History, Sociology, Geography and GIS

Department website: https://www.tarleton.edu/hsgg/index.html

The Department of History, Sociology, Geography and GIS is dedicated to preparing its majors for a variety of careers in the rapidly growing job market. We establish a firm foundation of knowledge and understanding that prepares students for the industry, academia, administrative and policy positions in the government at all levels, and helping all students to become knowledgeable and productive citizens and leaders in their communities through the Core Curriculum and our upper level offerings. Our mission is achieved through the coordination of the disciplines in the department.

History 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in History offers courses with a variety of topics taught by exceptional faculty. The degree provides students with exciting opportunities to explore how historians investigate, analyze, and write about history. The focus is on critical thinking and writing, as history is about solving problems, investigating mysteries, and writing clearly and persuasively. The skills gained in this program can be applied in nearly any career. The strength of this program is evident in the quality of students and faculty. From scholarly publications with major presses to excellence in the classroom, the program faculty offers a wide range of specializations, quality instruction, and mentoring in research, and conference presentations. Students have opportunities to engage in many activities from research and presentations related to courses, study abroad and away programs, campus student organizations, internships, area opportunities in local and public history, and much more.

Sociology 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Sociology provides students with the opportunity to become experts in understanding society and the interactions of individuals through a variety of courses taught by exceptional faculty. The focus is on understanding social events. Students that major in this program will receive a well-rounded liberal arts education, learn the basics of research, communicate effectively verbally and in writing, and will be qualified candidates for jobs in businesses and with the government.

Geography and GIS

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Geography and GIS provides students with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and develop technical skills that are needed in every sector of the economy, from agricultural production, to natural resource management, to oil exploration, to facility management, to manufacturing, to urban planning, to retail location, to gathering census data, to space exploration. The department also offers a Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences in GIS, which caters to the needs of nontraditional students with existing military, technical or vocational credits in some aspects of GIS. The BAAS in GIS is offered only online and on the Fort Worth campus. Students who major in this discipline will learn how to use computers, with the aid of powerful and very sophisticated software and other related tools to gather, store, analyze and display spatial/geographic/locational data. Graduates in this field will be able to work across a variety of disciplines. This programs places a lot of emphasis on hands-on and students will learn from a variety of exceptional faculty.   

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in History

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 142
ENGL 1301 [shared] [WI] Composition I
ENGL 1302 [shared] [WI] Composition II
Sophomore English [shared]
Choose one of the following [shared]:
College Algebra
Math for Business & Social Sciences I (Finite Mathematics)
Contemporary Mathematics I
Elementary Statistical Methods
Precalculus Math
Calculus I
HIST 2321World Civilizations I3
HIST 2322World Civilizations II3
HIST 3340 [WI] Historical Methods3
HIST 4390 [WI] History Capstone3
Select 1 of the following Writing Intensive courses:3
Colonial North America
A Nation Divided, 1815-1860
Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1929
The Renaissance and Reformation
Europe in the Age of Absolutism
History of Mexico
United States and the World
Ideas in Action: American Social Thought from the Progressive Era to the Present
Research in American Political History since 1929
Social History of the United States Before 1865
Europe 1850-1919
World Since 1919
Advanced HIST6
Foreign Language 1411, 1412, 2311, 231214
Total Hours77
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
Without Teacher Certification
Advanced HIST9
Advanced POLS6
Select one of the following:3
Introduction To Economics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Cultural Anthropology
Introductory Sociology
Race and Ethnic Relations
World Regional Geography
Introduction to Human Geography
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Philosophy
Introduction to Logic
Ethics in the Professions
Philosophy Seminar
Survey of the Old Testament
Survey of the New Testament
World Religions
Advanced Hours from ARTS, CRIJ, COMM, ENGL, MUSI, POLS, RELI, SOCI, SOCW, THEA9
Electives (9 Hours Advanced) 213
Total Hours43
Secondary Certification/Option 1
HIST 3304History of Texas3
READ 3351Content Area Literacy3
EDUC 3321Foundations of Teaching: Middle and Secondary Classrooms3
EDUC 4331Instructional Strategies for Middle and Secondary Classrooms3
EDSP 4361Teaching Strategies for Adolescent Students with Learning Disabilities3
EDUC 4335 Issues of Professionalism3
EDUC 4690Clinical Teaching6
Advanced HIST6
Advanced POLS6
Select one of the following:3
Introduction To Economics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Cultural Anthropology
Introductory Sociology
Race and Ethnic Relations
World Regional Geography
Introduction to Human Geography
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Philosophy
Introduction to Logic
Ethics in the Professions
Philosophy Seminar
Survey of the Old Testament
Survey of the New Testament
World Religions
Select one of the following:3
Child Psychology
Educational Psychology
Child Development
Total Hours45
Social Studies Composite Certification/Option 4
HIST 3304History of Texas3
Advanced POLS6
GEOG 1303World Regional Geography3
ECON 2301Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON 2302Principles of Microeconomics3
EDUC 3321Foundations of Teaching: Middle and Secondary Classrooms3
EDUC 4331Instructional Strategies for Middle and Secondary Classrooms3
EDSP 4361Teaching Strategies for Adolescent Students with Learning Disabilities3
EDUC 4335 Issues of Professionalism3
EDUC 4690Clinical Teaching6
READ 3351Content Area Literacy3
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Human Geography
Economic Geography
Select one of the following:3
Child Psychology
Educational Psychology
Child Development
Total Hours45
1

Please see Academic Information section.

2

Consult with your academic advisor before selecting electives. Students who cannot prove computer literacy should take BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications.

Minor in History

Required Courses
HIST 1301United States History I3
HIST 1302United States History II3
HIST 3340 [WI] Historical Methods3
One of the following:3
World Civilizations I
World Civilizations II
Upper Level History Electives6
Total Hours18

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Sociology

Required Courses
General Education Requirements 1, 242
SOCI 1301 [shared] Introductory Sociology
SOCI 1306Social Problems3
SOCI 2303Race and Ethnic Relations3
SOCI 3330Social Science Statistics3
SOCI 4302 [WI] Methods of Social Research3
SOCI 4303 [WI] Sociological Theory3
SOCI 4399Sociology Internship/Capstone3
Field of Study Courses:
Introductory Sociology
Social Problems
Race and Ethnic Relations
This course aligns with the THECB Field of Study SOCI 2319 course
Sociology of the Family
This course aligns with the THECB Field of Study SOCI 2301 course
Total Hours60
Additional Required Courses for Concentrations
General Sociology
Advanced SOCI Electives24
Electives (3 hours must be advanced)18
Minor (6 hour must be advanced)18
Total Hours60
Pre-Ministry
Choose one of the following [shared]:
Introduction to Speech Communication
Public Speaking
Business and Professional Speaking
PSYC 2315Psychology of Adjustment3
PSYC 2314Life Span Growth & Development3
RELI 1301Survey of the Old Testament3
RELI 1302Survey of the New Testament3
RELI 3304World Religions3
RELI 3309 [WI] History of Christianity and Christian Thought to the Reformation3
COMM 3304Interpersonal Communication3
SOCI 3301Sociology of the Family3
SOCI 4304Sociology of Religion3
SOCI 4305Social Psychology3
Choose 4 from the following:12
Medical Sociology
Sociology of Aging
Social Stratification and Inequality
Gender in Society
Death and Dying
Advanced Electives or Advanced Minor Courses6
Electives or Minor Courses12
Total Hours60
Social Justice
SOCI 3320Social Stratification and Inequality3
SOCI 3368Social Movements3
SOCI 4312Gender in Society3
One of the following:3
Deviant Behavior
Sociology of Conspiracy Theories
Social Psychology
18 hours from the following - you may choose from any subject area18
Medical and Health Care Issues
Medical Sociology
Sociology of Aging
Medical and Health Care Policy
Death and Dying
Diversity Issues
Hispanics in the United States
Sociology of Sex
Migration and Society
Environmental Issues
Environmental Sociology
Water Policy
Community Issues
Sociology of the Family
Criminology
Urban Sociology
Rural Sociology
Globalization and Culture Issues
Globalization
Sociology of Superheroes
Religious Issues
Sociology of Religion
Electives12
Must complete one of the following minors (6 hours in the minor must be advanced): 318
Communications
Ethnic and Cultural Studies
Gender and Sexuality Studies
Geography
Hispanic Studies
History
Leadership Studies
Legal Studies
Marketing
Political Science
Public Health
Public Policy
Social Work
Spanish
Total Hours60

Minor in Sociology

Required Courses
SOCI Courses12
Advanced SOCI Courses6
Total Hours18

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Geography and Geographic Information Systems

Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
ENGL 1301 [shared] [WI] Composition I
ENGL 1302 [shared] [WI] Composition II
GEOG 1303 [shared] World Regional Geography
MATH 1314 [shared] College Algebra
GEOG 1320Introduction to Human Geography3
GEOL 1408 [shared] Natural Disasters
GEOG 1451 [shared] Pre-GIS: GPS, VGI and Cartography
GEOG 2451Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
GEOG 3312Economic Geography3
GEOG 3450Intermediate Geographic Information Systems 4
BCIS 3333C# Programming3
SOCI 3330Social Science Statistics3
GEOG 3352Introduction to Crime Mapping3
GEOG 4450Advanced Geographic Information Systems4
GEOG 4451Applied Remote Sensing4
ENGL 3309 [WI] Technical Writing and Document Design3
Choose three of the following9-11
Society, Natural Resources, and the Environment
Introduction to Environmental Science
Ecology for Natural Resource Managers
Geography of Latin America
Intro to Travel, Cultural Experience, & Study Abroad
Sustainability
Java Programming
Meteorology
Remote Sensing
Biogeography
Choose three of the following9
Soils, Land Use, and The Environment
Geomorphology
Environmental Sociology
Oceanography
Advanced Java Programming
Advanced C# Programming
Python Programming for Data Science
Database Theory and Practice
Structured Query Language
Electives (12 hours must be advanced)26
Total Hours120

The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences Degree in Geographic Information Systems

Required Courses
General Education Requirements42
ENGL 1301 [shared] [WI] Composition I
ENGL 1302 [shared] [WI] Composition II
Prior Learning Credit12-33
GEOG 3312Economic Geography3
BCIS 3333C# Programming3
ENGL 3309 [WI] Technical Writing and Document Design3
GEOG 3352Introduction to Crime Mapping3
GEOG 3450Intermediate Geographic Information Systems (must be taken before or concurrently with GEOG 4450)4
GEOG 4450Advanced Geographic Information Systems4
GEOG 4451Applied Remote Sensing4
BCIS 3343Advanced C# Programming3
BCIS 4301Database Theory and Practice3
BCIS 4352Structured Query Language3
Choose any advanced GEOG electives 6
Electives6-27
Total Hours120

Certificate in Geographic Information Systems

Required Courses
GEOG 2451Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
GEOG 3450Intermediate Geographic Information Systems 4
GEOG 4450Advanced Geographic Information Systems4
Choose two of the following6-8
Pre-GIS: GPS, VGI and Cartography
Remote Sensing
Applied Remote Sensing
Introduction to Crime Mapping
GIS for Natural Resource Scientists
Soils, Land Use, and The Environment
Land Surveying and Soil/Water Conservation Practices
Java Programming
Advanced Java Programming
C# Programming
Advanced C# Programming
Total Hours18

Minor in Geography

Required Courses
GEOG 1303World Regional Geography3
GEOG 1320Introduction to Human Geography3
GEOG 1451Pre-GIS: GPS, VGI and Cartography4
GEOG 2312Economic Geography3
GEOG 3300Geography of Latin America3
GEOG 3301 [WI] Intro to Travel, Cultural Experience, & Study Abroad3
Total Hours19

Geography Courses

GEOG 1303. World Regional Geography. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduction to the basic concepts of geography through a study of the major regions of the world. This course enhances the understanding of world events, lifestyles, environments, cultures, and conflicts and emphasizes thinking spatially to study human-land relationships.

GEOG 1320. Introduction to Human Geography. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an introduction to geography as a social science, emphasizing the relevance of geographic concepts to human problems.

GEOG 1451. Pre-GIS: GPS, VGI and Cartography. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

An introductory course to GIS. Pre-GIS focuses on the knowledge, instruments, and data necessary for GIS. Pre-GIS is a student-centered, hands-on course that will introduce students to the GIS concepts that are intrinsic in introductory and advanced GIS courses. Students will create virtual maps by gathering data points using GPS instruments. Students will then use GIS to create detailed information relating to their map and data points to answer questions posed in the course. Lab fee: $2.

GEOG 2301. The Geography of Texas. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course uses the key concepts of regional geography to study the evolving character and nature of the different areas of Texas. The interaction of people and environment is used to study the economic development, social and political issues, urbanization, and other changes in Texas in the past and present.

GEOG 2451. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Basic concepts of design, planning and implementation of geographic information systems. Students will learn how to create, manipulate, project, and interpret geographic information. Students are strongly encouraged to take GEOG 1451: Pre-GIS. Lab fee: $2.

GEOG 3300. Geography of Latin America. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the physical and cultural regions of Latin America. The course will examine the Spanish and Portuguese divide, indigenous, Afro, Asian, and European influence within one the world's most vibrant regions. Prerequisite: GEOG 1303, or permission of instructor.

GEOG 3301. Intro to Travel, Cultural Experience, & Study Abroad. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An introduction to travel and cultural experience, preparing students to maximize their perspective study abroad and international experiences. The course does not take students abroad, and the student does not need to be enrolled in a study abroad program to take this course.

GEOG 3312. Economic Geography. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course examines economic activity and production as a function of geographic location. It introduces the basic concepts related to the advance, spread, and distribution of economic activity around the planet and considers the forces that are reshaping the global economy, the fundamentals of spatial economics, and classical location theories.

GEOG 3352. Introduction to Crime Mapping. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 3 Hours).

The course provides conceptual knowledge and practical skills to design and implement a GIS-based analysis of community crime problems. This course constitutes an introduction to the scope and methods of crime mapping and analysis. The theory, logic, and practical applications of mapping and analysis are examined with a focus on developing a knowledge base, skills, and integration of mapping and analysis concepts that are applicable to crime detection and prevention. No prerequisites. Lab fee: $2.

GEOG 3450. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course covers intermediate topics in geographic information systems (GIS) that will allow students to succeed in the advanced GIS class Prerequisite: GEOG 2451 for GIS-BS students only Lab fee: $2.

GEOG 4084. Internship. 1-4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-4 Hours).

Directed real-world learning experience under the supervision of a practicing GIS professional. The internship assignment must be approved by an academic advisor in the Geography and GIS program prior to enrollment. The internship must be related to the student’s field of study and requires at least 240 hours of supervised work during the semester term. Student maintains a weekly log of work experience gained and, at semester-end, prepares a written report reflecting on the work experience. Student also provides to the academic advisor the employer’s evaluation of performance and maintains records of all the listed documentation. No credit will be given for previous experience or activities. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior classification and approval of department head.

GEOG 4086. Geography Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

GEOG 4385. Geography Seminar. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will consider major issues in modern geography. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: GEOG 1303, junior classification or permission of instructor.

GEOG 4450. Advanced Geographic Information Systems. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course focuses on advanced topics in geographic information systems (GIS), manipulation of raster data; advanced spatial analysis; advanced geoprocessing, and spatial modeling. Prerequisites: GEOG 3450 and for GGIS majors only: GEOG 2451 Lab fee: $2.

GEOG 4451. Applied Remote Sensing. 4 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

This course focuses on advanced topics in satellite remote sensing and digital image processing. Students will learn how to processes, interpret, classify and analyze satellite data for different applications. Lab fee: $2.

History Courses

HIST 1301. United States History I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a survey of United States history from the first European contacts through the end of the Reconstruction Period. It is designed to cover the broad sweep of United States political, cultural, social, and economic history with emphasis on those periods that have helped to shape a distinctive American character. This course with HIST 1302 will fulfill the legislative requirement of two semesters of United States history.

HIST 1302. United States History II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course continues the survey of United States history to present times. The emphasis is on the developments that contributed to the growth of modern America. This course with HIST 1301 will fulfill the legislative requirement of two semesters of United States history.

HIST 2321. World Civilizations I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of world history from prehistoric times to the beginning of the 18th century. Special attention will be given to the origins of civilization in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East and its development through the ancient, medieval, and early modern eras.

HIST 2322. World Civilizations II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of world history from the beginning of the 18th century to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on the rise and fall of Western global influence between the 18th and 20th centuries, and the numerous repercussions of this development.

HIST 3302. The Ancient World. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of the ancient Near East, Greece, the Hellenistic period, and the Roman Republic and Empire. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of the department head.

HIST 3303. Europe in the Middle Ages. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of Medieval Europe from the decline of the ancient world to the eve of the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the examination of economic and social changes underlying the formation and development of medieval civilization. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 3304. History of Texas. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of Texas from the Spanish colonial period to the present, with special attention to the Hispanic heritage, the Revolution and Republic, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the political and economic developments of the modern state. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 3305. England and Great Britain to 1603. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of English history from Roman Britain to the death of Queen Elizabeth and the end of the Tudor dynasty. Special emphasis will be in political, legal, and religious changes which formed the foundations of modern England. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or approval of department head.

HIST 3306. British History from 1603 to Modern Times. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of English and British history from 1603 to modern times. Special emphasis will be on constitutional, political, economic, and legal changes. Included as well will be a survey of the empire and the United Kingdom. Prerequisite: 6 hours HIST or approval of department head.

HIST 3309. History of Christianity and Christian Thought to the Reformation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An overview of the history of Christianity and Christian thought from founding to the beginnings of the Reformation with particular attention to major themes, movements, events, leaders, and developments within their social, cultural and political contexts. The course also offers an introduction to the central ideas and debates that have shaped the historical development of Christian theologies, practices, and institutions. Credit will not be awarded for more than one of the following courses: PHIL 3309, HIST 3309, and RELI 3309. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 3310. Colonial America. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This writing intensive course tracks the history of North America from first contact between American Indians, Europeans, and Africans to 1800. The course emphasizes research into the primary and secondary sources relevant to European-Indian relations; imperial and intertribal rivalries; the emergence of slavery and plantation societies; and the development of the Spanish, English, Dutch, and French mainland colonies. Each student will complete a rigorous original research project that examines this history. Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and 1302; 3340 as prerequisite or concurrent course, which is already an extant expectation.

HIST 3311. Creating a Nation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The United States from 1763 to 1815. The course concentrates on the causes and consequences of the American Revolution, the creation of the Constitution, the role of slavery, and the tumultuous political and social events of the young republic. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or approval of department head.

HIST 3312. A Nation Divided, 1815-1860. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

The United States from 1815 to 1860. An era shrouded in myth and legend, the early decades of the 19th century saw dramatic changes in American technology, politics, religion, economics, and society. From railroads, reforms, and religion, to political parties, Old Hickory, and the Cotton Kingdom, antebellum America was an exciting and critical time. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 3313. Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The United States from 1850 to 1877. From the infamous "Compromise of 1850" through the notorious "Compromise of 1877," this course will cover the immediate causes of disunion, the military and political battles of the Civil War, and the turbulent, controversial era of Reconstruction. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 3315. Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1929. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

The United States from 1877 to 1929. In the years following the Civil War and Reconstruction, the nation experienced dramatic economic and social changes. An era made famous by Big Business, Robber Barons, corruption, and the Roaring Twenties, this period also saw the birth of a global American Empire, the rise of Populist and Progressive reformers, and the development of conditions that would lead to the Great Depression. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 3317. U.S. Military History. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course covers the beginnings and growth of the American military tradition from the first English colonies through the new challenges of the 20th Century requiring changes and growth in the American military tradition. Important battles will be considered, especially those that illustrate tactical and technological developments. The primary emphasis of the class, however, will be on policy and strategic thought. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or department head approval; the HIST 3340 prerequisite is waived for Military Science students.

HIST 3320. The Renaissance and Reformation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A survey of European political, diplomatic, and cultural history from 1300 to 1648. The course will focus on Renaissance Humanism, the Protestant movements, the Catholic Reformation, and the emergence of the European state system during the age of religious wars. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or approval of department head.

HIST 3321. Europe in the Age of Absolutism. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A study of the European state system from the end of the Thirty Years War to the outbreak of the French Revolution. The course will concentrate on the consolidation of absolute monarchies, the rise of colonial empires, enlightened despotism, and the proliferation of Enlightenment ideas in Europe. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of Department Head.

HIST 3322. Revolutionary Europe 1789-1850. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of the forces of change in modern Europe, beginning with the rise of Liberalism in the eighteenth century and culminating with the failure of the revolutionary movements of 1848-49. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or approval of department head.

HIST 3323. Women and Gender in U.S. History. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines shifting conceptions and experiences of gender in the United States from the colonial period through the present. Topics to be covered include changing notions of masculinity and femininity; race, ethnicity, and sexual politics; the long struggle for women's rights; shifting family patterns; the media and popular culture; labor and the workplace; and the culture wars. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 3332. Latin America After Independence. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course on the history of Modern Latin America will discuss the American global hegemony, conflicts among civilizations, North and South separation, and Latin American influence in the Hispanic world. Prerequisites: 6 hours and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 3335. History of Mexico. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Mexico that includes pre-Columbian civilizations, especially the Maya and Aztec, the Spanish colonial era, and the national period. Prerequisites: 6 hours of HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission by department head.

HIST 3340. Historical Methods. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An examination of the concepts basic to all historical thinking; causation, periodization, change and continuity, the roles of social forces and individuals, and problems of interpretation, accuracy, and truth. A comparison of the social sciences and the humanities will focus on the distinctive nature of the historical discipline as it has developed since the late nineteenth century. Required of all history majors and students with teaching fields in history. Prerequisite: 12 hours of HIST or permission of department head.

HIST 4085. History Seminar. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Individual instruction in selected fields of history. The course will stress reports and wide readings in the field selected. Prerequisites: Senior classification and HIST 3340, or approval of department head. May be taken more than once for credit.

HIST 4086. History Problems. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-6 Hours).

Independent reading, research and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with a history faculty advisor. Prerequisite: HIST 3340 or permission of department head.

HIST 4300. World War II and the Holocaust. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of European history between the end of the First World War to the aftermath of World War II. Special attention will be devoted to the rise of Hitler in the early 1930s and the origins, process, and consequences of the Holocaust. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 4301. United States and the World. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A history of how world events influenced American history from 1789 to the present. The course will discuss American diplomatic and social reactions to major world occurrences. Emphasis will be on the twentieth century, particularly on the two world wars and the Cold War era. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 4303. History of the American Borderlands. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This class examines the history of the North American borderlands from the sixteenth century to the present. It takes a comparative approach, examining the history of the US-Mexico and US-Canada borderlands in relation to one another. We will address several key themes, including the establishment of formal legal regimes in the borderlands; changing notions of citizenship; immigration policies and experiences; intercultural and interracial communities and tensions; the rise of border cities as sites of tourism and ‘sin’; Texas as a border state; crime and smuggling along the borderline; representations of the border in media and popular culture; and the political and economic relationships between the United States, Mexico, and Canada. Prerequisites: HIST 1301, HIST 1302, and HIST 3340.

HIST 4305. Ideas in Action: American Social Thought from the Progressive Era to the Present. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This reading and writing intensive seminar offers students the opportunity to encounter the ideas that have been cornerstones of intellectual debate in the United States since the late 19th century. From the Pragmatists (and the progressive era) to the neoconservatives of the more recent past, ideas have been embedded within the more available world of policy, politics and major historical developments. Participants in this course will survey a wide array of intellectual debates that have been essential components of American history. HIST 4301 is recommended. Prerequisites: HIST 1301, 1302, and 3340.

HIST 4307. History Careers Outside the Classroom. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Examination of the choices available for historians who seek careers outside of classroom teaching, including museums, historic preservation, cultural resource management, archival administration, parks, oral history, corporate history, and editing and publishing. Will not count as a history course for purposes of teacher certification. Prerequisites: 6 hours of HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or with permission of department head.

HIST 4310. Recent United States History, 1929-Present. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will cover the period of American history that stretches from 1929 to the present. Discussions of the diplomatic and the domestic realms will be intertwined, illustrating how each component influenced the other. On the diplomatic side, emphasis will be placed on the rise of the United States to world power status and how the country responded to the responsibilities that accompanied that position. Domestically the course will focus on the nation finishing its transformation from a rural society to an urban one. Emphasis will be placed on the role of and attitudes toward the federal government. Considerable attention will also be directed toward the nation's continued struggle to deal with its diversity. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or approval of department head.

HIST 4311. Research in American Political History since 1929. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This writing intensive seminar offers students the opportunity to encounter vital American political history developments since 1929. All students will carry out extensive reading and research in primary and secondary resources. Those sources will have direct relevance to the research project the student pursues. Topics for the semester’s research will vary based upon instructor prerogatives. Completion of HIST 4310 is recommended. Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and 1302; HIST 3340 or permission by the instructor or department head.

HIST 4312. Social History of the United States Before 1865. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

The social, cultural, and economic development of the United States from colonial times to the end of the Civil War. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or approval of department head.

HIST 4313. Social HIstory of the United States Since 1865. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The social, cultural, and economic development of the United States since the Civil War. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or approval of department head.

HIST 4314. History of the Trans-Mississippi West. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

History of the Great West from the Lewis and Clark expedition to the 20th century. Emphasis on the West as a distinctive region in national politics, state building in the 19th century, and the development of agriculture, transportation, and commerce. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 4315. Slavery and the American South. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

From English pirates in the 1610s to King Cotton in the 1830s to the Civil War in the 1860s, this course will explore the nuances of Southern culture, politics, and economics, as well as the evolution and patterns of American slavery. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 4320. Europe 1850-1919. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An analytical survey of important developments in the political, social, economic, and cultural history of Europe between the revolutionary movements of 1848 and the first World War. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 4324. National Histories. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Each time this course is offered, it will examine the history of a particular state. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or approval of department head.

HIST 4325. European Intellectual and Cultural History. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of some of the fundamental ideas in the European intellectual tradition from the Renaissance to the contemporary age. The course focuses on the ideas and ideologies that have shaped modern European mentalities through an analysis of primary texts. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 4331. World Since 1919. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Major trends in world history following World War I, including the impact of the Great Depression, the rise of fascism, World War II and its impact, the Cold War, decolonization, and the rise and fall of the Soviet Union. Events of the latter 20th century receive special emphasis. Prerequisites: 6 hours HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission of department head.

HIST 4341. History of Sexuality in the United States. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A broad survey of topics surrounding the study of sexuality in American history. The course focuses on the changing meanings and practices of sexuality in the United States, from the colonial period to the present, but with a specific focus on American History after 1880. Prerequisites: 6 hours of HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can be taken concurrently), or permission of the department head.

HIST 4350. Special Topics in History. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of important periods, regions, and themes in history. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisites: 6 hours of HIST and HIST 3340 (this course can also be taken concurrently), or permission by department head.

HIST 4384. Practicum, Field Problem or Internship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Supervised professional activities in workplaces where historians find professional careers including museums, historic preservation, cultural resource management, archival administration, teaching, parks, oral history, corporate history, and editing and publishing. Will count as an elective but not for teacher certification or completion of the history major. Prerequisites: 6 hours of HIST, HIST 3340, and HIST 4307. May be repeated once for credit.

HIST 4390. History Capstone. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course requires students to synthesize knowledge and apply concepts and skills acquired in previous history courses. Students will identify a research question, consult relevant primary and secondary sources, analyze those sources, formulate an interpretation, and write a paper to communicate their conclusions. The topic of the Capstone will change every semester and will be determined by the instructor. Preferably, students will take this course in the last semester of their senior year. Prerequisites: HIST 3340 and senior status.

Sociology Courses

SOCI 1301. Introductory Sociology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A general introduction to the concepts and elementary methods used in the study of society. Special attention is given to social organization, social stratification, social institutions, formal organizations, small groups, and social change.

SOCI 1306. Social Problems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Application of sociological principles and theoretical perspectives to major social problems in contemporary society such as inequality, crime and violence, substance abuse, environmental issues, deviance, or family problems.

SOCI 2300. Hispanics in the United States. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The goal of the course is to introduce students to sociology while exploring Latin American societies. The course will start with a general presentation of both sociology and Latin America, followed by a discussion of what sociology is and the different ways of studying societies. The course will focus on Latin American studies and their particularities. The course will approach Latin America through the lens of politics, often from a comparative and historical perspective. Drawing on examples from various countries in Latin America, the course will examine the development of political structures, cultures, and practices in Latin America. Students will therefore be introduced to a range of important sociological issues. Relying on the historical background of different Latin American societies, students will explore sociological concepts such as race, gender, class, social violence, religion, sports, and culture. The course will examine the sociology of Latino people living in Texas and in the United States.

SOCI 2303. Race and Ethnic Relations. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course includes an analysis of relations between dominant groups and minority groups within the United States. Theories of prejudice and discrimination, the origins of the idea of race and ethnicity, the social historical foundations of the system of race and ethnic relations within the United States, systems of social stratification, and process of social change are emphasized.

SOCI 3301. Sociology of the Family. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A comparative study of the family as a social institution with emphasis on formation, functions, maintenance, child rearing, and family disorganization. Prerequisites: Junior classification and SOCI 1301 or approval of the department head.

SOCI 3304. Medical Sociology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course explores how the sociology of health and illness are affected by social structure and cultural factors, including how these influence health and illness and people's perceptions of the same. Additionally, this course explores the concrete organizations that make up medical systems and how that system reflects the interests of doctors, insurance companies, pharmaceutical industries, hospitals, researchers, the government, and the consumer. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or approval of department head.

SOCI 3305. Criminology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Theories of criminology and significant research on causes, extent, cost and ecology of crime; police, criminal, and juvenile courts; and prisons and reformatories. Course also focuses on prevention and rehabilitation. Credit for both CRIJ 3305 and SOCI 3305 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or approval of instructor.

SOCI 3306. Urban Sociology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Urban Sociology presents a detailed analysis of “the city.” In this course, students will learn about varying factors associated with urbanization, while examining local neighborhood issues. Topics include the history of urbanization; ethnography and other methods for studying urban social phenomena; theories about how cities are socially and spatially organized, how social and spatial organization are related; how urban living affects social interaction, race, class stratification, crime, and violence. Special emphasis will be placed on New Urbanism, Food Deserts, the Urban Health Penalty, and Environment (In)Justice issues. The effects of suburbanization will also be investigated.

SOCI 3307. Rural Sociology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Adaptations of families to rural environments, farming, and other occupations; organizations, agencies, and institutions serving rural people; problems in delivering services to the country; and rural development and change. Prerequisites: Junior classification and SOCI 1301 or instructor approval.

SOCI 3308. Deviant Behavior. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of the factors and conditions leading to behaviors that violate and deviate from fundamental social values. The relationship of personal and social maladjustment is addressed in relation to the various theories of deviant behavior. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301.

SOCI 3310. Sociology of Aging. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the reciprocal relationship between society and those considered aged by society, utilizing concepts and theoretical frameworks applicable to that population group. The course also examines the social forces that impinge on the aging process, including socially constructed images of the aged, and patterns of inequality of gender, race, and economics. Credit for both SOCW 3310 and SOCI 3310 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301.

SOCI 3312. Environmental Sociology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Examines relationships and interactions between society and the environment. Also examines how the natural world and its degradation influence the way societies are organized by studying human communities as part of natural ecosystems. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301.

SOCI 3315. Sociology of Sport and Leisure. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines the mechanisms through which sport and leisure institutions and practices are created, maintained, and transformed. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between sport and leisure institutions and other social systems such as the family, religion, politics, and economics. Topics considered include violence, discrimination, power, globalization, and the role of the media. This course places a strong emphasis on exploring the ways in gender, race, and class intersect with sport and leisure institutions.

SOCI 3320. Social Stratification and Inequality. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of social inequality in human society, with emphasis on the social class structure of the United States, its origins, development, and consequences for the society and the individual. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or approval of instructor.

SOCI 3330. Social Science Statistics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Surveys the application of elementary forms of statistical processes, including central tendency, variation, the normal curve and Z scores, analysis of variance, regression analysis, and correlations, to social science data. The application of statistics will be made to the following areas: social work, sociology, criminal justice, political science, and gerontology. SPSS will be utilized for data analysis.

SOCI 3338. Sociology of Superheroes. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines the ways that the idea of the superhero functions as a cultural force within society. It examines the reciprocal influence between the the idea of the superhero and ideas of morality, authority, power, gender, race, nationalism, community and other social-cultural forces.

SOCI 3368. Social Movements. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines the major theoretical ideas about how social movements are created, organized, and maintained. Particular attention will be paid towards analyzing the strategies, techniques, and tactics that have been employed by social movements and the ways in which opponents have attempted to nullify these practices.

SOCI 4085. Sociology Seminar. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Independent reading, research, discussion, and paper writing under personal direction of instructor. Prerequisite: Senior classification or approval of department head. May be taken more than once for credit if topics vary.

SOCI 4086. Problems in Sociology. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-6 Hours).

Independent reading, research and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with the sociology counselor.

SOCI 4301. Sociology of Conspiracy Theories. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines the ways that groups form conspiratorial meaning systems. The course discusses how social, cultural, and economic forces have served to shape conspiratorial thinking in the past and how these forces are working to shape these relations today and the larger social-cultural impact of such conspiratorial thinking.

SOCI 4302. Methods of Social Research. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Principles and methods of social research, including research design, methods of observation, questionnaires, interviews, and other sources of social data; qualitative and quantitative techniques of inference; analysis and research report writing. Limited research studies and projects will be undertaken by the students. Prerequisite: Junior classification, SOCI 1301, or approval of department head.

SOCI 4303. Sociological Theory. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

This course examines the major schools of sociological thought, including perspectives from both classic and contemporary sociological theory. Prerequisites: Junior classification, SOCI 1301 or approval of department head.

SOCI 4304. Sociology of Religion. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of the basic principles of religion, religious belief, and practice as a sociological concept. Attention will be given to the relationship of religion to the progress and stability of the social order. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or approval of department head.

SOCI 4305. Social Psychology. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The scientific study of the influence of society, groups, culture, and other persons on the attitudes, behavior, and experiences of the individual. An examination of the total person as he or she functions in relation to the social environment. Prerequisite: Junior classification, SOCI 1301, or approval of department head.

SOCI 4306. Water Policy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration on “water policies" -- that is, the political dimensions of human manipulation of water, wetlands and watersheds. While the substantive focus is water, the course is design to provide a broader introduction to social-scientific theorizing about human-environment relations. A central objective of the course will be examining Texas environmental laws regarding water policy; while employing a range of geographically diverse case studies that examine major topics on water politics, including: large-scale hydro-development and grassroots resistance thereto as a subset of the contentious history of international development policy more broadly the governance of common-pool resources; the emergence of participatory and community-based water management policies; the "neoliberalization" of water resources through privatization, marketization and commodification; and conflict and cooperation in the governance of trans-boundary waters. Our examination is guided analytically themes central to the environmental social sciences, including: power, institutions, political economy, and the social embeddedness of science. Credit for SOCI 4306, WSES 4306, and SOCI 5306 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301.

SOCI 4311. Sociology of Sex. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Biological, psychological, social, and cultural dimensions of human sexuality will be examined. The human sexual experience as a tool for self-awareness, understanding, and acceptance will be discussed. Topics include male and female sexual anatomy, physiology, sexuality over the life span, variations in sexual behavior, sexual dysfunctions, and related therapies. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or approval of department head.

SOCI 4312. Gender in Society. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Socialization to sex roles; male/female differences in family, work, and political behavior; male/female inequality; effects of gender in education and religion; and current changes in sex role definitions. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 and junior standing.

SOCI 4313. Globalization. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course focuses on social processes and social problems as they are contained in the highly interdependent world system. Social change and development stresses historical, comparative, and critical perspectives, and addresses the problem of how and why societies and cultures around the world change and whether those changes promote justice, equity, democracy, and development of human potential. Prerequisites: Junior standing and SOCI 1301, or department head approval.

SOCI 4314. Medical and Health Care Policy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Intensive study of current trends and issues related to professional health care practice, service delivery, and populations at risk. Provides an opportunity to explore the many ways in which issues related to health, illness, and disability policies including cultural factors impact clients, families, and society. Appropriate ways for health care professionals to understand and intervene in these areas will be discussed.

SOCI 4321. Death and Dying. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The ramifications of death, including the experiences and rights of the dying and the significance to those who mourn. Using major sociology theories, focuses on the meaning to society of the reality and symbolism of death. Credit for both SOCW 4321 and SOCI 4321 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301.

SOCI 4322. Age and Ethnic Stratification. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Studies aging as a process and life stage as affected by health, economic status, and stratification in this society and in other industrialized countries. Addresses culture, ethnicity, and race as key dimensions in understanding aging and health as delivered to diverse populations. Prerequisite: SOCI 3310.

SOCI 4340. Sociology of Contemporary Japan. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course covers a wide range of topics regarding contemporary Japanese society, such as a brief history of contemporary Japan, family, workplace, gender, economics, politics, and popular culture. This course is intended to recognize multiple dimensions of Japan which go beyond the stereotypical image of Japan. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or ANTH 2351 or approval of instructor.

SOCI 4341. Migration and Society. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The United States is a nation build on the backs of im/migrants. Millions of people leave their homelands escaping from religious/ political persecution, and/or extreme poverty with the hope of finding freedom and economic prosperity. The roles that immigrants play are very significant. Often they are praised for enriching the U.S. culture and for fueling economic growth. At the same time, they are condemned for burdening taxpayers and/or they are seen to be unwilling to assimilate in the host country. This course will address some of the key issues on international immigration to the United States. Prerequisites: SOCI 1301 or ANTH 2351 or approval of instructor.

SOCI 4399. Sociology Internship/Capstone. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Serving as a required, capstone course, students assist the faculty supervisor with their placements in a social science related agency. The field experience, coupled with textbook materials and weekly class seminars, provides students the opportunity to integrate sociological theory with practical experience. At the agency, students will work 120 hours, acquiring professional skills while earning college credit. Students will also keep a journal of internship experiences and write a final paper that applies sociology to the field experience. Prerequisites: major in sociology, senior standing, and approval of the undergraduate advisor. Field experience fee $50.

Dr. Opeyemi Zubair, Department Head
Department of History, Sociology, Geography and GIS
O.A. Grants Building, Room 354
Box T-0660
Stephenville, Texas 76402
254-968-9029
254-968-9798
zubair@tarleton.edu
www.tarleton.edu/hsgg/index.html

Ms. Jeannie Vazquez, Administrative Assistant
Department of History, Sociology, Geography and GIS
O.A. Grants Building, Room 355
Box T-0660
Stephenville 76402
254-968-9021
254-968-9798
jvazquez@tarleton.edu
www.tarleton.edu/hsgg/index.html

Professor

  • Dr. Jason LaTouche

Associate professors

  • Dr. Richard Cruz
  • Dr. Atsuko Kawakami

Assistant professors

  • Dr. Opeyemi Zubair
  • Dr. Robert Cavazos
  • Dr. Derek Lehman
  • Dr. Jensen Branscombe
  • Dr. Patrick Funiciello
  • Dr. Christopher Hickman
  • Dr. Deborah Liles
  • Dr. Paul Banda
  • Dr. Steven Peach
  • Dr. Aaron George

Visiting Assistant Professor

  • Dr. Yuen (Yolanda) Tsang

Senior Instructor

  • Mr. Ted Roberts

Instructor

  • Dr. Jahue Anderson

Adjunct instructor

  • Mr. John Martins
  • Mr. Joshua Wallace
  • Ms. Charley Henderson