requirements. Students articulating from affiliated Universities and post-baccalaureate students may elect to pursue a combined BS/MS MLS concentration. For additional information please see the Master of Science in Medical Laboratory Science catalog page. 

Successful completion of courses will be determined with the maintenance of a grade of C or better in lecture, laboratory and practicum courses. All students are admitted on a probationary status and progressive academic achievement must be maintained.

Upon successful completion of the MLS program, the Bachelor of Science degree may also be awarded. The graduated student is eligible to sit for the Medical Laboratory Science Certification examination offered by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

For further information concerning the Medical Laboratory Science program, contact:

Myoung Ryou Ph.D., MS, MLS
Associate Professor and MLS Program Director
1501 Enderly Place
Fort Worth, TX 76104
(817) 926-1101
ryou@tarleton.edu

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Medical Laboratory Science

Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
BIOL 1406Biology for Science Majors4
BIOL 2300Cell Biology3
BIOL 3407Microbiology4
BIOL 3485Immunology4
BIOL 4460Animal Physiology4
CHEM 1311
CHEM 1111 [shared]
College Chemistry I (Lecture)
and College Chemistry I (Laboratory)
CHEM 1312
CHEM 1112 [shared]
College Chemistry II (Lecture)
and College Chemistry II (Laboratory)
CHEM 2323
CHEM 2123
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CHEM 2325
CHEM 2125
Organic Chemistry II
and Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
4
MATH 1314 [shared] College Algebra
MATH Elective3
MDLS 4274Introduction to Lab Safety and Operations2
MDLS 4148 [WI] Introduction to Medical Genetics1
MDLS 4276Clinical Chemistry I Lecture2
MDLS 4177Clinical Chemistry I Lab1
MDLS 4334Medical Microbiology I Lecture3
MDLS 4135Medical Microbiology I Lab1
MDLS 4364Immunology and Serology Lecture3
MDLS 4169Immunology and Serology Lab1
MDLS 4324Hematology I Lecture3
MDLS 4125Hematology I Laboratory1
MDLS 4214Urinalysis and Body Fluids Lecture 2
MDLS 4115Urinalysis and Body Fluids Laboratory1
MDLS 4226Hematology II Lecture2
MDLS 4127Hematology II Laboratory1
MDLS 4336Medical Microbiology II Lecture3
MDLS 4137Medical Microbiology II Lab1
MDLS 4378Clinical Chemistry II Lecture3
MDLS 4179Clinical Chemistry II Lab1
MDLS 4175Advanced Laboratory Automation, Statistics, and Quality Assurance Concepts1
MDLS 4444Immunohematology Lecture4
MDLS 4149Immunohematology Lab1
MDLS 4592Clinical Laboratory Practicum I2
MDLS 4593Clinical Laboratory Practicum II2
MDLS 4594Clinical Laboratory Practicum III2
MDLS 4595Clinical Laboratory Practicum IV2
MDLS 4391 [WI] Integrated Clinical Laboratory Practice and Research2
Total Hours120

Associate of Applied Science in Histotechnology - Description

The A.A.S. in Histotechnology requires a total of 60 credit hours consisting of 23 credit hours of prerequisites, and 37 credit hours of technical program courses. Prerequisite courses may be taken at the university or any one of the thirteen consortium community colleges. The sophomore courses comprising the technical program will be taken in Fort Worth at the Schaffer Building and affiliated clinical hospital sites. Upon successful completion of the 60 hour program, students are eligible for the AAS Degree in Histotechnology awarded from Tarleton State University.

This program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Medical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS), 5600 N. River Road, Suite 720, Rosemont, IL 60018, (773) 714-8880. Successful completion of the program will require a grade of “C” or better in all lecture and laboratory courses and a grade of “P” in all clinical practicum courses. After successful completion of the program students are eligible for the Histotechnician exam administered by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) Board of Registry.

Acceptance into the Histotechnology program is on a competitive basis through an evaluation based on letters of recommendation and academic performance. Students must successfully complete prerequisites before the start of the technical program. Applications may be obtained on the program's website at https://www.tarleton.edu/medicallab. Students are accepted into the program three times a year to begin in either August, January or May. Application deadlines are listed on the application.

Students entering with an associate or baccalaureate degree, and who do not wish to earn the AAS in Histotechnology degree, must have the following prerequisites:

  • Biology: 8 hours including Microbiology
  • Chemistry: 4 hours
  • Math: 3 hours
  • English: 3 hours

For more information on the Histotechnology Program, contact:

Tina McCammish, HTL(ASCP)CM, HCM
HT Program Director
1501 Enderly Place
Fort Worth, Texas 76104
817-926-1101
vmccammish@tarleton.edu

Associate of Applied Science in Histotechnology

Required Courses
Required Histotechnology Courses to be taken in Fort Worth and affiliated clinical sites: 1
ENGL 1301 [WI] Composition I3
PSYC 2301General Psychology3
MATH 1314College Algebra3
Creative Arts or Language, Philosophy and Culture Elective3
BIOL 2402Anatomy & Physiology II4
HPTC 3350Microbiology for Allied Health Professionals3
CHEM 1407Fundamentals of Chemistry4
HLAB 2182Introduction to Medical Labratory Sciences 21
HLAB 2414Introduction to Histotechnology4
HLAB 2415Histotechnology I4
HLAB 2425Histotechnology II4
HLAB 2335Histotechnology III3
HLAB 2460Functional Histology4
HLAB 2364Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Techniques3
HLAB 2285Capstone Cases and Review 42
HLAB 2495Clinical Histotechnology I 24
HLAB 2496Clinical Histotechnology II 34
HLAB 2497Clinical Histotechnology III 44
Total Hours60
1

Students must earn a grade of “C” or better to earn credit for HLAB courses.

2

A student must enroll in these courses during their first semester whether it is Fall, Spring or Summer term.

3

A student must enroll in these courses during their second semester whether it is Fall, Spring or Summer term.

4

A student must enroll in these courses during their final semester whether it is Fall, Spring or Summer term.

Associate of Applied Science in Medical Laboratory Technology - Description

The A.A.S. in Medical Laboratory Technology requires a total of 60 credit hours consisting of 23 credit hours of prerequisites, and 37 credit hours of technical program courses. Prerequisite courses may be taken at the university or any one of the thirteen consortium community colleges. The sophomore courses comprising the technical program will be taken in Fort Worth at the Schaffer Building or TCCC and affiliated clinical hospital sites. Upon successful completion of the 60 hour program, students are eligible for the AAS Degree in Medical Laboratory Technology awarded from Tarleton State University.

This program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS), 5600 N. River Road, Suite 720, Rosemont, IL 60018, (773) 714-8880. After successful completion of the program students are eligible to take the Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT) exam administered by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) Board of Registry.

Acceptance into the Medical Laboratory Technology program is on a competitive basis through an evaluation based on letters of recommendation and academic performance. Students must successfully complete prerequisites before the start of the technical program in Fort Worth. Applications may be obtained on the program's website at https://www.tarleton.edu/medicallab. Students are accepted into the program three times a year to begin in either August, January or May. Application deadlines are listed on the application.

Students entering with an associates or baccalaureate degree must have the following prerequisites:

  • Biology: 8 hours including Microbiology
  • Chemistry: 4 hours
  • Math: 3 hours
  • English: 3 hours

For more information on the Medical Laboratory Technology program, contact:

Allison Kelly, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM, SBBCM, SQA (ASQ)
MLT Program Director and Instructor
1501 Enderly Place
Fort Worth, Texas 76104
(817) 926-1101
akelly@tarleton.edu

Associate of Applied Science in Medical Laboratory Technology

Required Courses
Required Medical Laboratory Technology Courses to be taken in Fort Worth affiliated clinical sites: 1
BIOL 2402Anatomy & Physiology II4
HPTC 3350Microbiology for Allied Health Professionals3
PSYC 2301General Psychology3
ENGL 1301 [WI] Composition I3
MATH 1314College Algebra3
Creative Arts or Language, Philosophy and Culture Elective (as advised)3
MLAB 2214Introduction to Urinalysis2
MLAB 2424Introduction to Hematology4
MLAB 2228Coagulation2
MLAB 2534Introduction of Medical Microbiology5
MLAB 2444Introduction to Immunohematology4
MLAB 2364Introduction to Immunology-Serology3
MLAB 2474Laboratory Operations4
MLAB 2576Introduction to Clinical Chemistry5
MLAB 2182Introductory Skills for Medical Laboratory Science 21
MLAB 2285Advanced Topics and Capstone Review 32
MLAB 2292MLT Field Practicum IV 32
MLAB 2193MLT Field Practicum III1
MLAB 2194MLT Field Practicum I1
MLAB 2195MLT Field Practicum II1
CHEM 1407Fundamentals of Chemistry4
Total Hours60
1

Students must earn a grade of “C” or better to earn credit for MLAB courses.

2

A student must enroll in these courses during their first semester whether it is Fall, Spring or Summer term.

3

A student must enroll in these courses during their final semester whether it is Fall, Spring or Summer term.

 
 

Bachelor of Applied Technology of Health Professions Technology - Description

Tarleton State University, a member of the Texas A&M University System, offers the professional degree Bachelor of Applied Technology in Health Professions Technology through its Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Public Health, and Nutrition Science in Fort Worth, Texas.

The Bachelor's of Applied Technology in Health Professions Technology is designed for the certified/licensed allied health practitioner who has earned an Associate's Degree and who desires or requires further education for professional development or personal satisfaction. This degree will give students who graduated from our Histotechnology or Medical Laboratory Technology programs, and graduates of other allied health associate degree programs, an opportunity to continue their education at Tarleton to earn a four year degree, while applying credit from their Workforce Education (WECM) courses.

Students seeking the Bachelor of Applied Technology in Health Professions Technology degree must hold one of the following Degrees and Certification or License:

  • AAS Medical Laboratory Technology, MLT (ASCP)
  • AAS Histotechnology, HT (ASCP)
  • AAS Dental Hygiene, Registered Dental Hygienist
  • AAS Emergency Medical Services, EMT Paramedic or equivalent
  • AAS Health Information Technology, Appropriate Certification
  • AAS Physical Therapy Assistant, Licensed PTA
  • AAS Radiologic Technology, Registered Radiology Technologist by American Registry of Radiology Technologists
  • AAS Respiratory Care, Registered Respiratory Therapist by National Board for Respiratory Therapy and Texas Department of Health
  • AAS Surgical Technology, Certified Surgical Technologist by Association of Surgical Technologists
  • AAS Biotechnology (Eligible students may articulate from Temple College, Collin County College or by permission of Department Head

For more information on the Health Professions Technology program, contact:

Ashleigh Willis M. Ed
BAT-HPT Program Director and Advisor
1501 Enderly Place
Fort Worth, TX 76104
817-926-1101
awillis@tarleton.edu

The Bachelor of Applied Technology of Health Professions Technology

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
Composition I
Composition II
Business and Professional Speaking 1
Choose one of the following [shared]:
General Psychology
Introductory Sociology
HPTC 3320Biotechnology and Bioethics3
HPTC 3350Microbiology for Allied Health Professionals3
HPTC 4304Health Care Management3
HPTC 4305 [WI] Issues and Trends in Health Care3
HPTC 4349Pharmacology for the Allied Health Professionals3
HPTC 4350Pathophysiology for the Health Professionals3
MDLS 4360Introduction to Clinical Immunology3
SOCI 4314Medical and Health Care Policy3
ENGT 3320Industrial Safety3
ENGL 3309 [WI] Technical Writing and Document Design3
Select 15 hours of the following:15
Current Issues in Business Operations
Administrative Information Systems
Web Development
Organizational Communication
Employment Law
Principles of Bio-Statistics
Organization Behavior
Leadership
Human Resource Management
Psychology of Learning
Educational Psychology
Behavior Analysis and Behavior Management
Prior Learning Credit:33
Total Hours120
1

Please see Academic Information section.

Bachelor of Science in Public Health - Description

The BS in Public Health degree provides a foundation for students wishing to obtain employment in a public health profession or continue their education with graduate studies in public health.This degree has two different concentration areas, which require 42 General Education credit hours, as well as the following 29-30 credits in the Public Health Field of Study

Public Health Educator Concentration

The Public Health Educator concentration will prepare students to provide health education, promote healthy lifestyles, prevent diseases, and enhance quality of life in communities. A strong foundation will be developed to understand distribution of health and illness in diverse populations, the relationship of social determinants to health and illness and disease risks among human populations.

The Public Health Educator curriculum focuses on interdisciplinary efforts to address the physical, social, behavioral, mental, and environmental health concerns of communities and populations at risk for disease and injury. Graduates will plan and evaluate health services in communities, coordinate the community efforts of government agencies, care systems and private organizations and serve as advocates of improved community wellness.

Pre-Graduate Public Health Concentration

Graduates of the Pre-Graduate Public Health program will be prepared to either enter employment as a Health Education specialist or other public health career or pursue a graduate education in public health.

For more information on the Public Health program, contact:

Subi Gandhi Ph.D., MPH
Associate Professor and Advisor
254-968-0578
gandhi@tarleton.edu

The Bachelor of Science in Public Health

Field of Study Courses
PBHL 1310Health and Society: An Introduction to Public Health3
PBHL 2310Introduction to Epidemiology3
PBHL 2320Medical Ethics3
PBHL 3310Principles of Health Promotion and Education3
PBHL 3320Statistics for Health Care3
PBHL 4305 [WI] Issues and Trends in Health Care3
PBHL 4310 [WI] Introduction to Health Management and Policy3
PBHL 4320Public Health Policy3
PBHL 4350Pathophysiology for the Health Professionals3
Other Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
BIOL 2401 [shared] Anatomy and Physiology I 1
BIOL 2402 [shared] Anatomy & Physiology II 1
COMM 2302 [shared] Business and Professional Speaking 2
ENGL 1301 [shared] [WI] Composition I 2
ENGL 1302 [shared] [WI] Composition II 2
Social and Behavioral Science Elective
Introductory Sociology 3
General Psychology 3
Total Hours69
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Public Health Educator
MKTG 3312Marketing3
MGMT 3302Human Resource Management3
HPTC 3350Microbiology for Allied Health Professionals3
HPTC 4349Pharmacology for the Allied Health Professionals3
HPTC 4304Health Care Management3
KINE 1301Foundations of Kinesiology3
HECO 1322Nutrition and Diet Therapy3
PSYC 3303Educational Psychology3
CHFS 3300Child Development: Theory, Research, and Practice3
CHFS 4356 [WI] Research Methods in Human Sciences3
SOCI 3304Medical Sociology3
SOCI 4314Medical and Health Care Policy3
COMM 2311News Gathering & Writing I3
COMM 3311 [WI] Feature Writing3
Choose from one of the following electives:3
Web Development
Digital Video Production
Technical Writing and Document Design
Choose from one of the following CHFS electives:3
Preprofessional Development
Child and Youth Guidance
Family Financial Management
Human Intimacy
Policies and Ethical Standards
PBHL 4085Seminar and Internship in Public Health3
Total Hours51
Pre-Graduate Public Health
CHEM 1311
CHEM 1111
College Chemistry I (Lecture)
and College Chemistry I (Laboratory)
4
CHEM 1312
CHEM 1112
College Chemistry II (Lecture)
and College Chemistry II (Laboratory)
4
MATH 1314 [shared] College Algebra
MATH 1342Elementary Statistical Methods3
BIOL 3407Microbiology4
MGMT 3302Human Resource Management3
CHFS 3300Child Development: Theory, Research, and Practice3
CHFS 4356 [WI] Research Methods in Human Sciences3
PSYC 2301General Psychology3
PSYC 3303Educational Psychology3
PSYC 3350Personality3
Select from the following Electives:3
Introduction to Clinical Immunology
Genetics
Introduction to Virology
Pathogenic Microbiology
Select two from the following Communications Electives:6
News Gathering & Writing I
Interpersonal Communication
Digital Video Production
Communication Law
Persuasion
Public Relations
Intercultural Communication
Environmental Communication
Organizational Communication
Select from the following Sociology Electives:3
Medical Sociology
Medical and Health Care Policy
Choose from one of the CHFS Electives:3
Preprofessional Development
Child and Youth Guidance
Family Financial Management
Human Intimacy
Policies and Ethical Standards
PBHL 4085Seminar and Internship in Public Health3
Total Hours51
Nutrition Science
NUTR 1307Concepts in Food and Nutrition3
NUTR 1316Principles of Food Preparation3
HECO 1322Nutrition and Diet Therapy3
FDSC 3304Food Processing3
NUTR 3321Life Cycle Nutrition3
NUTR 3325Advanced Meal Management 3
NUTR 3339 [WI] Introduction to Medical Nutrition Therapy3
NUTR 4335Food and Culture3
NUTR 4305Food Service Management3
CHEM 1311
CHEM 1111
College Chemistry I (Lecture)
and College Chemistry I (Laboratory)
4
CHEM 1312
CHEM 1112
College Chemistry II (Lecture)
and College Chemistry II (Laboratory)
4
CHEM 2323Organic Chemistry I 3
CHEM 2123Organic Chemistry I Laboratory1
CHEM 4374Biochemistry I3
BIOL 3407Microbiology4
MATH 1314 [shared] College Algebra
MATH 1342Elementary Statistical Methods3
PBHL 4285Seminar in Nutrition Science 2
Total Hours51
1

Students in all concentrations are required to take this course as the general education requirement in Life and Physical Sciences

2

Only students in tracks PHEB and PBPH are required to take this general education requirement. NUSC students can choose from approved list. 

3

Students in PHEB and PBPH must take SOCI 1301 as their Social and Behavioral Science Elective. Students in NUSC must take PSYC 2301 as their Social and Behavioral Science Elective.  

The Minor in Public Health

The minor in Public Health provides a foundation for students wishing to augment their health-related degree or profession. Graduates with the Public Health minor will have a better understanding of issues in community health, giving them a more well-rounded preparation for their careers.

Minor in Public Health

Required Courses
Students must take PBHL 1310 first
PBHL 1310Health and Society: An Introduction to Public Health3
PBHL 4305 [WI] Issues and Trends in Health Care3
PBHL 3310Principles of Health Promotion and Education3
PBHL 2320Medical Ethics3
PBHL 2310Introduction to Epidemiology3
Choose one of the following courses:3
Biotechnology and Bioethics
Pathophysiology for the Health Professionals
Statistics for Health Care
Introduction to Health Management and Policy
Public Health Policy
Total Hours18

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science - Description

The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition Science prepares graduates for a career in health care or community nutrition education and emphasizes:

  • Health, wellness, and life style habits related to food choices
  • Nutrients required by the body, their food source, functions, deficiencies and toxicities
  • Evidence-based medical nutrition therapy practices for disease prevention and treatment

This degree has two different concentration areas requiring 42 general credit hours and a 41-hour required program core. 

Dietetics Concentration

The Dietetics concentration is an Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) accredited Nutrition and Dietetics Didactic Program (DPD) program as part of a Consortium at Stephen F. Austin State University. This program prepares highly qualified graduates for supervised practice leading to eligibility for the CDR credentialing exam to become registered dietitian nutritionists (RDN). Dietetics track graduates will receive a verification statement at the end of the program indicating that they have met the requirements to apply for dietetic internship in preparation to become a RDN.

Food and Nutrition Concentration

The Food and Nutrition concentration incorporates food, nutrition, life science, public health, social science and social work courses to equip students with the knowledge and skills needed to educate a diverse population in the area of health and wellness. This track also provides a pathway for pre-nursing and pre-health students a way to complete a degree and enter a career in nutrition and health promotion in a timely manner.

For more information on the Nutrition Science program, contact:

Bailee Sawyer, Ph.D., RDN, LD
NS Program Director and Assistant Professor
1333 W. Washington
Stephenville, Texas 76402
(254) 968-0577
bsawyer@tarleton.edu

Nutrition Science

Field of Study Courses
NUTR 1307Concepts in Food and Nutrition3
HECO 1322Nutrition and Diet Therapy3
NUTR 1316Principles of Food Preparation3
FDSC 3304Food Processing3
NUTR 3321Life Cycle Nutrition3
NUTR 3325Advanced Meal Management 3
NUTR 3339 [WI] Introduction to Medical Nutrition Therapy3
NUTR 4335Food and Culture3
ANSC 4314Food Quality Assurance3
Microbiology4
Microbiology for Non-Science Majors
Microbiology
Chemistry4
Fundamentals of Chemistry
College Chemistry I (Lecture)
and College Chemistry I (Laboratory)
PBHL 3310Principles of Health Promotion and Education3
PBHL 4305 [WI] Issues and Trends in Health Care3
Other Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
BIOL 2401 [shared] Anatomy and Physiology I
BIOL 2402 [shared] Anatomy & Physiology II
PSYC 2301 [shared] General Psychology
Total Hours83
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Dietetics Track
NUTR 4305Food Service Management3
NUTR 4309Community Nutrition3
NUTR 4325Nutrition Counseling3
NUTR 4339Advanced Nutrition 3
NUTR 4349Medical Nutrition Therapy I3
NUTR 4379Medical Nutrition Therapy II3
MATH 1342Elementary Statistical Methods3
CHEM 1312
CHEM 1112
College Chemistry II (Lecture)
and College Chemistry II (Laboratory)
4
CHEM 2323Organic Chemistry I 3
CHEM 2123Organic Chemistry I Laboratory1
CHEM 4374Biochemistry I3
PBHL 2320Medical Ethics3
NUTR 4080Seminar in Nutrition Science2
Total Hours37
Food and Nutrition Track
Approved Electives12
Advanced Nutrition Electives6
PBHL 4310 [WI] Introduction to Health Management and Policy3
PSYC 3303Educational Psychology3
PSYC 3307The Human Lifespan3
SOCW 3303Social Work with Diverse Populations3
SOCW 4313Human Rights3
NUTR 4080Seminar in Nutrition Science4
Total Hours37
1

Students enrolled in the Dietetics Track concentration are required to take MATH 1314- College Algebra to fulfill general education Mathematics requirement. Students enrolled in the Food and Nutrition Track concentration can take any general education Mathematics course. 

Academic Advising Guides

Academic Advising Guides area available at the following website:

https://web.tarleton.edu/majorinfo/

Food Science Courses

FDSC 1307. Concepts and Controversies in Food Studies. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Principles of food studies and exploration of the role food narratives and exposés play in the consumer’s perception of the current food supply. Foundation for understanding the connections among food production, ecology, ethics, cuisine, nutrition and health within the framework of sustainability. Can receive credit for either FDSC 1307 or WSES 1307.

FDSC 1316. Principles of Food Preparation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Study of food, food composition, and scientific principles involved in food preparation. Can receive credit for either FDSC 1316 or NUTR 1316.

FDSC 3304. Food Processing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

The world food supply, trends and traditions in diet and food sanitation, safety, security, and biotechnology, and impact of processing on diet quality. Lab fee: $2.

FDSC 3325. Advanced Meal Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Fundamentals of nutrition and food preparation in all types of meal service. Special emphasis is on time and money management. Credit will be given for only one of the following: WSES 3325, FDSC 3325, or NUTR 3325.

FDSC 4335. Food and Culture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

A study of the food beliefs and practices of the major ethnic and religious groups in the U. S. and the nutritional implications of these food practices, a cultural analysis of American food trends; ethnic issues and dietary changes; and research methods in food habits. Credit will only be given for WSES 4335 or FDSC 4335.

FDSC 4407. Fermentation and Brewing. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

History of food safety, sanitation, fermentation, fermented foods, beer brewing, wine and cheese making, along with an introduction to industry organization; from commodities production, to processing, distribution, marketing, and sales. Hands-on instruction in small-scale brewing. Combines elements of science (chemistry, biology, and physics), economics, food preparation, aesthetics, preferences, and taste. Modest cost of field trips will be borne by the student. Credit will not be given for both WSES 4407 and FDSC 4407. Prerequisites: 8 hrs BIOL and 8 hrs CHEM; must be 21 years or age or older on the first class day to enroll in course.

FDSC 4408. Sustainable Food Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Issues surrounding food production and the environmental and social impact of current food production systems. Emerging trends to increase the sustainability of food production, distribution, and consumption. Includes a laboratory field component and will require some field work outside normal class times. Credit will not be given for both WSES 4408 and FDSC 4408.

Health Professions Technology Courses

HPTC 3320. Biotechnology and Bioethics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will cover the recent advances in biology which have made new techniques and technologies possible for the production of pharmaceuticals, foods, textiles, pesticides and chemicals. Ethical principles in biotechnology and biomedicine are studied and applied to contemporary problems in medicine and biomedical research. Additional topics include stem cell research; genetic testing; organ transplantation; and research involving human subjects.

HPTC 3350. Microbiology for Allied Health Professionals. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will focus on an introduction to modern medical microbiology that is clinically relevant for the allied health professional. General concepts of bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal infection will be addressed, followed by a survey of the major human pathogens in each of these categories. Conclusion of the course will include microbiology issues that are applicable to clinical infection control protocols.

HPTC 4304. Health Care Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Comprehensive survey of management principles and practices in the health care setting, with particular attention to the allied health arena. Management strategies, strategic planning and implementation, budgetary preparation, personnel resource management and compliance with governmental and professional accreditation regulations are addressed with integration of health care ethics.

HPTC 4305. Issues and Trends in Health Care. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course is designed to explore and discuss concepts and issues that are pertinent to allied health care professionals including legal and regulatory issues, health service reform and cost containment, workforce development, and quality assurance practices.

HPTC 4349. Pharmacology for the Allied Health Professionals. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will focus on a survey of the more important drugs used in medicine, including basic principles, clinical uses and possible adverse effects. Students will be introduced to important issues affecting drug approval, legislation, manufacturing, formulation and delivery, metabolism and measurement.

HPTC 4350. Pathophysiology for the Health Professionals. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will focus on presentation of interrelationships between normal body functioning and the physiologic changes that participate in disease production, and occur as a result of disease. Emphasis on major disorders and other selected disorders provides a concise, easy-to-understand introduction to the fundamentals.

Histology Technician Courses

HLAB 100. Research Histotechnology Wrksh. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

HLAB 2182. Introduction to Medical Labratory Sciences. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

An introductory course in medical laboratory science. Universal lab safety practices, computer applications for science and medicine, basic lab mathematics, quality control and basic laboratory equipment including microscopy, centrifugation, analytical weighing and other laboratory equipment common to all medical laboratories. This course must be taken during the first semester of enrollment in the HT/MLT certification programs. Lab Fee: $2.

HLAB 2285. Capstone Cases and Review. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Major theoretical and practical applications in histotechnology including preparation of staining portfolio, mock registry exam (program final) and attendance at pathologist case presentations. This course must be taken during the final semester of enrollment in the HT program. Lab Fee $2.

HLAB 2335. Histotechnology III. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 6 Hours).

Histotechniques: Special Staining; Theory and practice of histochemical staining techniques, including microorganism, tissue pigments, minerals, and neural tissue staining. Includes specialized techniques such as electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and muscle enzyme histochemistry. Lab Fee $2.

HLAB 2364. Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Techniques. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

This course covers the preparation and evaluation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) stains. Procedures and terminology related to IHC are also discussed and strategies for troubleshooting problems are presented. Molecular techniques such as ISH and genetic profiling are also introduced. Lab fee: $2.

HLAB 2414. Introduction to Histotechnology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Introduction to the healthcare environment and histology laboratory with emphasis on safety; infection control; mathematics; communication; medical terminology and ethical, legal and professional issues. Lab Fee $2.

HLAB 2415. Histotechnology I. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 6 Hours).

Histotechniques: Tissue Processing; Introduction to basic theories and practices of histotechnology including laboratory safety, fixation, tissue processing, embedding, microtomy, routine staining and operation and maintenance of lab equipment. Lab Fee $2.

HLAB 2425. Histotechnology II. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 6 Hours).

Histotechniques: Theory and practice of histochemical staining techniques. Topics include reagent preparation, basic tissue dye bonding, differentiation, quality control, nuclear, connective tissue and carbohydrate staining techniques. Lab Fee $2.

HLAB 2460. Functional Histology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 4 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Emphasizes the recognition, composition, and function of cells, cellular organelles, cell life cycles, blood and basic tissue types. This course also emphasizes the recognition, composition and function of organ systems including skeletal, nervous, circulatory, endocrine and reproductive system tissues. Lab fee: $2.

HLAB 2495. Clinical Histotechnology I. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 15 Hours).

An introductory histology laboratory-based learning experience that enables students to observe and apply theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. This course must be taken during the first semester of the HT program. Field Assignment Fee: $50.

HLAB 2496. Clinical Histotechnology II. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 15 Hours).

An intermediate histology laboratory-based learning experience that enables students to apply theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Course must be taken during the second semester of the HT program. Field Assignment Fee: $50 Prerequisite: HLAB 2495.

HLAB 2497. Clinical Histotechnology III. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 15 Hours).

An advanced histology laboratory based learning experience that enables students to apply and integrate theory, skills, and concepts and to work independently. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. This course must be taken during the last semester in the HT program. Prerequisites: HLAB 2495, HLAB 2496; Field Assignment Fee: $50.

Home Economics Courses

HECO 1322. Nutrition and Diet Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

(TCCNS = HECO 1322 or BIOL 1322) A study of the essential nutrients, including nutrient functions, food sources, deficiency symptoms, and toxicity symptoms; the nutritional requirements of individuals throughout the life cycle; the effects of nutrition on health and fitness; nutrition fads and controversies; and evaluation of personal eating habits. Prerequisite Course(s): One semester of chemistry is recommended.

HECO 1325. Housing and Interior Design I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

(TCCNS = HECO 1325) Factors influencing design selection with emphasis on the fundamental structure and decorative qualities of design, psychological approach to color, and creative problem-solving.

HECO 1328. Clothing Selection, Design and Construction. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

(TCCNS = HECO 1328) Principles of clothing construction taught through lecture, demonstration, instructional media, and hands-on laboratory experience. Students are required to construct personal garments and to produce samples illustrating various construction techniques. Lab fee $15. Prerequisite Course(s): FCSC 1201: Basic Clothing Construction.

HECO 2311. Fashion Merchandising. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

(TCCNS = HECO 2311) An introductory overview of the fashion business and its scope, economic importance, and marketing practices. The power of fashion and the role of the ultimate consumer are also addressed. Field trips may be required.

Medical Laboratory Sciences Courses

MDLS 1100. Transitioning to University Studies in Health Professions. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, and in the development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, and encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective. Also included will be the development of skills to promote physical and mental health.

MDLS 1111. Surv Allied Health Prof. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

Course description is needed.

MDLS 4086. Clinical Laboratory Science Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

A course open by invitation to capable Clinical Laboratory Science students who wish to pursue a selected problem study. Students are permitted and encouraged to work independently under the guidance of an instructor. May be repeated for credit, subject to the approval of the department head. Lab fee $2.

MDLS 4091. Integrated Clinical Laboratory Practice and Research. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5-15 Hours). [WI]

An integrated clinical laboratory course designed to introduce the concepts of specimen tracking and processing using a laboratory information system, test result utilization, utilization review, and clinical research. Emphasis will be placed on workload organization; quality control evaluation accuracy; consistency; validity of results generated; and appropriate reporting of results. Lab fee: $2.

MDLS 4092. Clinical Laboratory Practicum I. 1-5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5-40 Hours).

Structured clinical experience directed toward development of laboratory skills, organizing work, and solving problems in hematology, hemostasis, and body fluid analysis. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of quality assurance data and application of laboratory information systems and automation. Grading in this course is satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

MDLS 4093. Clinical Laboratory Practicum II. 1-5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 8-40 Hours).

Structured clinical experience directed toward development of laboratory skills, organizing work, and solving problems in medical microbiology and parasitology. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of quality assurance data and application of laboratory information systems and automation. Grading in this course is satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

MDLS 4094. Clinical Laboratory Practicum III. 1-5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 8-40 Hours).

Structured clinical experience directed toward development of laboratory skills, organizing work, and solving problems in immunology, serology, and blood banking. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of quality assurance data and application of laboratory information systems and automation. Grading in this course is satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

MDLS 4095. Clinical Laboratory Practicum IV. 1-5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 8-40 Hours).

Structured clinical experience directed toward development of laboratory skills, organizing work and solving problems in clinical chemistry, toxicology, and molecular pathology. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of quality assurance data and application of laboratory information systems and automation. Grading in this course is satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

MDLS 4096. Advanced Clinical Practicum. 1-8 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 3-24 Hours).

Structured clinical experience directed toward development of laboratory skills, organizing work, and solving problems in the clinical laboratory. Emphasis is given to high complexity testing. Grading in this course is satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

MDLS 4104. Clinical Correlations and Capstone Review Specialty. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course employs an integrative approach to laboratory medicine with emphasis on the review of patient cases and appropriate utilization of laboratory tests in diagnosis and case management. A comprehensive review and assessment of the concepts in a specialty area of medical laboratory medicine. Prerequisite: Acceptance to Public Health Microbiology Categorical Certification program.

MDLS 4115. Urinalysis and Body Fluids Laboratory. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Supervised learning experiences using microscopic, chemical, and automated techniques in analysis of urine, synovial, seminal, cerebrospinal, serous, and amniotic fluid.

MDLS 4125. Hematology I Laboratory. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5 Hours).

Supervised experiences with emphasis placed on the enumeration, morphology and staining characteristics of normal blood cells as well as analytes to evaluate coagulation and fibrinolysis. Manual and automated techniques will be used. Emphasis will be placed on specimen collection, processing, and generation and evaluation of diagnostic data.

MDLS 4127. Hematology II Laboratory. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5 Hours).

Supervised experiences with emphasis placed on the enumeration, morphology, and staining characteristics of abnormal blood cells. Emphasis will be placed on specimen processing and generation and evaluation of diagnostic data. Lab fee $2. Prerequisite: MDLS 4125 or approval of department head. Co-Requisite: MDLS 4226 or approval of department head.

MDLS 4128. Hemostasis. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 2 Hours).

Discussion and comparison of the hemostatic coagulation and fibrinolytic systems with emphasis on normal and abnormal physiology. Supervised learning experiences with emphasis on analytes to evaluate coagulation and fibrinolysis. Manual and automated techniques will be discussed and used.

MDLS 4135. Medical Microbiology I Lab. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5 Hours).

Supervised experience with emphasis on isolation, staining, culture, and differential biochemical characteristics of pathogenic microorganisms and human parasites. Specimen collection, processing and criteria for rejection will also be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on deriving diagnostic laboratory results and evaluation of those results.

MDLS 4137. Medical Microbiology II Lab. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5 Hours).

Supervised experience with emphasis on staining, isolation, identification, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of microorganisms isolated from clinical specimens. Emphasis is also placed on specimen processing and generation and evaluation of diagnostic data. Lab fee $2. Prerequisite: MDLS 4135 or approval of department head. Co-Requisite: MDLS 4236 or approval of department head.

MDLS 4147. Immunohematology II Lab. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Supervised experiences related to antibody detection and identification, incompatibility and transfusion reaction resolution; component processing and storage; and selection for therapy. Emphasis is placed on specimen processing, laboratory techniques, and generation and evaluation of diagnostic data. Lab fee $2. Prerequisite: MDLS 4145. Co-Requisite: MDLS 4246.

MDLS 4148. Introduction to Medical Genetics. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An introduction to the concepts of gene structure and inheritance patterns. Emphasis will be placed on the types of inheritance patterns associated with different disease conditions in which clinical diagnostics plays a valuable role in disease diagnosis or patient counseling.

MDLS 4149. Immunohematology Lab. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5 Hours).

Supervised experiences related to blood grouping and typing and compatibility testing, antibody detection and identification, incompatibility and transfusion reaction resolution; component processing and storage; and selection for therapy. Emphasis is placed on specimen processing, laboratory techniques, and generation and evaluation of diagnostic data.

MDLS 4169. Immunology and Serology Lab. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Supervised learning experience with emphasis on the detection, identification, and characterization of antigens and antibodies involved in autoimmune disease and infectious etiology using serologic techniques. Also emphasis on cells involved in cellular immunity using immunologic techniques, specimen processing and generation and evaluation of diagnostic data.

MDLS 4174. Introduction to Laboratory Safety and Instrumentation. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 2 Hours).

Introduction to the theories and principles of instrument operation and safety practices commonly used in the clinical laboratory. Supervised learning experience in instrument operation and troubleshooting.

MDLS 4175. Advanced Laboratory Automation, Statistics, and Quality Assurance Concepts. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 12 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion and comparison of operating principles of automated analyzers, complex laboratory techniques, statistical methods and quality assurance concepts applicable to the clinical laboratory. Supervised learning experience in instrument operation, troubleshooting, electrophoresis and chromatography. Application of statistics to quality assurance and evaluation of laboratory results will be discussed.

MDLS 4177. Clinical Chemistry I Lab. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5 Hours).

Supervised learning experiences with emphasis on manual, semi-automated, and automated procedures for assaying electrolytes, blood gases, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and drugs. Emphasis is placed on specimen processing and generation and evaluation of diagnostic data. Lab fee $2. Prerequisite: MDLS 4174. Co-Requisite: MDLS 4276.

MDLS 4179. Clinical Chemistry II Lab. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5 Hours).

Supervised learning experiences with emphasis on manual, semi-automated, and automated procedures for assaying metabolites, drugs, enzymes, hormones, and tumor markers. Emphasis is placed on specimen selection, processing, analyses, and evaluation of diagnostic data. Lab fee $2. Prerequisite: MDLS 4177. Co-Requisite: MDLS 4278.

MDLS 4202. Molecular Diagnostics. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An overview of molecular mechanisms including replication, transcription, and translation. Emphasis is placed on the principles of molecular methods and their application in diagnosis of microbiologic, immunologic, genetic, endocrine, hematopoietic, and metabolic disease.

MDLS 4204. Clinical Correlations and Capstone Review Speciality. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course employs an integrative approach to laboratory medicine with emphasis on the review of patient cases and appropriate utilization of laboratory tests in diagnosis and case management. A comprehensive review and assessment of the concepts in a specialty area of medical laboratory medicine.

MDLS 4214. Urinalysis and Body Fluids Lecture. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion in renal physiology, relationship to renal and other systemic diseases, physiologic function and pathophysiology of synovial, seminal, cerebrospinal, serous, and amniotic fluid.

MDLS 4226. Hematology II Lecture. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Studies on the formation and identification of abnormal cellular blood elements are discussed. Emphasis is placed on abnormal physiology and hematologic manifestations of disease. Prerequisite: MDLS 4224 or approval of department head. Co-Requisite: MDLS 4125 or approval of department head.

MDLS 4244. Immunohematology I Lecture. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion of the principles of immunohematology in relation to blood grouping, typing, compatibility testing, and antibody detection and identification. Co-Requisite: MDLS 4145 or approval of department head.

MDLS 4246. Immunohematology II Lecture. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion of the principles of immunohematology in relation to transfusion and transplant medicine, donor processing, and component preparation and storage. Prerequisite: MDLS 4244. Co-Requisite: MDLS 4147.

MDLS 4274. Introduction to Lab Safety and Operations. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 1 Hour).

Introduction to the theories and principles of instrument operation and safety practices commonly used in the clinical laboratory. Supervised learning experience in instrument operation and troubleshooting and the use of computers in the scientific and medical fields.

MDLS 4276. Clinical Chemistry I Lecture. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to the theories and principles of diagnostic methods used to measure common analytes involved in water and acid base balance, mineral and metabolic homeostasis in serum and other body fluids. Normal physiology and biochemical manifestation of disease are emphasized. Co-requisite : MDLS 4177.

MDLS 4324. Hematology I Lecture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion of the formation, function, physiology, and identification of normal blood cellular elements in all ages and hemostatic coagulation and fibrinolytic systems with emphasis on normal and abnormal physiology.

MDLS 4334. Medical Microbiology I Lecture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion of pathology, growth characteristics, morphology, physiology, and identification criteria of human pathogenic microorganisms, normal flora and parasites causing disease in humans. Opportunistic parasites in the immunocompromised host will also be addressed.

MDLS 4336. Medical Microbiology II Lecture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion of advanced microbiological concepts including anaerobic bacteria, mycobacterium, antimicrobial susceptibility, mycology, virology, and infections by organ system. Emphasis is on epidemiology, pathogenesis, source of isolation, and conventional and molecular methods of diagnosis of human pathogenic organisms.

MDLS 4360. Introduction to Clinical Immunology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion of immunological mechanisms fundamental to resistance to disease. Emphasis is placed on the basic humoral and cellular immune response and resistance to microbial disease with particular attention to medical laboratory assay principles.

MDLS 4364. Immunology and Serology Lecture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion of immunological mechanisms fundamentals to resistance to disease including basic humoral and cellular immune responses, mechanisms and pathogenesis involved in microbial, autoimmune, allergic, and immunodeficient disease.

MDLS 4378. Clinical Chemistry II Lecture. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion and comparison of diagnostic methods employed in the clinical chemistry laboratory. Emphasis is placed on diagnostic metabolites, enzymology, endocrinology,tumor markers, and advanced methods and technologies. Normal physiology and biochemical manifestations of disease are discussed.

MDLS 4391. Integrated Clinical Laboratory Practice and Research. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5-15 Hours). [WI]

An integrated clinical laboratory course designed to introduce the concepts of specimen tracking and processing using a laboratory information system, test result utilization, utilization review, and clinical research. Emphasis will be placed on workload organization; quality control evaluation accuracy; consistency; validity of results generated; and appropriate reporting of results. Lab fee $2.

MDLS 4444. Immunohematology Lecture. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 4 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Discussion of the principles of immunohematology in relation to blood grouping, typing, compatibility testing, and antibody detection and identification, transfusion and transplant medicine, donor processing, and component preparation and storage.

MDLS 4592. Clinical Laboratory Practicum I. 1-5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 5-40 Hours).

Structured clinical experience directed toward development of laboratory skills, organizing work, and solving problems in hematology, hemostasis, and body fluid analysis. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of quality assurance data and application of laboratory information systems and automation. Grading in this course is satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

MDLS 4593. Clinical Laboratory Practicum II. 1-5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 8-40 Hours).

Structured clinical experience directed toward development of laboratory skills, organizing work, and solving problems in medical microbiology and parasitology. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of quality assurance data and application of laboratory information systems and automation. Grading in this course is satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

MDLS 4594. Clinical Laboratory Practicum III. 1-5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 8-40 Hours).

Structured clinical experience directed toward development of laboratory skills, organizing work, and solving problems in immunology, serology, and blood banking. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of quality assurance data and application of laboratory information systems and automation. Grading in this course is satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

MDLS 4595. Clinical Laboratory Practicum IV. 1-5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 8-40 Hours).

Structured clinical experience directed toward development of laboratory skills, organizing work and solving problems in clinical chemistry, toxicology, and molecular pathology. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of quality assurance data and application of laboratory information systems and automation. Grading in this course is satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

MDLS 4896. Advanced Clinical Practicum. 1-8 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 3-24 Hours).

Structured clinical experience directed toward development of laboratory skills, organizing work, and solving problems in the clinical laboratory. Emphasis is given to high complexity testing. Grading in this course is satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Medical Laboratory Technician Courses

MLAB 2182. Introductory Skills for Medical Laboratory Science. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

An introductory course in the medical laboratory sciences program that includes basic laboratory safety practices, computer applications, lab mathematics, quality control and basic laboratory equipment. This course must be taken during the first semester of enrollment on the MLT and HT certification programs. Course fee $25.

MLAB 2193. MLT Field Practicum III. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 7 Hours).

Structured supervised work-based instruction that helps students gain practical experience, enhance skills and integrate knowledge in microbiology and urinalysis.

MLAB 2194. MLT Field Practicum I. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 7 Hours).

Structured supervised work-based instruction that helps students gain practical experience, enhance skills and integrate knowledge in blood bank, serology and automation.

MLAB 2195. MLT Field Practicum II. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 7 Hours).

Structured supervised work-based instruction that helps students gain practical experience, enhance skills and integrate knowledge in chemistry and hematology.

MLAB 2214. Introduction to Urinalysis. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 5 Hours).

An introduction to urinalysis and body fluid analysis, including the anatomy and physiology of the kidney, and physical, chemical and microscopic examination of urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and other body fluids. Lab fee $2.

MLAB 2228. Coagulation. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

A course in coagulation theory, procedures, and practical applications. Includes laboratory exercises which rely on commonly performed manual and semi-automated methods.

MLAB 2285. Advanced Topics and Capstone Review. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines the integration of all areas/concepts of the laboratory and correlates laboratory test data with diagnostic applications and pathophysiology using critical thinking skills. This course includes a capstone examination and may only be taken during the last semester of the MLT/HT programs.

MLAB 2292. MLT Field Practicum IV. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 14 Hours).

Structured, supervised work-based instruction that helps students gain practical experience in the clinical laboratory. Opportunities are centered in the rural health setting. Course must be taken in the last semester of the MLT program.

MLAB 2364. Introduction to Immunology-Serology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

An introduction to the theory and application of basic immunology, including the immune response, principles of antigen-antibody reactions, and principles and techniques of serologic procedures. Lab fee $2.

MLAB 2424. Introduction to Hematology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 6 Hours).

Introduction to the theory and practical application of routine procedures, both manual and automated. Red blood cell and white blood cell physiology, morphology (normal and abnormal), maturation sequences and associated diseases are included. Lab fee $2.

MLAB 2444. Introduction to Immunohematology. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 8 Hours).

A study of blood group antigens and antibodies. Performance of routine blood banking procedures, including blood group and Rh typing, antibody screens, antibody identification, cross matching, elution and absorption techniques. Lab fee $2.

MLAB 2474. Laboratory Operations. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 7 Hours).

An intermediate course in the clinical laboratory sciences that includes the principles of laboratory instrumentation and automation, quality control concepts, point of care testing and phlebotomy. Supervised laboratory experiences in instrument operation, calibration and maintenance, and point of care testing and phlebotomy. Lab fee $2.

MLAB 2534. Introduction of Medical Microbiology. 5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 4 Hours, Lab: 5 Hours).

Instruction in the theory, practical application and pathogenesis of clinical microbiology, including specimen collection, processing, identification, susceptibility testing and reporting procedures. Lab fee $2.

MLAB 2576. Introduction to Clinical Chemistry. 5 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 8 Hours).

An introduction to the principles and procedures of various tests performed in clinical chemistry. Presents the physiological basis for the test, the principle and procedure for the test and the clinical significance of the test results including quality control and normal values. Also includes basic chemical laboratory techniques and safety for electrolytes, acid-base balance, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymes, metabolites, endocrine function, therapeutic drug monitoring, and toxicology. Lab fee $2.

Nutrition Courses

NUTR 1307. Concepts in Food and Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles of food studies and exploration of the role food narratives and exposés play in the consumer’s perception of the current food supply. Foundation for understanding the connections among food production, ecology, ethics, cuisine, nutrition and health within the framework of sustainability.

NUTR 1316. Principles of Food Preparation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Study of food, food composition, and scientific principles involved in food preparation. Can receive credit for either NUTR 1316 or FDSC 1316.

NUTR 3321. Life Cycle Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Explores in depth the contribution that diet and nutrition make to support growth and the development process throughout the life cycle. Examines the distinct set of nutritional priorities for each stage of the life cycle with a focus on health promotion and disease prevention as underlying lifetime goals. Prerequisite: WSES 1322 or HECO 1322.

NUTR 3325. Advanced Meal Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Fundamentals of nutrition and food preparation in all types of meal service. Special emphasis is on time and money management. Credit will be given for only one of the following: WSES 3325, FDSC 3325, or NUTR 3325.

NUTR 3339. Introduction to Medical Nutrition Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Physiological basis and application of medical nutrition therapy using the nutrition care process as related to specific health conditions. Medical terminology, nutrition assessment techniques and case studies. Prerequisite: HECO 1322.

NUTR 4080. Seminar in Nutrition Science. 2-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 4 Hours).

Comprehensive and integrated application of knowledge and skills acquired in the food and nutrition program in a practical setting. Designed to provide students with skills of synthesizing and presenting the results of lower-division work. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.

NUTR 4305. Food Service Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles of management applied to food service systems including restaurants and institutions.

NUTR 4309. Community Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Overview of techniques and procedures for collecting, recording, analyzing and interpreting data for nutritional assessment; program development and presentation techniques for application to individuals and community groups. Prerequisite: HECO 1322.

NUTR 4315. Medical Nutrition Therapy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Physiological basis and application of medical nutrition therapy using the nutrition care process as related to specific health conditions. Medical terminology, nutrition assessment techniques and case studies. May receive credit for either WSES 4315 or NUTR 4315. Prerequisite: HECO 1322.

NUTR 4325. Nutrition Counseling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Nutrition counseling and interventions in the nutrition care process; communication skills and application for prevention and treatment of nutrition-related disease states. Prerequisite: NUTR 4315.

NUTR 4339. Advanced Nutrition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Metabolic processes that involve essential dietary components and methods of evaluating nutrition status. Prerequisites: NUTR 4315 and CHEM 4374 with minimum grade of C or instructor approval.

NUTR 4349. Medical Nutrition Therapy I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Study of the physiological basis and application of medical nutrition therapy using the nutrition care process to nutrition support, metabolic stress, disorders of energy imbalance, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and a variety of gastrointestinal disorders encountered in the clinical setting. Prerequisites: NUTR 4315, BIOL 2401 and 2402; MATH 1342 or PBHL 3320.

NUTR 4379. Medical Nutrition Therapy II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Study of the physiological basis and application of medical nutrition therapy using the nutrition care process to diabetes, renal disease, liver disease, cancer, and HIV as encountered in the clinical setting. Prerequisite: NUTR 4349.

Public Health Courses

PBHL 1310. Health and Society: An Introduction to Public Health. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to the structure of the United States health care system and major issues in the delivery of quality health care. The course focus is upon the interaction of individual, societal, and policy aspects of health care in a changing health care delivery system.

PBHL 2310. Introduction to Epidemiology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to introduce the public health student to the methodology used to study incidence, prevalence and risk factors associated with human disease. Students will develop practical skills used in public health to design and interpret epidemiologic studies and an understanding of the application of evidence-based medicine to increase quality of medical care.

PBHL 2320. Medical Ethics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides a foundation of ethical issues in both medical practice and public health administration. A foundation consisting of concepts from philosophy and political science will be provided in the context of both historical and current events.

PBHL 3310. Principles of Health Promotion and Education. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An overview of the types of programs in the field of health education and health promotion and techniques utilized in a variety of community settings. Discussion includes social behavior in individual health decisions and the role of the educator to provide motivational tools that lead to healthy lifestyles. Ethical issues and measures of success in health interventions are also considered.

PBHL 3320. Statistics for Health Care. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

Practical applications of general principles of descriptive and inferential statistics used in health care research. Topics include statistical principles, descriptive statistics, regression analysis, study design, vital statistics and reportable diseases or conditions. Mastery of basic methods in statistical analysis will be enhanced by the utilization of statistical software. Prerequisites: PBHL 2310.

PBHL 4085. Seminar and Internship in Public Health. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-4 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Comprehensive and integrated application of knowledge and skills acquired in the Public Health program in a practical setting. Success will depend upon the ability to demonstrate professional competence in public health practice. The 3 credit hour course is available for Public health Concentrations I and III and the 4 credit hour course is available for Concentration II only. The 2 hour course is available for Concentration IV only. Prerequisites: Approval of Program Director or major in Public Health.

PBHL 4285. Seminar in Nutrition Science. 2 Credit Hours (Lecture: 2 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Comprehensive and integrated application of knowledge and skills acquired in the food and nutrition program in a practical setting. Designed to provide students with skills of synthesizing and presenting the results of lower-division work.

PBHL 4305. Issues and Trends in Health Care. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course is designed to explore and discuss concepts and issues that are pertinent to allied health care professionals including legal and regulatory issues, health service reform and cost containment, workforce development, and quality assurance practices. Credit for both HPTC 4305 and PBHL 4305 will not be awarded.

PBHL 4310. Introduction to Health Management and Policy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Examines the structure of health care systems and policies that impact health programs and financing of health services. Emphasis is placed upon planning and management issues in various health care delivery organizations.

PBHL 4320. Public Health Policy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to laws and regulations governing health care professionals and medical institutions. Class discussions examine the balance between individual rights and health care providers’ activities with public health powers and community health needs. The course includes bioethical principles underlying public health and health care practice.

PBHL 4350. Pathophysiology for the Health Professionals. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will focus on presentation of interrelationships between normal body functioning and the physiologic changes that participate in disease production, and occur as a result of disease. Emphasis on major disorders and other selected disorders provides a concise, easy-to-understand introduction to the fundamentals.

PBHL 4385. Seminar in Community Health Education. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Comprehensive and integrated application of knowledge and skills acquired in the Public Health program in a practical setting. Success will depend upon the ability to demonstrate professional competence in public health practice. Prerequisite: Approval of Program Director or major in Public Health.

PBHL 4485. Seminar in Pre-Graduate Public Health. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 4 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Comprehensive and integrated application of knowledge and skills acquired in the Public Health program in a practical setting. Success will depend upon the ability to demonstrate professional competence in public health practice. Prerequisite: Approval of Program Director or major in Public Health.

Tarleton State University
Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Public Health, and Nutrition Science
1501 Enderly Place
Fort Worth, Texas 76104
(817) 926-1101
(817) 922-8103
www.tarleton.edu/medicallab

LeAnne Hutson, Ph.D., MLS(ASCP)
Department Head and Assistant Professor
On-Campus: 7226 Off-Campus: (817) 926-1101
lhutson@tarleton.edu

Subi Gandhi, Ph.D., MS
Associate Professor
254.968.0578
gandhi@tarleton.edu

Heping Han, Ph.D., MD, MB(ASCP)
DMS Program Director and Associate Professor
On-Campus: 7239 Off-Campus: (817) 926-1101
heping@tarleton.edu

Allison Kelly, MS, MLS(ASCP), SBB, SQA (ASQ)
MLT Program Director and Instructor
On-Campus:7242 Off-Campus: (817) 926-1101
akelly@tarleton.edu

Sally Lewis, Ph.D., MLS(ASCP), HTL, MB
Professor
On-Campus: 7222 Off-Campus: (817) 926-1101
slewis@tarleton.edu

Paula McKeehan, MS, RDN, LD
Assistant Professor of Nutrition Science
254.968.9195
pmckeehan@tarleton.edu

Girdhari Rijal, Ph.D., MLS(ASCP)
Assistant Professor
On-Campus:7227 Off-Campus: (817) 926-1101
rijal@tarleton.edu

Myoung-Gwi Ryou, Ph.D., MS, MLS
Associate Professor and MLS Program Director
On-Campus:7223 Off-Campus: (817) 926-1101
ryou@tarleton.edu

Bailee Sawyer, Ph.D., RDN, LD
Assistant Professor and Nutrition Science Program Director
On-Campus: 7114 Off-Campus: (254)968-0577
bsawyer@tarleton.edu