2019-20 Catalog

Government, Legal Studies, and Philosophy

The Department of Government, Legal Studies, and Philosophy offers programs of study leading to Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in Political Science (with American Politics, Comparative Politics/International Relations, and Social Science composite teacher certification concentrations), a Bachelor of Arts degree in Legal Studies (with Public Law and Paralegal concentrations), and a Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies.  In addition, the department offers minor programs of study in International Studies, Legal Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, and Public Policy.  A certificate in Environmental Policy is also available.


Political Science

The department offers programs of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree in Political Science.  These major programs of study are designed for students who seek skills and substantive knowledge necessary to better understand the causes and effects of a wide variety of governmental institutions, processes, policies, and political behavior in preparation for exciting career opportunities both within and outside government.  Students get training in comparative methodology, international politics, political philosophy, research methods, and develop their own capstone project.  Students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree take a 14-unit sequence in a foreign language of their choice, while students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree take an equivalent 14-unit sequence in calculus and statistics.  Students also select from a variety of elective options in line with their concentration area of focus of either American Politics, Comparative Politics/International Relations, or Social Science composite teacher certification.  

American Politics concentration

The Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with a concentration in American Politics provides students with a strong foundation in the particular governmental institutions, processes, policies, and political behavior found in the United States of America.  It is designed for students who want to pursue careers in Federal, State, or local governmental agencies, public administration, military service, non-profits, think tanks, elections campaigns, elected office, or academia.  Students are advised to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree with its extra emphasis on quantitative analytical skills or to pursue a Bachelor of Arts degree with 14 units of training in Spanish (the USA’s second most spoken language).

Comparative Politics / International Relations concentration

The Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with a concentration in Comparative Politics / International Relations provides students with a strong foundation in both the differences between sovereign governments and political behavior throughout the world as well as the interaction of those different sovereign governments and political communities.   Those students interested in the politics of a particular area of the world are advised to pursue a Bachelor of Arts degree with 14 units of training in a relevant foreign language.  Some foreign languages are offered on campus in Stephenville, and many more can be taken via the A&M system's many study abroad opportunities on various university campuses throughout the world.  Those students interested in the analysis of an international political dynamic or issue, however, should consider a Bachelor of Science with its extra emphasis on quantitative analytical skills.

Social Studies Composite Certification / Option 4

The Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with focus on teacher certification in Social Studies prepares students to teach government, history, economics, and geography in secondary public schools in Texas.  It includes a highly structured sequence of courses that provides the pedagogical and professional training needed for certification.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science

Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
ENGL 1301 [shared] Composition I
ENGL 1302 [shared] Composition II
HIST 1301 [shared] United States History I
HIST 1302 [shared] United States History II
GOVT 2305 [shared] Federal Government (Federal Constitution and Topics)
GOVT 2306 [shared] Texas Government (Texas Constitution and Topics)
POLS 2304Introduction to Political Science3
POLS 3311Political Philosophy I3
POLS 3308International Politics3
SOCI 3330Social Science Statistics3
POLS 3312Political Philosophy II3
POLS 3314Comparative Politics3
POLS 3316Political Science Research Methods3
POLS 4390Political Science Capstone Course3
Foreign Language 1411, 1412, 2311, 231214
Total Hours80
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
American Politics
American Politics Advanced Electives15
Elections and Political Parties
Comparative State and Local Government and Politics
The Executive
Legislation
The Judiciary
Public Administration
Environmental Politics
Constitutional Law I
Constitutional Law II
Religion and Politics
Foreign Policy
US Public Policy
Administration of Justice
Political Science Seminar
Problems
Internship
Political Science Advanced Electives6
Electives16
Advanced Elective3
Total Hours40
Comparative Politics/International Relations
Comparative Politics/International Relations Advanced Electives15
Political Economy of Globalization
Terrorism and Political Violence
European Politics
Nationalism
Politics of Latin America
Politics of the Middle East
International Environmental Issues
Religion and Politics
Governments and Politics of East and South Asia
African Politics
Foreign Policy
Conflict Studies
Peace Studies
Weapons of Mass Destruction
Civil Wars and Military Intervention
Political Science Seminar
Internship
Problems
Political Science Advanced Electives6
Electives16
Advanced Elective3
Total Hours40
Social Studies Composite Certification/Option 4
General Education MATH requirement [shared]:
College Algebra
Contemporary Mathematics I
Math for Business & Social Sciences I (Finite Mathematics)
Elementary Statistical Methods
Precalculus Math
Calculus I
HIST 3304History of Texas3
HIST 3340Historical Methods3
GEOG 1303World Regional Geography3
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Human Geography
Economic Geography
ECON 2301 [shared] Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 2302Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON Elective3
Sophomore Literature [shared]
EDUC 3321Foundations of Teaching: Middle and Secondary Classrooms3
EDUC 4331Instructional Strategies for Middle and Secondary Classrooms3
EDUC 4335 Issues of Professionalism3
EDSP 4361Teaching Strategies for Adolescent Students with Learning Disabilities3
EDUC 4690Clinical Teaching6
Select one of the following:3
Child Psychology
Educational Psychology
Child Development
READ 3351Content Area Literacy3
Total Hours42

For more information, contact Dr. Nathaniel Cogley at cogley@tarleton.edu.


The Bachelor of Science Degree in Political Science

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 143
ENGL 1301 [shared] Composition I
ENGL 1302 [shared] Composition II
HIST 1301 [shared] United States History I
HIST 1302 [shared] United States History II
GOVT 2305 [shared] Federal Government (Federal Constitution and Topics)
GOVT 2306 [shared] Texas Government (Texas Constitution and Topics)
MATH 2412 [shared] Precalculus Math
POLS 2304Introduction to Political Science3
POLS 3311Political Philosophy I3
SOCI 3330Social Science Statistics3
POLS 3314Comparative Politics3
POLS 3312Political Philosophy II3
POLS 3308International Politics3
POLS 3316Political Science Research Methods3
POLS 4390Political Science Capstone Course3
Mathematics Requirements
MATH 2413Calculus I4
MATH 2414Calculus II4
MATH 3311Probability and Statistics I3
MATH 4311Probability and Statistics II3
Total Hours81
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Social Studies Composite Certification/Option 4
HIST 3304History of Texas3
HIST 3340Historical Methods3
GEOG 1303World Regional Geography3
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Human Geography
Economic Geography
ECON 2301 [shared] Principles of Macroeconomics 2
ECON 2302Principles of Microeconomics3
ECON Elective3
Sophomore Literature [shared]
EDUC 3321Foundations of Teaching: Middle and Secondary Classrooms3
EDUC 4331Instructional Strategies for Middle and Secondary Classrooms3
EDUC 4335 Issues of Professionalism3
EDSP 4361Teaching Strategies for Adolescent Students with Learning Disabilities3
EDUC 4690Clinical Teaching6
Select one of the following:3
Child Psychology
Educational Psychology
Child Development
READ 3351Content Area Literacy3
Total Hours42
American Politics
American Politics Advanced Electives15
Elections and Political Parties
Comparative State and Local Government and Politics
The Executive
Legislation
The Judiciary
Public Administration
Environmental Politics
Constitutional Law I
Constitutional Law II
Religion and Politics
Foreign Policy
US Public Policy
Administration of Justice
Political Science Seminar
Internship
Problems
Political Science Advanced Electives3
Electives 21
Total Hours39
Comparative Politics/International Relations
Comparative Politics/International Relations Advanced Electives15
Political Economy of Globalization
Terrorism and Political Violence
European Politics
Nationalism
Politics of Latin America
Politics of the Middle East
International Environmental Issues
Religion and Politics
Governments and Politics of East and South Asia
African Politics
Foreign Policy
Conflict Studies
Peace Studies
Weapons of Mass Destruction
Civil Wars and Military Intervention
Internship
Problems
Political Science Seminar
Political Science Advanced Electives3
Electives 21
Total Hours39

For more information, contact Dr. Nathaniel Cogley at cogley@tarleton.edu.


The department also offers a minor in Political Science for students with a different major program of study.  A minor in Political Science can compliment many types of majors with additional knowledge about the ways in which governments and political processes affect such subjects.  Students can also develop valuable analytical skills and enhance their abilities to be knowledgable and politically engaged citizens at the local, State, and Federal levels.

Minor in Political Science

Required Courses
GOVT 2305Federal Government (Federal Constitution and Topics)3
GOVT 2306Texas Government (Texas Constitution and Topics)3
Advanced Electives in Political Science12
Total Hours18

For more information, contact Dr. Nathaniel Cogley at cogley@tarleton.edu.


Legal Studies

The department offers a program of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in Legal Studies.  It is designed for students who want to work in the legal profession or in fields that require a deeper understanding of our legal system.  As a result, this program is oriented around the critical job functions of competent and ethical professionals working in the legal services industry. Each course has been strategically selected and designed to deliver the knowledge, skills, and values necessary to enter the workforce upon graduation or to continue studies in graduate or law school.

Public Law concentration

Admission to law school is based primarily upon a student’s performance on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and cumulative grade point average, and students may be admitted with any undergraduate major.  However, the Public Law concentration provides a broad-based, interdisciplinary curriculum designed to develop logical reasoning, rhetoric, analysis, critical thinking, and writing skills, which are critical for students planning to pursue continuing studies in law or other graduate areas.  

Paralegal Studies concentration

The Paralegal concentration is designed for students who have logical and analytical minds, possess organizational skills, and thrive on attention to detail.  Paralegals may not provide legal services directly to the public, except as permitted by law; however, working as part of a legal team under the supervision of an attorney, paralegals perform tasks vital to the success of a case, including drafting legal documents, interviewing witnesses and clients, preparing trial exhibits, and analyzing documents.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Legal Studies

Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
ENGL 1301 [shared] [WI] Composition I
ENGL 1302 [shared] [WI] Composition II
Sophomore Literature [shared]
COMM 1315 [shared] Public Speaking
HIST 1301 [shared] United States History I
HIST 1302 [shared] United States History II
GOVT 2305 [shared] Federal Government (Federal Constitution and Topics)
GOVT 2306 [shared] Texas Government (Texas Constitution and Topics)
PHIL 2303 [shared] Introduction to Logic
ENGL 3309 [WI] Technical writing and Document Design3
ENGL 3310 [WI] Technical Writing and Editing3
LEGL 3330Fundamentals of Jurisprudence3
LEGL 3331Legal History3
LEGL 4385Legal Studies Seminar3
POLS 3309The Judiciary3
POLS 4301 [WI] Constitutional Law I3
POLS 4302 [WI] Constitutional Law II3
Foreign Language 1411, 1412, 2311, 231214
Total Hours80
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Public Law Concentration
POLS 3302Elections and Political Parties3
POLS 3304The Executive3
POLS 3305Legislation3
POLS 3311Political Philosophy I3
POLS 3312Political Philosophy II3
LEGL 4390Legal Studies Capstone Course3
Electives (3 hours advanced)22
Total Hours40
Paralegal Studies Concentration
LEGL 4330Legal Research and Writing3
LEGL 4331Law Office Management3
LEGL 4386Problems: Paralegal Specializations 19
LEGL 4084Paralegal Internship3
Electives (9 hours advanced)22
Total Hours40
1

LEGL 4386 Problems: Paralegal Specializations must be repeated until the 9-hour requirement is fulfilled.

For more information, contact Dr. Amy O'Dell at odell@tarleton.edu.


The department also offers a minor in Legal Studies for students with a different major program of study.  The minor in Legal Studies can add value to your degree by 1) supplementing studies in another discipline such as business or criminal justice, 2) providing an introduction to the skills and knowledge needed in law school, and 3) enhancing your understanding about legal issues that impact our nation, state, and communities.

Minor in Legal Studies

Required Courses
POLS 4301 [WI] Constitutional Law I3
POLS 4302 [WI] Constitutional Law II3
POLS 3309The Judiciary3
LEGL 3330Fundamentals of Jurisprudence3
LEGL 3331Legal History3
Advanced LEGL Elective3
Total Hours18

For more information, contact Dr. Amy O'Dell at odell@tarleton.edu.


International Studies

The department offers a program of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies. The Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies is designed for students who seek an interdisciplinary social science training in either a geographic area of the world or a pervasive global issue.  Students take relevant courses in a variety of social science disciplines, including history, political science, sociology, geography, and philosophy.  Students also complete foreign language coursework relevant to their regional interests.  Some foreign languages are offered on campus in Stephenville, and many more can be taken via the A&M system's many study abroad opportunities on various university campuses throughout the world.  The major program also allows students to efficiently incorporate a minor program of their choice into their undergraduate studies and engage in study abroad opportunities in preparation for a variety of exciting career opportunities.

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in International Studies

Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
Foreign Language: 1411, 1412, 2311, 231214
Program requires 6 hours of the 120 hours needed to graduate to be completed as part of a study abroad program
Major Requirements
GEOG 1303 [shared] World Regional Geography
GOVT 2305 [shared] Federal Government (Federal Constitution and Topics)
GOVT 2306 [shared] Texas Government (Texas Constitution and Topics)
HIST 1301 [shared] United States History I
HIST 1302 [shared] United States History II
HIST 4331World Since 19193
POLS 3308International Politics3
INTL 4390International Studies Capstone3
Select one:3
Economic Geography
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Select one:3
World Religions
World Religions
Select one:3
Political Economy of Globalization
Comparative Politics
International Environmental Issues
Select one:3
Political Science Research Methods
Methods of Social Research
Select one:3
Social Stratification and Inequality
Globalization 1
Migration and Society
History Elective (Choose one)3
British History from 1603 to Modern Times
Latin America After Independence
History of Mexico
United States and the World
National Histories
European Intellectual and Cultural History
Any Advanced HIST course offered via study abroad
Political Science Elective (Choose two)6
Political Economy of Globalization
Terrorism and Political Violence
Comparative Politics
European Politics
Nationalism
Politics of Latin America
Politics of the Middle East
Governments and Politics of East and South Asia
African Politics
International Environmental Issues
Foreign Policy
Political Science Seminar
Any Advanced POLS course offered via study abroad
Social Science Elective (Choose two)6
Geography of Latin America
Intro to Travel, Cultural Experience, & Study Abroad
British History from 1603 to Modern Times
Latin America After Independence
History of Mexico
United States and the World
National Histories
European Intellectual and Cultural History
Social Science Statistics
Globalization
Sociology of Contemporary Japan
Sociology of Foreign Culture
Migration and Society
Any Advanced GEOG, HIST, PHIL, or SOCI course offered via study abroad
Non-Social Science Elective (Choose one) *3
Mexican Agricultural Relations
International Trade and Agriculture
Introduction to International Business
International Business Law
Homeland Security
International Economics
Cultural Studies
International Management
Global Management Practices
International Marketing
International Social Work
Human Rights
Survey of Spanish-America Literature
The Caribbean Experience
Culture and Civilization of Spain and Latin America
Southern African Ecology and Culture
Study Abroad
Any Advanced course offered via study abroad
General Electives4
Minor (Required) 218
Total Hours120

For more information, contact Dr. Nathaniel Cogley at cogley@tarleton.edu.


The department also offers a minor in International Studies for students with a different major program of study.  The minor in International Studies offers students an opportunity to couple their major program of study with an interdisciplinary understanding of foreign regions and global issues.  It is ideal for students who intend to seek career opportunities abroad or to gain a better understanding of the world while here at Tarleton State University.

Minor in International Studies

Required Courses
Select four:12
Economic Geography
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
World Since 1919
International Studies Capstone
World Religions
Political Economy of Globalization
International Politics
Comparative Politics
Political Science Research Methods
International Environmental Issues
Social Stratification and Inequality
Methods of Social Research
Globalization
Migration and Society
Select two:6
International Trade and Agriculture
Mexican Agricultural Relations
International Business Law
Introduction to International Business
Homeland Security
International Economics
Cultural Studies
Geography of Latin America
Intro to Travel, Cultural Experience, & Study Abroad
British History from 1603 to Modern Times
Latin America After Independence
History of Mexico
United States and the World
National Histories
European Intellectual and Cultural History
International Management
Global Management Practices
International Marketing
Terrorism and Political Violence
European Politics
Nationalism
Politics of Latin America
Politics of the Middle East
Governments and Politics of East and South Asia
African Politics
Foreign Policy
Political Science Seminar
Social Science Statistics
Sociology of Contemporary Japan
Sociology of Foreign Culture
International Social Work
Human Rights
Survey of Spanish-America Literature
The Caribbean Experience
Culture and Civilization of Spain and Latin America
Southern African Ecology and Culture
Study Abroad
Any courses offered via study abroad
Total Hours18

For more information, contact Dr. Nathaniel Cogley at cogley@tarleton.edu.


Philosophy

The department also offers a minor in Philosophy.  The minor in Philosophy is designed for students who want to supplement their degree program with a program that develops breadth of understanding and clarity of thought. Philosophy courses foster improved analysis and problem solving skills. It teaches clear writing and trains students to ask the right questions. This minor makes an excellent supplement for students interested in the humanities, as well as the professions, such as law, medicine, military service and pastoral ministry.

Minor in Philosophy

Required Courses
PHIL 1301Introduction to Philosophy3
PHIL 2303Introduction to Logic3
Choose 12 hours from the following (6 hours must be advanced):12
Ethics in the Professions
World Religions
History of Christianity and Christian Thought to the Reformation
Political Philosophy I
Political Philosophy II
Problems in Philosophy
Environmental Ethics
Philosophy Seminar
Total Hours18

For more information, contact Dr. Matthew Hallgarth at hallgarth@tarleton.edu.


Public Policy

The department also offers a minor in Public Policy.  The minor in Public Policy is for students who are interested in the public policy facets of their chosen major, prospective vocation, and career.  Students have access to a wide-range of policy and policy-related courses taught across all colleges and programs at Tarleton State University.

Minor in Public Policy

Required Courses
POLS 4340US Public Policy3
Elective Options (9 advanced hours required) 115
Criminal Justice
Correctional Systems and Practices
Juvenile Delinquency
Comparative Criminal Justice
Community Corrections
Homeland Security
Crime, Justice, and Social Diversity
Social Work
Social Welfare in America
Social Welfare Policy
Social Work with Aging Populations
International Social Work
Child Welfare
Human Rights
Death and Dying
Women's Issues
Political Science
Environmental Politics
Terrorism and Political Violence
International Environmental Issues
Environmental Law
Religion and Politics
Foreign Policy
Weapons of Mass Destruction
Civil Wars and Military Intervention
Administration of Justice
Economics
Money And Banking
Environmental Economics
Economics of Financial Markets
Political Economy
International Economics
Sociology
Race and Ethnic Relations
Criminology
Rural Sociology
Social Stratification and Inequality
Gender in Society
Medical and Health Care Policy
Age and Ethnic Stratification
Migration and Society
Business
Employee and Labor Relations
Business Law I
Business Law II
Employment Law
International Business Law
Communications
Communication Law
Agriculture
Public Agricultural Food Programs
International Trade and Agriculture
Commodity Futures Markets
Recreation and Tourism Economics
Formulation of Agriculture & Food Policy
Mexican Agricultural Relations
Principles of Wildlife Conservation and Management
Sustainability
Population, Pollution, and Resource Depletion
Fish and Wildlife Laws and Administration
Water Resources Policy and Management
Public Health
Introduction to Health Management and Policy
Public Health Law
Nursing
Policy, Politics, and Ethics
Engineering
Occupational Safety and Health
Education
Policies and Ethical Standards
Total Hours18

For more information, contact Dr. Nathaniel Cogley at cogley@tarleton.edu.


Environmental Policy

The department also offers a certificate in Environmental Policy.  This certificate will help students establish their readiness to work in jobs dealing with environmental law and policy, including advocacy.  It also allows students to develop their own worldview and ethics relating to environmental sustainability.

Certificate in Environmental Policy

Required Courses
ECON 3304Environmental Economics3
POLS 3310Environmental Politics3
GEOL 1407Introduction to Environmental Science4
Choose one of the following electives:3
Environmental Communication
Environmental Ethics
International Environmental Issues
Environmental Law
Environmental Sociology
Water Policy
Total Hours13

For more information, contact Dr. Anne Egelston at egelston@tarleton.edu.

Government Courses

GOVT 2305. Federal Government (Federal Constitution and Topics). 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the American national governmental system. This course with POLS 202 satisfies the legal requirement for graduation from state colleges and universities.

GOVT 2306. Texas Government (Texas Constitution and Topics). 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the constitution of the state of Texas and of the state and local governmental units created by the constitution. This course satisfies the TEA requirement for out-of-state teacher certification and, when taken with GOVT 2305, the legal requirement for graduation from state colleges and universities.

International Studies Courses

INTL 4390. International Studies Capstone. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course requires students to integrate and use fundamental concepts learned in previous program courses to research and analyze real-world phenomena and issues. Students will conduct research and present a final project that will integrate discipline related methods with developed writing and presentation skills. The project will be coordinated with the minor and will be supervised by faculty in International Studies and the minor.

Legal Studies Courses

LEGL 3330. Fundamentals of Jurisprudence. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Study of the dependence of the law on the political regime. Review of classical and modern conceptions with emphasis on the modern. Prerequisite: GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306.

LEGL 3331. Legal History. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to the Anglo-American legal tradition. Particular attention paid to legal documents such as Magna Carta, The English Bill of Rights, and the Organic Laws of the United States, and jurists such as Blackstone, Marshall, and Holmes. Prerequisite: GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306.

LEGL 4084. Paralegal Internship. 3-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3-6 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Application of legal studies education to a paralegal studies internship, which must be successfully completed before graduation. Prerequisite: LEGL 4330, LEGL 4331.

LEGL 4330. Legal Research and Writing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to legal research and writing. Emphasis on legal sources, case analysis, and legal citation. Prerequisite: LEGL 3330, LEGL 3331, POLS 3309.

LEGL 4331. Law Office Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to law office management. Emphasis on law office organization, accounting, and legal computing programs. Prerequisite: LEGL 3330, LEGL 3331, LEGL 4330.

LEGL 4385. Legal Studies Seminar. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Specialized legal studies course on topics such as natural law, legal positivism, or Roman constitutionalism. May be taken more than once as topics will vary. Prerequisite: POLS 3309, LEGL 3330 or permission of program coordinator.

LEGL 4386. Problems: Paralegal Specializations. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Specialized paralegal course on topics such as probate, real estate, or litigation. Prerequisite: LEGL 4330, LEGL 4331 or permission of program coordinator.

LEGL 4390. Legal Studies Capstone Course. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Application of legal studies education to a final scholarly paper, which must be successfully defended before graduation. Senior status or permission of program coordinator. Prerequisite: LEGL 3330, LEGL 3331, POLS 3309, POLS 4301, POLS 4302.

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 1301. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the writings of major philosophical authors.

PHIL 2303. Introduction to Logic. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will introduce the student to the basic principles and concepts of formal logic, formal and informal fallacies, deductive and inductive reasoning, truth tables, symbolic notation, Venn diagrams, and the logic of scientific method. It will also include consideration of the philosophical foundations of logic.

PHIL 3301. Ethics in the Professions. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will consider both the responsibilities inherent in a profession as such and some of the specific ethical dilemmas that arise in particular professions: business, science, engineering, military, education, medicine, etc. Prerequisite: Junior classification.

PHIL 3304. World Religions. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the philosophical, ethical, and social dimensions of the religions of the world. Focuses on major religions but lesser known ones may be included. The course will emphasize the diversity of religious experience and traditions. Credit for both PHIL 3304 and RELI 3304 will not be awarded.

PHIL 3309. History of Christianity and Christian Thought to the Reformation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An overview of the history of Christianity and Christian thought from founding to the beginnings of the Reformation with particular attention to major themes, movements, events, leaders, and developments within their social, cultural and political contexts. The course also offers an introduction to the central ideas and debates that have shaped the historical development of Christian theologies, practices, and institutions. Credit for PHIL, RELI, and HIST 3309 will not be awarded.

PHIL 3311. Political Philosophy I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Philosophical ideas concerning basic political problems from the Classical Period through the Renaissance. Credit for both PHIL 3311 and POLS 3311 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: PHIL 1301 (Philosophy minor), POLS 2304 (Political Science majors), GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306 or approval of department head for Political Science majors.

PHIL 3312. Political Philosophy II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Philosophical ideas concerning basic political problems since the Early Modern period. Credit for both PHIL 3311 and POLS 3312 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: PHIL 1301 (Philosophy minor), POLS 2304 (Political Science majors), GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306 or approval of department head for Political Science majors.

PHIL 4086. Problems in Philosophy. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

Independent reading, research, and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with the instructor and department head.

PHIL 4305. Environmental Ethics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An inquiry into how humans ought to relate to nature, including questions about the moral standing of animals and other non-human beings, environmental justice, and what we may owe to future generations. In addition to exploring universal ethical issues concerning our relationships with the environment, the course will also consider exemplary American and Texan nature writers.

PHIL 4385. Philosophy Seminar. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of major philosophical issues and theories. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Junior classification or approval of department head.

Political Science Courses

POLS 2304. Introduction to Political Science. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to the discipline of political science, with particular emphasis devoted to its development in the modern era. Topics include degree concentrations available in the program, types of political institutions, uses of political science, participation by political scientists in public affairs and public policy, an introduction to research and writing in the discipline, political theory and other discipline theories, and career options available to political science majors. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 or GOVT 2306 or approval of the department head.

POLS 3301. Political Economy of Globalization. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This class introduces students to the political system that manages the global economy. The class looks at theoretical approaches to economic conflict and cooperation, global trade, and global finance. Students will also study problems associated with the global economic system including poverty, inequality, and environmental externalities.

POLS 3302. Elections and Political Parties. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the electoral process in American national, state, and local political systems. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of the structure and functions of political parties, interest groups, the news media, and other participants in the electoral process. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305, 2306.

POLS 3303. Comparative State and Local Government and Politics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Variations and similarities in the practice of politics and in the administration of government in the states. Particular attention is given to local government and state-national relations. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305, 2306.

POLS 3304. The Executive. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the organization of executive power in American national, state, and local systems. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of the structure and functions of the Presidency of the United States and national, state, and local bureaucracies, and the role of parties, legislatures, courts, interest groups, and other participants in the executive process. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305, 2306.

POLS 3305. Legislation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the legislative process in American national, state, and local political systems. Emphasis will placed on the evolution of the structure and functions of the Congress and the state legislatures, and the role of executives, courts, parties, interest groups, and other participants in the legislative process. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305, 2306.

POLS 3307. Public Administration. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of the concepts and practices of American public administration. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305, 2306.

POLS 3308. International Politics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course introduces students to concepts and theories of international politics. It covers the evolution of the contemporary nation-state system, the role of international governmental institutions, and conflict and cooperation among states. Prerequisite: GOVT 2305, 2306.

POLS 3309. The Judiciary. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the organization of the judiciary in American national, state, and local systems. Emphasis will be placed on the structure and function of the courts, plus the roles of the executive and legislative branches in selecting judges and checking the power of the courts, and the roles played by interest groups and others in influencing the courts. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and 2306.

POLS 3310. Environmental Politics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An introduction to the politics of environmental protection in America. The focus of the course is upon domestic environmental policy with particular attention paid to traditional media - air, water, and hazardous waste. Prerequisite: GOVT 2305, 2306.

POLS 3311. Political Philosophy I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Philosophical ideas concerning basic political problems from the Classical period to the Renaissance. Credit for both PHIL 3311 and POLS 3311 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306, and POLS 2304 or with approval of department head.

POLS 3312. Political Philosophy II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Philosophical ideas concerning basic political problems since the Early Modern period. Credit for both PHIL 3312 and POLS 3312 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306, POLS 2304 or department head approval.

POLS 3314. Comparative Politics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course introduces students to the politics of several nations in Europe, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle east. The course focuses on the analysis of major political developments in the post- World War II era leading to the present. Topics discussed include: the legacy of the past, governing structures and processes, and contemporary political debates. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306. Political Science majors are also required to take POLS 2304.

POLS 3315. Sustainability. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Explore the varied perspectives of sustainability and analyze factors that contribute to or decrease system sustainability. Investigation of the social, economic, and environmental barriers to achieving sustainable systems and options for overcoming these barriers. Credit will be awarded only for POLS 3315, ENVS 3315, or WSES 3315.

POLS 3316. Political Science Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course introduces students to the process of conducting research in the social sciences. Material will focus on developing research questions and extrapolating hypotheses from them, correctly and accurately reviewing prior relevant literature and how/when to cite it, applying qualitative and quantitative methods, finding sources of data and developing a case study, understanding the IRB process, and preparing a research proposal that can be reviewed and refined in preparation for a Capstone project. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306, POLS 2304.

POLS 3320. Terrorism and Political Violence. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the causes of terrorism and other forms of political violence, with particular emphasis on measures of prevention and counter-terrorism.

POLS 4084. Internship. 3-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 16-30 Hours).

Application and integration of academic study and development of skills in a field setting. Field projects include direction of a political campaign, internship in a city or county administrative office, or in a not-for-profit organization for analyzing or carrying out governmental policy. Minimum of 200 hours of work required for 3 hours of credit. Prerequisites: 2.5 overall grade point average, advanced standing, and approval of department head. Field experience fee $50.

POLS 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

Independent reading, research and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with the political science counselor.

POLS 4301. Constitutional Law I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

The origin and growth of the constitutional aspects of national power as shown by leading U.S. Supreme Court decisions on commerce, federalism, jurisdiction, money, monopolies, treaties, and war. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305, 2306, HIST 1301, 1302.

POLS 4302. Constitutional Law II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

The origin and development of constitutional prohibitions as shown by leading U.S. Supreme Court decisions on civil rights, contracts, due process, economic regulation, eminent domain, labor relations, obscenity, political utterance, and religion. Prerequisite: POLS 4301.

POLS 4306. European Politics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Comparative examination of European politics and government, with particular attention to the European Union and policy processes at the nation-state and EU levels. This course may be conducted either as a regular seminar on campus or as part of a study-abroad opportunity. Students who take the course on campus may repeat it once for credit as a study-abroad opportunity, or vice versa.

POLS 4307. Nationalism. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Examination of theories of nationalism and national identity, origins of ethno-centric conflict, and impacts of national identity on political issues.

POLS 4308. Politics of Latin America. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides an analysis of contemporary political issues, economic development, militarism, and democratization in Latin America. In attempting to explain these phenomena, the course will focus on the shaping influences of such key factors as religion, gender, race, ethnicity, and the impact of external powers in shaping political events in the region. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and GOVT 2306.

POLS 4309. Politics of the Middle East. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course focuses on the history and politics of the Middle East in the 20th century. Specifically, this course will analyze such critical political, social, intellectual, and economic themes as colonialism, Arab nationalism, secular modernism, military conflict, the rise of political Islam, the status of women, and the oil revolution. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and GOVT 2306.

POLS 4310. International Environmental Issues. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An introduction to environmental politics and policy at the international level. The focus of this course is upon global environmental policy with particular attention paid to the processes that create and shape global environmental policy. Prerequisite: GOVT 2305, 2306.

POLS 4311. Environmental Law. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Focuses on US environmental law and regulations including administrative law and common law. Major laws dealing with air, water, and hazardous waste will be assessed, including citizen participation within the legal process Prerequisite: GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306.

POLS 4312. Religion and Politics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An examination of the major theories of the relationship of religion and politics and a survey of this relationship in the United States with a focus on religious liberty, church-state relations, and religious advocacy. Additional focus on Christian-majority states in Europe and the Americas and Muslim-majority states and the relationship of Islam and government, as well as critical contemporary issues. Students cannot receive credit for both POLS 4312 and RELI 4312. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and GOVT 2306.

POLS 4313. Governments and Politics of East and South Asia. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Government organization and functions, political processes, and major developments in the political systems of Japan, China, Korea, India, Pakistan, and other states in East and South Asia from the 20th century to the present. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and GOVT 2306.

POLS 4314. African Politics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course introduces students to the major political issues and dynamics in sub-Saharan Africa, including traditional political systems, the effects of colonialism, political culture, public policy, the role of the military, domestic conflict, corruption, institutionalization, democratization, development, foreign aid, and regional integration. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status or permission of the department head.

POLS 4315. Foreign Policy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of America's role in the modern world. Particular emphasis is placed on the policy makers, for example, the President, Congress, the State Department, and the Department of Defense, and on external factors such as other nations. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305, 2306.

POLS 4316. Conflict Studies. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the causes of international and civil conflict, historical changes in the nature of war, and predictions of future conflicts.

POLS 4317. Peace Studies. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A seminar on the causes of peace, covering bargaining and war termination, social conflict resolution, international cooperation, and the ethics of peace.

POLS 4320. Weapons of Mass Destruction. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Examines the physical and political effects of chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons, with emphasis on issues of deterrence and arms control.

POLS 4321. Civil Wars and Military Intervention. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the causes, characteristics, and effects of civil wars, with particular emphasis on preventing the resumption of warfare after peace agreements. The effect of military intervention on the outcome and recurrence of civil war is studied in detail.

POLS 4340. US Public Policy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides an overview of the development of public policy in the United States and offers students the opportunity to understand this process in relation to their research interests. A major research project on a specific policy issue is developed over the course of the term. Credit will not be awarded for both POLS 4340 and POLS 5340. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and GOVT 2306.

POLS 4380. Administration of Justice. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Analyzes the structure, function, and interrelationship of the components of the criminal justice system at the federal, state, and local levels. The history and philosophy of criminal justice in a democratic society will be included.

POLS 4385. Political Science Seminar. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Independent reading, research, discussion, and paper writing, under personal direction of instructor. Prerequisites: Senior classification, 18 hours POLS, or approval of department head. May be taken more than once for credit.

POLS 4390. Political Science Capstone Course. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course requires students to integrate and use fundamental concepts learned in previous political science courses to research and analyze real-world political phenomena and problems. Students will present oral and written reports on their research, supplemented by appropriate internet and multimedia materials, as well as portfolios documenting their research. Prerequisite: SOCI 4302 or POLS 3316 or Senior status or permission of the department head.

Religious Studies Courses

RELI 1301. Survey of the Old Testament. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of the historical background and basic teachings of the Old Testament and its influence in the ancient world.

RELI 1302. Survey of the New Testament. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of the historical background and basic teachings of the New Testament and its influence in the ancient world.

RELI 3304. World Religions. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the philosophical, ethical, and social dimensions of the religions of the world. Focuses on major religions but lesser known ones may be included. The course will emphasize the diversity of religious experience and traditions. Credit for both PHIL 3304 and RELI 3304 will not be awarded.

RELI 3309. History of Christianity and Christian Thought to the Reformation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An overview of the history of Christianity and Christian thought from founding to the beginnings of the Reformation with particular attention to major themes, movements, events, leaders, and developments within their social, cultural and political contexts. The course also offers an introduction to the central ideas and debates that have shaped the historical development of Christian theologies, practices, and institutions. Credit will not be awarded for more than one of the following courses: PHIL 3309, HIST 3309, and RELI 3309.

RELI 4312. Religion and Politics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An examination of the major theories of the relationship of religion and politics and a survey of this relationship in the United States with a focus on religious liberty, church-state relations, and religious advocacy. Additional focus on Christian-majority states in Europe and the Americas and Muslim-majority states and the relationship of Islam and government, as well as critical contemporary issues. Students cannot receive credit for both POLS 4312 and RELI 4312. Prerequisites: GOVT 2305 and GOVT 2306.

Department of Government, Legal Studies, and Philosophy
Tarleton State University
Box T-0685
Stephenville, Texas USA 76402
(254) 968-9021
(254) 968-9784
glsp@tarleton.edu
tarleton.edu/glsp

Department Head

  • Cogley, Dr. Nathaniel

Professors

  • Clifford, Dr. Craig
  • Cross, Dr. Malcolm
  • Margolis, Dr. Larry

Associate professors

  • Hallgarth, Dr. Matthew
  • Morrow, Dr. Eric
  • Velasco, Dr. Jesus

Assistant professors

  • Aho, Dr. Karl
  • Egelston, Dr. Anne
  • Newton, Dr. Benjamin
  • O'Dell, Dr. Amy

Instructor

  • Reynolds, Dr. Marcie
  • Thompson, Dr. Casey

Visiting Instructor

  • Kabala, Dr. Boleslaw

Adjunct Instructor

  • Jasieniecki, Ms. Carol
  • Nicholas, Mr. Marc
  • Ruiz, Mr. Richard
  • Snyder, Mr. Gregory