Graduate English Courses

ENGL 5085. English Seminar. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Content varies according to the needs and desires of the students. When topic varies, course may be taken for credit more than once. Open to students of graduate classification.

ENGL 5086. Special Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

Conference course. Directed independent study under supervision of a senior faculty member.

ENGL 5088. Thesis. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-6 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Scheduled when student is ready to begin thesis. No credit until thesis is accepted. Prerequisites: 24 hours of graduate credit, including ENGL 5398, and prior approval of department head.

ENGL 5310. Studies in American Literature. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Focuses on restricted periods in American literary history. Examples include colonial American literature, the American Renaissance, American literary naturalism, post-World War II American literature, and minority literature in America. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENGL 5312. Studies in British Literature. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Exploration of topics in British literature. Major and minor authors, single or multiple genres, and various themes may be covered, depending on instructor's choice of topic. May be repeated once for course credit when topics vary.

ENGL 5314. Literary Theory. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The focus of this course is to introduce students to literary theory, either via a broad diachronic study or by examining a particular critical approach as it applies to literary texts, depending on instructor's choice of topic. May be repeated for course credit when the topic varies.

ENGL 5315. The Graphic Novel. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students in this class will study the graphic narrative: the combination of images and text to convey meaning. While the graphic novel is the primary genre explored, other related forms and genres such as comics, comic strips, and web-comics could also be utilized as supplemental material especially for comparative purposes. In this course students will analyze the formal structures of, diverse uses of, or applications of the graphic novel. Note: The course content will vary depending on the instructor teaching; focus of the course for the semester will be made clear in the course schedule for the given term. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 5316. African-American Literature. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course introduces students to African-American literature, either via a broad diachronic study or by examining a particular theme, depending on instructor's choice of topic.

ENGL 5317. Folklore. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines the connections between folklore, its occurrence in daily life, and the scholarly analysis of its use in culture from varied times and societies. Students will examine how folklore may potentially shape individual or group attitudes, values and beliefs on varied topics. Students will reflect on their actual belief systems and how those systems develop and inform other aspects of their lives and the lives of others. As a graduate course, students will learn appropriate research methodologies common to the study of folklore. Note: The course content will vary depending on the instructor teaching; focus of the course for the semester will be made clear in the course schedule for the given term. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

ENGL 5318. Women’s Literature. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is designed to explore the literary works of women writers, their contributions to the greater literary tradition, and the social commentaries that emerge from the texts. Students will also be expected to recognize the ways in which women writers respond to traditional literary discourse. Specific topics, eras, and genres will vary with the instructor.

ENGL 5319. Beat and Hippie Literature. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The purpose of this course is to immerse students in the movements, themes, trends, tropes, and innovations that constitute a beginning grasp of both the Beat and the Hippie Movements as they pertain to literature and by extension American culture. Beginning in post-war America and moving through the 1960s, the seminal texts of these two similar but different eras convey, initially, the disillusionment with and rebellion to the burgeoning American consumerism and conservatism of the Eisenhower years, the emergence of a national counter culture seeking universal truths outside of Western mythologies, the advent of drugs along with the widening celebration of first jazz (bebop) and then rock ‘n roll, and then move on to vehement protests of the disastrous war in Vietnam, the changing mores of sexuality in America, and the consequent Generation Gap.

ENGL 5320. Studies in the English Language. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Focuses on historical and/or linguistic study of the English language. Topics will vary. Examples include history of the English language and the English language in America. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENGL 5321. Psycholinguistics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Deals with a variety of formal cognitive mechanisms that are relevant to the knowledge and use of natural languages. Primary emphasis is on the modular view of the mind and its consequences for both L1 and L2 language acquisition.

ENGL 5328. Ethics in Technical and Professional Writing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course focuses on the professional ethics of professional and technical writers; addresses the ethical issues associated with the design, use, and propagation of technology; and other ethical and rhetorical challenges for technical communicators. At virtually all stages of development and use, any technology can carry with it ethical dilemmas for both creators and users. Of particular interest is how such dilemmas are resolved (or complicated) according to how effectively they are communicated to stakeholders. By exploring historical and present-day case studies related to such topics as the environment, research and development, safety, corporate responsibility, and whistle blowing, students will analyze and practice various forms of technical communication. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

ENGL 5330. Studies in Rhetoric. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of written language theories. Course contents include readings from a wide spectrum including classical Greece and Rome, the European enlightenment, nineteenth century America, and modern and post-modern periods. May be retaken for credit when topics vary.

ENGL 5331. History of Rhetoric I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The Classical Era through the Enlightenment – A survey of the early history of rhetorical study. Course contents include readings from classical Greece and Rome as well as significant eras such as the Medieval period, the Renaissance, and the European Enlightenment.

ENGL 5332. History of Rhetoric II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Continuation of the study of rhetorical history. Course contents include readings from the nineteenth century as well as modern and postmodern rhetorical studies. The course places a particular emphasis on discourse analysis and contemporary application of rhetorical theory.

ENGL 5333. Rhetorical Criticism. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Explores the principles of rhetorical theory and criticism for writing studies and technical communication. Analysis of a variety of popular and political and persuasive messages, which may include political speeches, commercial advertising, artwork, song lyrics, scientific articles for popular audiences and within science communities, workplace writing, writing for social media, and other forms of purposeful presentation of argument.

ENGL 5334. Introduction to Visual Rhetoric. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduces theories of visual rhetoric and visual design, especially as applied to instructions and presentation of technical and scientific content.

ENGL 5335. Seminar in Professional Writing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This class studies the theory and practical applications at work in the production of technical and professional documents. Students will study and produce written documents for a variety of audiences and fields.

ENGL 5336. Grant and Proposal Writing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles and practice in writing grant applications and proposals, including finding grants. May include a service learning project.

ENGL 5337. Intercultural Technical and Professional Writing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Considers the implications of communicating scientific and technical content and information to many cultures. Looks at technical communication in light of cultural values and cultural mores.

ENGL 5338. Technical Editing: Practice and Theory. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Explores the practices and processes of technical, professional, and workplace editing and the theories that support those practices. Covers hand and electronic markup and editing as applied to text, document design, and information architecture. Students complete an editing project from analysis to delivery.

ENGL 5339. Studies in Disability Rhetoric. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course offers advanced study in the theory, nature, and practice of discourse. In this course we will explore aspects of discourse of and about disability: how we identify and define it, how we perceive and respond to it, and mostly, how we communicate about it (verbally, through written texts, and otherwise).

ENGL 5340. Studies in Modern Fiction. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An evaluation of English and American short stories, novels, and related criticism. Topics will vary and will include study of themes and development of the genre. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENGL 5345. Film Studies. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The focus of this course is to introduce students to film as a literary medium. Through a focused study of films and varied film industries, students will examine the narrative qualities central to the filmic experience. Students will also explore genre theory and the formulas of genre.

ENGL 5350. Studies in Literature Before 1500. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of representative types of pre-1500 literature in English. Topics may vary. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENGL 5360. Modern American and British Poetry. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of representative themes in the development of American and English poetry. Related critical readings will be studied. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENGL 5370. Studies in Comparative Literature. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A comparative study of great literature in the world in translation. Topics may vary and may include examination of theme, technique, and type. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENGL 5371. Scholarly Writing in Health. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Intensive scholarly writing in the health sciences and related fields emphasizing elements and techniques of credible, scholarly writing and critical thinking. This courses utilizes American Psychological Association (APA) format and style. Student evolution in writing will be developed through sequential papers and faculty/peer feedback.

ENGL 5380. Studies in the Teaching of Composition. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The course is devoted to the study of the aims, skills, materials, and practices of composition teaching at college and junior college levels. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENGL 5396. Digital Humanities. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course brings students to the intersection of humanities research and the digital age, as they explore methods of research, presentation and communication within the field. We will trace the advent of digital scholarship at the end of the 20th century and confront the multiple forms of publication open to scholars in the 21st. While recognizing that hard copy research and writing will never be removed from the fields of scholarship, we must accept that humanities research has begun to move and continues to move forward via online and electronic formats. Students will learn how to conduct research using digitized texts and manuscripts and will create their own portfolios, demonstrating different methods of digital communication for a single topic. In addition to reading some of the major innovators in the area of digital humanities, students will also work with programs to create visual and audio components of their research.

ENGL 5397. Internship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 7 Hours).

Supervised professional activities in the college composition classroom including presentations, evaluation, and conferences. May be repeated once for credit. Field experience fee $50.

ENGL 5398. Methods of Bibliography and Research Analysis. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to methods of research and effective utilization of library resources. May include analytical bibliography, enumerative bibliography, and textual criticism.