College of Business

Department website: https://www.tarleton.edu/cob/

Mission Statement

The College of Business creates a dynamic learning environment for a diverse learner population with a broad range of backgrounds, perspectives, and experience, to develop the knowledge and skills needed to become productive contributors to the global business environment.

Undergraduate Degree Programs

The College of Business offers a baccalaureate program leading to the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree with majors in Accounting, Finance, General Business, Human Resources Management, International Business, Management, Management Information Systems, and Marketing. The College offers BS degrees in Applied Science (Business Administration concentration), Computer Information Systems, and Economics. The College also offers the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (BAAS) degrees in Business and in Information Technology.

The COB academic program is organized into the following departments:

Accreditation

All programs offered by the College of Business at Tarleton State University are fully accredited by AACSB and ACBSP while the entire university is regionally accredited by SACSCOC:

General Requirements of the BBA/BS/BAAS Degrees

Please consult the section on Requirements for a Baccalaureate Degree for general information on general education requirements and other requirements for Tarleton’s undergraduate degree programs. All course work within College of Business (COB) baccalaureate programs can be placed into one of four categories:

  1. University Core Requirements - Courses required of all baccalaureate degree programs throughout the university.
  2. Common Business Core - A set of courses aimed at building a common core of business knowledge in business students.  The depth of business knowledge may differ by degree type (e.g., BAAS, BBA, BS, or BSAS), and even somewhat by major.
  3. Major Specific Courses - A set of courses which build competencies unique to the discipline described by the major.
  4. Electives - A set of courses filling an interest of the student.

All courses categorized as either Common Business Core or Major Specific Courses must be passed with a C or better for them to count toward the degree, or to be used as a listed prerequisite in the baccalaureate program. In addition, learners must maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 2.00 or better for all upper-level work counted toward their degree.

BBA Common Business Core

Most of the baccalaureate degree programs are categorized as a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree. The following courses are the basis of the BBA Common Business Core (although some programs are more restrictive with their optional courses - consult individual programs for details). Each of these courses must be passed with a C or better to count toward a BBA degree and/or to serve as a prerequisite for another course within the BBA degree.

BCIS 1305Business Computer Applications3
BUSI 1301Business Principles3
Select one of the following:3-4
Plane Trigonometry
Math for Business & Social Sciences I (Finite Mathematics) 1
Math for Business & Social Sciences II (Business Calculus)
Precalculus Math 1
Calculus I 1
ACCT 2301Principles of Accounting I-Financial3
ACCT 2302Principles of Accounting II-Managerial3
BUSI 2301Business Law I3
BUSI 2305Business Statistics3
ECON 2301Principles of Macroeconomics 13
ECON 2302Principles of Microeconomics3
BUSI 3312 [WI] Business Communication3
FINC 3301Principles of Financial Management3
MGMT 3300Principles of Management3
MKTG 3312Marketing3
BCIS 4350Management Information Systems3
One of the following as determined by discipline:3
Global Information Systems
Introduction to International Business
International Economics
International Financial Management
BUSI 4359 [WI] Business Strategy3
Total Hours48-49
1

A learner who counts this course toward university general education requirements must complete an additional 3 hours of electives.

Academic Appeals Process

In accordance with Tarleton State University policy, the College of Business hereby adopts the following as its procedure for academic appeals. Each learner encountering a grievance, academic in nature, follow the procedures for filing an academic appeal found in the following policy:

Other Information

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Accounting Courses

ACCT 2301. Principles of Accounting I-Financial. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 1 Hour).

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting as prescribed by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as applied to transactions and events that affect business organizations. Students will examine the procedures and systems to accumulate, analyze, measure, and record financial transactions. Students will use recorded financial information to prepare a balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of shareholders’ equity to communicate the business entity’s results of operations and financial position to users of financial information who are external to the company. Students will study the nature of assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity while learning to use reported financial information for purposes of making decisions about the company. Students will be exposed to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). Prerequisite: MATH 1314, MATH 1332, MATH 1324, MATH 2412, MATH 2413, MATH 1342, or concurrent enrollment, or approval of department head. Lab fee: $2.

ACCT 2302. Principles of Accounting II-Managerial. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 1 Hour).

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting appropriate for all organizations. Students will study information from the entity's accounting system relevant to decisions made by internal managers, as distinguished from information relevant to users who are external to the company. The emphasis is on the identification and assignment of product costs, operational budgeting and planning, cost control, and management decision making. Topics include product costing methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301. Lab fee: $2.

ACCT 3300. Accounting Concepts. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey of basic accounting principles, concepts, and methods to include a review of general purpose financial statements and the accounting process. Financial accounting procedures are presented to support the overall managerial function. This course is provided for students without a previous accounting background. This course is designed to provide non-BBA students with sufficient introductory accounting to prepare them to survive in an introductory finance course. The coverage is not deep enough in either financial or managerial accounting for any recognized Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) program. The introductory financial accounting (ACCT 2301) and managerial accounting (ACCT 2302) courses are required for all BBA majors anyway, and would better prepare those students for further studies in Finance. Therefore, credit for both ACCT 3300 and ACCT 2301 will not be permitted by the College of Business Administration.

ACCT 3301. Business Analysis using Spreadsheets. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 1 Hour).

Theory and application of microcomputer technology in the practice of accounting and finance. Emphasis on the utilization of basic spreadsheet and general ledger software. Intended to stimulate creative initiative in performing accounting tasks and to develop the basic skills necessary to efficiently and effectively utilize the microcomputer. Credit for both BCIS 3301 and ACCT 3301 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 or ACCT 3300 Lab fee: $2.

ACCT 3302. Cost Accounting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introductory cost course, emphasizing the accounting for material, labor, and manufacturing expenses in both job order and process cost systems. Special attention to distribution of service department cost and costing of byproducts and joint products. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302 or approval of department head.

ACCT 3303. Intermediate Accounting I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The environment of accounting, development of standards, basic theory, financial statements, worksheets, and the application of generally accepted accounting principles for the business enterprise with emphasis on corporations. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 or approval of department head. Lab fee: $2.

ACCT 3304. Intermediate Accounting II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A continuation of Intermediate I with continued emphasis on generally accepted accounting principles as applied to the business enterprise. A study of the theory and application of generally accepted accounting principles. Topics include property, plant, and equipment; intangible assets; investments; current liabilities; long term liabilities; leases; stockholder's equity; and earnings per share. Prerequisite: ACCT 3303 or approval of department head. Lab fee: $2.

ACCT 3310. Accounting Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Specific study of design and implementation of complex accounting information systems. An understanding of the traditional accounting model and its relationship to each type of accounting information system will be emphasized, including accounts receivable, inventory control, cost accounting, operational budgeting, and capital budgeting. Key elements of a well-designed management control system are included. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302 or approval of department head. Lab fee $15.

ACCT 4084. Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-20 Hours).

Directed real-world learning experience under the supervision of a practicing professional accountant. The internship assignment must be approved by an accounting internship advisor prior to enrollment. The internship must be related to the student’s field of study and requires at least 320 hours of supervised work in total, including at least 160 during the semester term. Student maintains a diary of work experience gained and, at semester-end, prepares a written paper reflecting on the work experience. Student also provides to accounting internship advisor the employer’s evaluation of performance and maintains records of all the listed documentation. No credit will be given for previous experience or activities. Prerequisites: Must have completed 90 semester credit hours including a minimum of 12 semester credit hours of upper division accounting course work and have at least a 2.5 GPA overall with at least a 3.0 GPA in accounting courses.

ACCT 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

A directed study of selected problems in accounting. May be repeated with approval of department head. Prerequisites: Approval of department head.

ACCT 4090. Special Topics in Accounting. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

An examination of current topics in accounting. Readings required from current accounting publications and other related periodicals. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: 9 hours in ACCT.

ACCT 4301. Financial Accounting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a part of and a continuation of the Intermediate Accounting sequence. It extends and builds directly on what students have learned in ACCT 3303 and 3304. Topics may include: accounting for pensions; accounting for income taxes in a corporation's financial reporting; changes in accounting principles and correction of errors; preparation of statement of cash flows. This course is intended to qualify for recognition by the Texas State Board of Public Accountancy as one semester hour in accounting research and analysis (reflecting the dedication of one semester hour to research and analysis). Accordingly, this course addresses the identification, organization, and integration of diverse sources of information to reach a conclusion or make a decision; and should analyze accounting and taxation issues by reviewing information, using empirical data and analytical methods, recognizing data in patterned activities, forecasting, and integrating data. Students who successfully complete this course cannot receive credit for ACCT 5301. Prerequisite: ACCT 3304 or concurrent enrollment Lab fee: $2.

ACCT 4303. Advanced Accounting Principles. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An intensive study of theory and practices related to advanced financial accounting topics pertaining to partnerships, joint ventures, consignments, installment sales, insolvent (bankruptcy) concerns, and business combinations. Significant coverage of consolidated financial statements is provided in this course. The course covers foreign currency translation, hedge accounting and International Accounting Principles. This course includes a research component. Students who have successfully completed ACCT 4303 cannot receive credit for ACCT 5304. Prerequisite: ACCT 4301 or concurrent registration.

ACCT 4305. Federal Tax Accounting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The present income tax law and regulations; income tax legislation, treasury and court decisions, departmental rulings; income tax problems and returns, social security, and self-employment taxes. Credit for both ACCT 4305 and 5305 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: ACCT 2302 or approval of department head.

ACCT 4306. Federal Tax Accounting Advanced. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The tax consequences of doing business by corporations, partnerships, and S corporations from creation, to operating, distribution, and dissolution are discussed. Furthermore, the impact of transactions on corporations and shareholders, the partnership and its partners is emphasized throughout the course. Fiduciary relationships are also discussed. Students who have successfully completed ACCT 4306 cannot receive credit for ACCT 5306. Prerequisite: ACCT 4305 or approval of department head.

ACCT 4315. Estate and Gift Tax. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is intended to provide students with a general understanding of the fundamental principles of the United States estate and gift tax system. Students will (i) learn basic principles and concepts of estate planning, (ii) learn the theoretical basis of the U.S. approach to estate and gift taxation and (iii) gain detailed knowledge of estate and gift tax issues. In addition, the course will prepare students to anticipate, recognize, and manage various issues that arise in the transfer tax system. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302.

ACCT 4323. Ethics for Accountants. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Explores ways for an accountant to integrate ethical behavior into professional life. Includes a study of ethical behavior and decision-making. Also examines of various professional accountancy codes of conduct with an emphasis on ethical reasoning, integrity, objectivity, independence, and ethical lapses. Credit for both ACCT 4323 and ACCT 5323 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: ACCT 3304 or concurrent enrollment.

ACCT 4324. Auditing Evidence and Report. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Procedures used by auditors and accounting practitioners to gather and evaluate information and report on their findings. Includes evaluation of internal control, planning an audit or other engagement, compliance testing, substantive testing, statistical sampling, evaluation of findings, and preparation of reports. Credit for both ACCT 4324 and ACCT 5324 will not be permitted by the College of Business Administration (the topics covered in these two courses are equivalent from a Texas State Board of Public Accounting standpoint). Prerequisite: ACCT 3304 or equivalent.

ACCT 4325. Fraud Examination. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will cover the current impact of fraud in the workplace, types of fraud schemes, how to prevent fraud in the workplace; how fraud is detected and investigated, and legal aspects of fraud. Credit will not be given for both ACCT 4325 and 5325. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302 or 3300 or department head approval.

ACCT 4385. Seminar. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of current issues and developments in accounting. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

Administration Courses

ADMS 1305. Intermediate Keyboarding. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will master the alpha-numeric computer keyboard by touch, with attention to accuracy and the correct formatting of business documents such as letters, memorandums, formal reports, forms, and other business correspondence. Prerequisite: Beginning typewriting in high school or college.

Business Courses

BUSI 1000. TCC Dual Admit. 0 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

BUSI 1100. Transitioning to University Studies in Business. 1 Credit Hour (Lecture: 1 Hour, Lab: 1 Hour).

Practical study designed to prepare the student for university life, aid in the development of skills for academic success, promote personal growth and responsibility, and encourage active involvement in the learning process from an individual college perspective.

BUSI 1301. Business Principles. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Business as an integral part of society. Emphasis on ethics, social responsibility, the legal environment, and global perspectives.

BUSI 1307. Personal Finance. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Personal and family accounts, budgets and budgetary control, bank accounts, charge accounts, borrowing, investing, insurance, standards of living, renting or home ownership, and wills and trust plans.

BUSI 2301. Business Law I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the principles of law relating to law and ethics, the judicial system, constitution, tort and criminal law, law of sales, and commercial property.

BUSI 2305. Business Statistics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Descriptive and inferential statistical techniques for business and economic decision-making. Topics include the collection, description, analysis, and summarization of data; probability; discrete and continuous random variables; the binomial and normal distributions; sampling distributions; tests of hypotheses; estimation and confidence intervals; linear regression; and correlation analysis. Statistical software is used to analyze data throughout the course. Prerequisites: MATH 1324 Mathematics for Business & Social Sciences or MATH 1314 College Algebra and BCIS 1305 Business Computer Applications.

BUSI 3312. Business Communication. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A study of effective communication, both verbal and written. Provides students the opportunity to gain practice in making decisions involving selection and organization of communication content, in choosing appropriate medium for presentation of information and developing effective business writing styles.

BUSI 4084. Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-20 Hours).

Preapproved and supervised work experience in a business related position with a public or private business organization. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor and Department Head.

BUSI 4086. Business Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

A directed study of selected problems in business. May be repeated with approval of the head of the Department. Prerequisites: Approval of Instructor and Department Head.

BUSI 4090. Special Topics in Business. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

An examination of current topics in general business. Readings required from current general business publications and other related periodicals. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor and Department Head.

BUSI 4314. Administrative Office Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Principles of office management, including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling are examined. Emphasis is placed on human relations, problem solving, leadership, and improved managerial performance, office procedures, talent requirements, and equipment needs.

BUSI 4344. Introduction to International Business. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Broad coverage of key concepts and issues in international business. Emphasis on the environment of international business and the operations of the multinational firm.

BUSI 4359. Business Strategy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A capstone course involving the integration of concepts and principles studied in accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, quantitative methods, and other relevant disciplines. Includes problem solving and business decision making. Designed to be taken by senior business majors during their last semester. Prerequisite: FINC 3301, BUSI 2311, MGMT 3300, MKTG 3312; or approval of department head.

BUSI 4385. Seminar in General Business. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of selected topics dealing with problems or unique needs of business. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor and Department Head.

BUSI 4389. Global Business Practices. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of basic international business concepts, cultural literacy, and discipline specific content are then applied to practical experiences and activities related to the foreign country visited. A required study abroad at the student's expense is required. Student may complete a maximum of six hours of COBA sponsored study abroad toward degree completion. Field assignment fee of $50.

BUSI 4398. Professional Development in Applied Business. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A capstone course designed for students to synthesize the knowledge, skills, and attitude learned throughout the undergraduate applied business degree. Students will demonstrate their ability to articulate career pathways, contribute to the organizational structure of business/industry or other institutions, and examine strategies needed to make difficult decisions. Work may include individual/group research and critical reviews of existing bodies of knowledge.

Business Administration Courses

Business Analytics Courses

Business Computer Information Systems Courses

BCIS 1305. Business Computer Applications. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduces and develops foundational skills in applying essential and emerging business productivity information technology tools. The focus of this course is on business productivity software applications, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation graphics, data analytics, and business-oriented utilization of the internet.

BCIS 1315. Principles of Web Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course teaches students how to plan, design, and create professional websites using the latest industry tools. Students will gain a basic understanding of web design and will explore topics such as planning, accessibility, and operational issues surrounding web design.

BCIS 1317. Personal Computer Maintenance and Hardware. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An enhanced study of technology and hardware operation of microcomputers, their peripherals, and operating systems. Also considered are hardware configuration and selection, installation, test procedures, and maintenance.

BCIS 3300. Computer Technology and Impact. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The course explores the relationship between technology and society examining past, present, and future technologies Many topics are present including hardware and software fundamentals, the relationship between technology and society, technology and values, sociotechnical systems, and future challenges of technology and society. An emphasis is placed on businesses and the place of business in society utilizing information technologies.

BCIS 3302. Database and Data Management for Small Businesses. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Studies relational database packages. In addition, students improve their knowledge and skill with a current personal computer operating system.

BCIS 3305. Operating Systems Theory and Practice. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the history, development, and principles of computer operating systems and their variants in mainframe, minicomputer, server, and microcomputer application environments. Topics will include related software issues, programming capabilities, and job control languages. Selected operating systems representing various hardware environments will be studied.

BCIS 3315. Web Development. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Students will explore the underlying technical foundations of web design and programming. Emphasis will be placed on HTML and CSS coding as well as principles of client side scripting languages such as Javascript.

BCIS 3332. Java Programming. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A first course in the Java programming language. Covers the basic structure of Java, all standard features, data representation, and simple I/O. Students will analyze and program several representative programs.

BCIS 3333. C# Programming. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A first course in the C# programming language. Covers the basic structure of C#, all standard features, data representation, and simple I/O. Students will analyze and program several representative problems.

BCIS 3342. Advanced Java Programming. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An advanced course in the Java programming language. Covers advanced Java capabilities such as class features, error handling, graphical user interfaces, applets, and advanced object-oriented programming techniques. Students will analyze and program several representative problems. Prerequisite: BCIS 3332 or BCIS 3333 or approval of department head.

BCIS 3343. Advanced C# Programming. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Advanced programming using the C# programming language to create Windows applications in an Internet and intra-network environment. Explores object-oriented design, client-server interaction, event-driven programming, graphical user interfaces, distributed data, and distributed applications. Prerequisite: BCIS 3332 or BCIS 3333 or approval of department head.

BCIS 3347. Data Communications. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of voice and data communications technologies, concepts, and applications, including communications terminology, hardware, software, protocols, and managerial issues in data and voice communications. Topics will include alternatives available in hardware, software, and transmission facilities, design integration, selection and implementation of communications solutions. In addition, students will explore the current and future impact and direction of these technologies.

BCIS 3348. Network Architecture Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of network architecture, industry standards and communications protocols, the placement of networking devices and components, transmission media selection, logical and physical topologies, data transmission, and structured cabling for local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs). Network designs will include required components and address services as specified in an industry specific Request for Proposal (RFP). Application exercises will include preparing and presenting a design proposal in response to an RFP and installation, configuration, testing and troubleshooting of WAN/LAN wiring interface technologies. Prerequisite: BCIS 3347 or the approval of the department head.

BCIS 3389. System Analysis and Design. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A study of the systematic analysis, design, and implementation of software systems with special emphasis on the processes and skills used in the first four stages of the System Development Life Cycle. Traditional and current methodologies, including computer aided analysis and design tools will be considered. Topics will be approached through project-oriented cases and projects, which integrate theory and practical application. Prerequisite: BCIS 3332 or BCIS 3333 or approval of department head.

BCIS 4084. Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-20 Hours).

Preapproved and supervised work experience in a Computer Information Systems related position with a public or private business organization. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

BCIS 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0-0 Hours).

Selected individual topics in business on technical computer applications, practicum, field project, or other suitable computer studies. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours credit. Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and department head.

BCIS 4090. Special Topics in Computer Information Systems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0-0 Hours).

An examination of current topics in computer information systems. Readings required from current computer information systems publications and other related periodicals. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: 9 hours in BCIS.

BCIS 4301. Database Theory and Practice. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Database concepts and structures. File and data management principles underlying database construction. Fundamental types of database models, with emphasis on relational databases as well as on major non-relational forms. Practice in analysis, design, development, and optimization of working database applications on a variety of problems. Small and large system databases will be considered. Prerequisite: BCIS 3332 or BCIS 3333 or approval of department head.

BCIS 4308. Advanced Programming Language. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Develops the programming proficiency in a modern programming language. Students complete many programming assignments to achieve necessary knowledge and skills. May be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite Approval of instructor or department head. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor or department head.

BCIS 4315. Interactive and Applied Multimedia. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An exploration of multimedia tools and their relationships to various disciplines of study. A review of the principles of multimedia and the effective uses of multimedia will be conducted. The production and design of multimedia systems will culminate the course of study.

BCIS 4320. Computer Forensics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course will examine the principles and practice of conducting computer forensics investigations for both criminal and business application. Students will apply investigative methods to properly conduct a computer forensics investigation beginning with a discussion of ethics. Students will examine and use various technologies, software and procedures applicable to forensic investigation. The course will also cover the legal responsibilities and key evidentiary procedures necessary to conduct the computer forensics process. Students should have a working knowledge of hardware and operating systems to maximize their success on projects and exercises in this course. Prerequisite: Junior Standing or the approval of the instructor or department head.

BCIS 4342. Ethical Hacking & Network Defense. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduces intrusion security testing as a method for improving network defense to computer users with a solid grounding in computer and networking basics. Students will learn how to identify network security vulnerabilities by employing the techniques and software normally used by hackers to compromise networks. Students will then learn the process of determining the best practices in how to secure those vulnerabilities. Topics will include the mission and limitations of security and penetration testers along with the legal ramifications and restrictions involved. Students will be study the various methods of hackers, operating systems threats for Windows and UNIX based systems, cryptography, and modern network protection systems. Prerequisite: Junior standing or approval of instructor or department head.

BCIS 4343. Advanced Systems Analysis. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course concentrates on advanced systems analysis concepts with an emphasis in data and process decomposition and modeling. CASE tools support both the models and the interaction analysis of processes and data. The enterprise-wide view of system analysis stresses the theory behind and the generation of normalized relational database tables. Course includes material on user-centered requirements gathering and analysis. Prerequisites: BCIS 3389, and 4301 or approval of department head.

BCIS 4344. Advanced System Design and Development. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This capstone course places a strong emphasis on combining the best practices of system design, including the professional, interpersonal, and technical skills required to analyze, propose, develop, and build modern large-scale business information software systems. The student will apply information engineering principles and theory to the design and development of a complex interactive system using software engineering and data management tools. This approach will involve all the stages of the full system development life cycle, through construction and implementation. This course serves to integrate the skills of the senior CIS student. Prerequisite: BCIS 4343 or approval of the instructor or department head.

BCIS 4345. Network and Systems Security. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Studies the issues of Network and Systems Security as a continuous process involving analysis, implementation, evaluation and maintenance. Topics will include addressing computer-related risks, case analysis, and future trends. The course will provide approaches, techniques, and best practices for securing modern electronic data systems. Areas covered include electronic information and message security, database and file integrity, physical security, security management, security risk analysis, and encryption. Prerequisite: BCIS 3347 or approval of department head.

BCIS 4347. Advanced Database Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Studies the theory and practice in the analysis, design, development, implementation, and optimization of working database applications on a variety of problems focusing on topics such as database administration. Prerequisite: BCIS 4301 or approval of instructor or department head.

BCIS 4350. Management Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course investigates management issues related to business information systems designed to meet the informational needs of the various business subsystems. The concepts of systems development, security, privacy and ethics associated with information systems are stressed. Prerequisite: BCIS 1305 or department head approval.

BCIS 4352. Structured Query Language. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of SQL, including relational database schema in SQL, formulating SQL queries and sub queries of varying complexity, embedding SQL statements in a host language, defining and querying data views in SQL, and other related topics. Prerequisite: BCIS 4301 or approval of instructor or department head.

BCIS 4355. Global Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the international issues surrounding the planning, implementation, and management of global information systems. Topics covered include development and planning of offshoring programs, cultural aspects of information systems development and deployment and legal issues of global information systems. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.

BCIS 4359. Strategic Application of Information Systems. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A capstone course exploring the strategic alignment between business and information systems, the integration of information systems and other business functions to solve problems and facilitate decision making. Using case studies extensively, this course is designed to be taken by seniors during their last semester so they may demonstrate their ability to synthesize what they have learned over their course of study. Prerequisites: BCIS 3333 (or BCIS 3332), BCIS 3347, BCIS 3389, BCIS 4301, and BCIS 4350 or approval of department head.

BCIS 4376. Network Administration. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

Studies communications architectures, protocols, and interfaces as they relate to network operating systems. Topics will include communications networking techniques such as circuit switching, packet switching, broadcast networking and internetworking. Also included will be installation, configuration, client handling, basic security, and troubleshooting of a network operating system. A modern network operating system will be used to provide extensive hands-on experience in configuring and administrating a network. Prerequisite: BCIS 3347 or approval of instructor or department head Lab fee: $2.

BCIS 4378. Comprehensive Networking. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 2 Hours).

A comprehensive course requiring the student to plan, analyze, design, install, and configure a working computer network. Application exercises include the installation and configuration of a network operating system, the creation of required used interfaces, establishing network security, and establishing print services for a network. A modern network operating system will be used for extensive hands-on computer exercises to practice and demonstrate network skills. Prerequisite: BCIS 3347 or approval of instructor or department head Lab fee: $2.

BCIS 4379. The Technology of E-Business. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course examines the linkage of organizational strategy and electronic methods of delivering products, services and exchanges in inter-organizational, national, and global environments. Information technology strategy and technological solutions for enabling effective business processes within and between organizations in a global environment are considered.

BCIS 4385. Professional Development Seminar. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Professional-level enrichment for CIS majors with activities which may include participation in professional organizations, current events, research and presentations, job market analysis, interviewing and resume preparation. Prerequisite: 24 hours of BCIS/CIS courses or approval of department head.

Business Law Courses

BLAW 4084. Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-20 Hours).

Preapproved and supervised work experience in a business law related position with a public or private business organization. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

BLAW 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

A directed study of selected problems in business law. May be repeated with approval of the head of the Department. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

BLAW 4090. Special Topics in Business Law. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

An examination of current topics in business law. Readings required from current business law publications and other related periodicals. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: 9 hours in BLAW.

BLAW 4333. Business Law II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the principles of law concerning agency, employment, partnerships, corporations, bankruptcy, secured transactions, creditor/debtor rights, insurance, real and personal property, laws impacting the regulatory environment of business such as consumer protection, environment, anti-trust, and securities law.

BLAW 4334. Employment Law. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the laws relating to employment. Includes defining the employer-employee relationship; regulation of discriminatory practices in employment (Title VII, the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and other statutes); regulation of the employment environment; and testing and evaluation of employee job performance.

BLAW 4384. International Business Law. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of international commercial business and the legal environment within which it operates. The study of traditional international concepts of treaties, sovereignty, public and private laws, customs laws, licensing, franchising, environmental and employment law. Special emphasis on contracts for international sale of goods (CISG), GATT and WTO Treaties, NAFTA, regional trade areas. Credit for both BLAW 4384 and BLAW 5384 will not be awarded.

BLAW 4385. Seminar in Business Law. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of selected topics dealing with problems or unique needs of business law. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval from department head.

Economics Courses

ECON 1301. Introduction To Economics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is a survey of microeconomic and macroeconomic principles for non-business majors. In this course, students are encouraged to use their common sense to understand economic principles and applications. Microeconomic topics will include supply and demand, consumer behavior, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, international trade, and exchange rates. Macroeconomic topics will include national income, unemployment, inflation, business cycles, aggregate supply and demand, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course focuses on the aggregate or overall economy. Topics include the measurement and determination of economic aggregates such as Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycle, fiscal policy, and monetary policy. Prerequisites: MATH 1314, MATH 1332, MATH 1324, MATH 2412, MATH 2413, MATH 1342, or concurrent enrollment, or approval of department head.

ECON 2302. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Analyzes the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, and price and output decisions by firms under various market structures. Other topics include an in-depth study of resource factor markets, market failure, and international trade. Prerequisite: MATH 1314, MATH 1332, MATH 1324, MATH 2412, MATH 2413, MATH 1342, or concurrent enrollment, or approval of department head.

ECON 3301. Intermediate Macroeconomics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course extends the study of the aggregate economy introduced in Economics 2301 with emphasis on theory. Topics include the Classical and Keynesian systems, general equilibrium theories, economic growth, and public policy in a global setting. Prerequisite: ECON 2301.

ECON 3302. Intermediate Microeconomics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course represents a more advanced study of microeconomic theory than is possible in Economics 2302. Topics include consumer behavior, production and cost theory, market structure, and factor markets. Prerequisite: ECON 2302, or AGEC/AGRI 2317 or equivalent.

ECON 3303. Money And Banking. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

A study of the structure and functions of financial markets and financial intermediaries; the behavior and pattern of interest rates; the basic concepts of commercial bank management; the nature of money and the role of the Federal Reserve in its creation; the basic structure of the economy and the impact of monetary actions on this structure. Prerequisite: ECON 2301.

ECON 3304. Environmental Economics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of the economics of the natural environment. Economic tools and issues such as social cost, externalities, cost-benefit analysis, property rights, and state and federal environmental policies will be examined with emphasis on problems associated with water pollution, waste disposal, and society's burden of social costs. Prerequisite: 3 hours ECON or AGRI/AGEC 2317.

ECON 3305. Economics of Financial Markets. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the aggregate financial system and capital markets and the impact these have on financial intermediaries. Topics to be covered are: flow of funds analysis, interest rate theory, role of financial intermediaries, and management of financial assets. Credit for both FINC 3304 and ECON 3305 will not be awarded. Prerequisites: ECON 2301.

ECON 3306. Political Economy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the historical, philosophical, and theoretical relationships between the state and the economy. Credit for both POLS 3306 and ECON 3306 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: 3 hours of ECON.

ECON 4084. Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-20 Hours).

Preapproved and supervised work experience in a Economics related position with a public or private business organization. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

ECON 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

Independent reading, research and discussion. Entry into this course will be arranged with the Economics counselor. Prerequisites: Approval of department head.

ECON 4090. Special Topics in Economics. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

An examination of current topics in economics. Readings required from current economics publications and other related periodicals. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

ECON 4301. International Economics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to international economic theory and policy, the foundations of modern trade theory and its extensions, welfare effects of tariffs and non-tariff barriers, commercial policies of the United States, trade policies of developing countries, multinationals, balance of payments, and foreign exchange markets. Credit for both ECON 4301 and AGEC 4302 will not be awarded. Prerequisite: 3 hours ECON or AGEC/AGRI 2317.

ECON 4302. Developmental Economics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An introduction to theories of economic development. Much of the course focuses on the sources of economic growth, inequality, and poverty, and what “development” means beyond financial growth. Other topics include population growth, migration, human capital, agriculture, the environment, international trade and finance, and good governance. The twin concepts of market failure and government failure are seen throughout the course Prerequisite: Six hours of economics.

ECON 4311. Econometrics and Forecasting. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Econometrics is the science of using statistics to estimate economic relationships, test theories, and evaluate the impacts of government and business policies. Econometrics is also used to forecast or predict how economic variables, stock prices, and other time-varying economic indicators behave. It is used not only in economics, but in fields as diverse as finance, marketing, political science, sociology, biology, and even comparative literature. This course is data-driven as students apply what they have learned in other courses to specific, testable research questions. Credit will not be granted for both ECON 4311 and Econ 5311. Prerequisites: ECON 2301, ECON 2302, and one of the following: BUSI 2305, MATH 3311, AGEC 3317, or MATH 1342.

ECON 4320. Health Care Economics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is intended to provide important background information surrounding the health care reform debate and address a spectrum of economic and policy issues impacting the health care industry. A basic overview of the health care industry emphasizing the economic issues affecting medical care delivery and finance is provided. The demand side and the supply side of the health care market are studied with the ultimate focus on the use of the technical tools of economics to address public policy issues. Emphasis is placed on the changing nature of health care and its implications for medical and health industry. Prerequisite: ECON 1301, 2301, OR 2302.

ECON 4385. Seminar in Economics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of selected topics dealing with problems or unique needs of Economics. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval from department head.

Finance Courses

FINC 3301. Principles of Financial Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An analysis of financial decision-making at the corporate level with emphasis on the maximization of stockholder wealth. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, the valuation of stocks and bonds, cost of capital, capital budgeting, leverage and capital structure, methods of firm valuation, and financial analysis using spreadsheets. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, ACCT 2302 and ECON 2301; or ACCT 3300 and ECON 2301.

FINC 3302. Financial Intermediaries. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the internal operations of financial intermediaries with major emphasis on organization, source and allocation of funds, supervision, and regulation. Prerequisite: FINC 3301.

FINC 4084. Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-20 Hours).

Preapproved and supervised work experience in a Finance related position with a public or private business organization. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

FINC 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

A directed study of selected problems in finance. May be repeated with approval department head. Prerequisite: Approval of the department head.

FINC 4090. Special Topics in Finance. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of current topics in finance. Readings required from current finance publications and other related periodicals. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: 9 hours of FINC.

FINC 4300. Advanced Financial Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An advanced analysis of value-based management techniques with emphasis on the factors affecting the corporation's quest to maximize shareholder wealth. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, cash flow analysis, economic and market valued added, securities valuation, the cost of capital, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy, the use of leverage, working capital management, and corporate governance. Prerequisite: FINC 3301.

FINC 4301. International Financial Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Issues and questions which concern financial management of international corporations. Analysis of the financing of investment abroad and the management of assets in differing financial environments. The foreign investments decision, cost of capital and financial structure for multinational decision making, management of foreign subsidiary working capital, and financial control of multinational operations. Prerequisite: FINC 3301 or approval of department head.

FINC 4302. Real Estate Finance. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of monetary systems, primary and secondary money markets, sources of mortgage loans, federal government programs, loan applications, processes and procedures, closing costs, alternative financial instruments, equal credit opportunity acts, community reinvestment act, and state housing agency.

FINC 4303. Case Studies in Finance. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

Capstone course requires students to use fundamental concepts learned in previous finance, accounting, and economics courses to analyze real-world finance problems. Using both structured and unstructured cases, student teams analyze problems and recommend solutions. Argument is presented both orally and in writing. Cases draw from such areas as corporate finance, investments, international finance, and personal finance. Prerequisite: FINC 3301.

FINC 4304. Investments I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The development of investment policy; the character of investment risk; a comparison of investment media; description and analysis of security markets and their operations. Prerequisite: FINC 3301.

FINC 4307. Investments II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course builds on Investments I, adding new assets (e.g. derivatives), new theoretical models (e.g. option valuation), and new techniques(e.g. hedging strategies). In addition, the course will cover asset management theories and measures. Prerequisite: FINC 3301, FINC 4304.

FINC 4308. Principles of Insurance and Risk Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A survey course focusing on the theory and practice of private insurance and its economic and social significance. Major types of insurance are examined: life, health, automotive, homeowners, and liability. Various forms of risk management, characteristics of insurance contracts, government regulatory characteristics, and institutional structures are studied.

FINC 4310. Professional Financial Planning. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Applies basic financial and economic models to council individuals, families, and business to achieve financial goals. Topics include the CFP™ code of ethics, fiduciary standards, needs analysis, credit management, retirement savings, income planning and the psychology of financial planning. Prerequisite: FINC 3301.

FINC 4380. Financial Planning Capstone. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Application of financial planning tools and process. Course includes the analysis of financial statements, presentations, case analysis and professional fiduciary conduct. This course is required in order to be eligible for the CFP™. Prerequisite: 12 hours of FINC classes or department head approval.

FINC 4385. Seminar in Finance. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of selected topics dealing with problems or unique needs of Finance. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval from department head.

Human Resource Management Courses

Logistics and Supply Chain Management Courses

Management Courses

MGMT 3300. Principles of Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the basic managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling resources to accomplish organizational goals. Management theories and the business environment are also covered.

MGMT 3302. Human Resource Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Fundamental functions of human resources management; relationship between personnel management and organizations' emerging role of personnel administration in development of strategic policy for organizations.

MGMT 3304. Small Business Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A course focused on key areas to consider when establishing and/or operating a small business in today’s complex and dynamic business environment. Areas of focus may include the current state of small business and the importance of entrepreneurs in the global economy, essential management skills and entrepreneurial traits, avenues for small business ownership, the importance, role, and components of business plans and the planning process, accounting and financial considerations, marketing/customer service, and exit strategies, among other areas. Guest presentations by entrepreneurs, consultants, and other key individuals who engage with entrepreneurs may be integrated into the course, along with other popular press publications which focus on current topics and trends in small business.

MGMT 3325. Leadership. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Advanced studies of contemporary leadership issues; the history of leadership; leadership theories; leadership ethics and values; group dynamics; organizational behavior; methods of effective team building; community activism; the politics of gender, race, disability, and age; the dynamic of power; and the aspect of professional networking. Course will include in depth study of above mentioned topics, as well as extensive discussion and research of related leadership issues.

MGMT 3350. Organization Behavior. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course provides a comprehensive analysis of the behavior of people at work in all types of organizations. Topics include fundamentals of organizational behavior: values, ethics, motivation, group dynamics, individual differences, attitudes, decision-making, conflict, power, change, stress, leadership, rewarding behavior, communication, and organizational structure.

MGMT 3385. Managing Diversity in Organizations. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The course examines the changing workforce demographics, including multiple demographic groups and areas of difference important to organizational treatment and outcomes. This course examines research on treatment, access, and inclusion. Legislation related to diversity is also reviewed. This course also provides suggestions for individuals and organizations to increase opportunities and outcomes for workers of all backgrounds.

MGMT 4084. Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-20 Hours).

Preapproved and supervised work experience in a management related position with a public or private business organization. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor and Department Head.

MGMT 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

A directed study of selected problems in management. May be repeated with department head approval. Prerequisites: Approval of Instructor and Department Head.

MGMT 4090. Special Topics in Management. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

An examination of current topics in the field of management. Readings required from current management publications and other related periodicals. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

MGMT 4303. Strategic Compensation. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Wage and salary administration in public and private organizations; determinants of general wage and salary levels and structures; total compensation systems, interrelationship among employee performance, intrinsic and extrinsic rewards, perceived equitable payments, employee satisfaction. Prerequisite: MGMT 3302.

MGMT 4304. Staffing Organizations. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Recruitment and selection of human resources for organizations; optimal utilization of human resources within organizations; use of tests and other techniques in human resource management. Prerequisite: MGMT 3302.

MGMT 4305. Human Resource Development. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Practical and theoretical approaches to training and development of employees in an organization. Topics include organization, role and scope, training and development functions, philosophies, strategies, need analysis, development of program content, methods, materials and techniques, and evaluation and control of the training and development function.

MGMT 4306. Employee and Labor Relations. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Collective bargaining, labor market fundamentals, unionism, and related issues of labor economics.

MGMT 4307. Business Ethics. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours). [WI]

An analysis and examination of significant contemporary ethical issues and problems existing throughout the professional business arena. Emphasis will be upon the manager's social and environmental responsibilities to employees, customers, and the public.

MGMT 4308. Negotiation & Conflict Resolution. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is an introduction to the principles and methods of negotiation and conflict resolution that come about due to interpersonal and inter-group conflict. Explores the major theories, models, and concepts of bargaining and negotiation and introduces the topics of mediation and alternative dispute resolution.

MGMT 4312. Entrepreneurship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Addresses the process of generating ideas for new business, writing comprehensive business plans. Emphasis on information sources, industry analysis.

MGMT 4315. Project Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

This course is geared towards teaching students the fundamentals of project management based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge developed by the Project Management Institute. In particular, students will learn about scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communication and procurement management and develop a comprehensive project plan accordingly.

MGMT 4320. International Entrepreneurship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Entrepreneurship is a driver of growth, innovation, and wealth creation across developed, developing, and undeveloped nations. Increasingly, entrepreneurship is international from the founding of the venture. Entrepreneurial ventures source inputs from foreign firms and sell goods to foreign markets. Herein, we identify and address global entrepreneurial activities and evaluate the complex environment of global entrepreneurship. The course integrates theory with practical experiences in international entrepreneurship to provide students with the foundation to identify, evaluate and develop global entrepreneurial opportunities. The course is designed to prepare students for careers as founders of, early hires in, investors in, advisors to, or managers in global ventures.

MGMT 4321. Production and Operations Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Topics covered include: industrial organization, scientific management, planning and control, building locations and layouts, wage rates, corporation relationships, and research. Prerequisite: BUSI 2305 or concurrent enrollment.

MGMT 4323. Innovation and Creativity in Business. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The course explores the entrepreneurial mindset as it relates to creativity, innovation and creative problem-solving in the current business environment. Students will investigate various perspectives to ground an understanding of creativity, innovation and the uses of creative problem-solving. We will review theoretical and applied models of creativity and innovation as they relate to individuals, groups, and organizations. The materials address the creative process and its complexity as it fuels innovation in both a corporate and entrepreneurial environment though video presentations and discussions.

MGMT 4325. Trends and Issues in Entrepreneurship. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of trends, topics, and opportunities in the entrepreneurial/small business arena. The course will explore the ever-changing environment of the 21st century entrepreneur with a focus on emerging trends, current research, popular press publications and articles, and other present day resources. Identification of potential impact, implications, and/or opportunities for the current or prospective entrepreneur will be a focus. Prerequisite: N/A.

MGMT 4354. International Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A global approach to the study of management to include international dimensions of the marketplace and environment, the role of culture, international strategic management, organizational behavior and human resource management.

MGMT 4385. Seminar in Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Deals with current issues in management. Readings are required from current management publications and other related periodicals. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: 15 hours in MGMT and approval of department head.

MGMT 4389. Global Management Practices. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of basic international business concepts, cultural literacy, and discipline specific content are then applied to practical experiences and activities in the foreign country visited. A study abroad at the student's expense is required. Student may complete a maximum of six hours of COBA sponsored study abroad toward degree completion.

Marketing Courses

MKTG 2314. Marketing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Examination of the principles and concepts of marketing goods, services, and intangibles by profit and non-profit organizations in a free enterprise and global economy.

MKTG 3312. Marketing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Examination of the principles and concepts of marketing goods, services, and intangibles by profit and non-profit organizations in a free enterprise and global economy.

MKTG 3315. Personal Selling. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the role and function of personal selling as a part of the marketing mix. Techniques in identifying and locating prospective customers, approaching the prospect, presentation, and demonstrations of products and services, closing the sale, and servicing customer accounts are covered in theory and practice. Prerequisite: MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312.

MKTG 3316. Consumer Behavior. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Acquaints students with individual and group behavior of people performing in consumer role. Considers such topics as buying motives, social class, and research techniques in consumer behavior. Prerequisite: MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312.

MKTG 3317. Retailing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Fundamental operations of retailing, studying of buying practices, pricing, store locations and layout, sales promotions, personnel management, and stock control. Designed to aid the student seeking a general knowledge of the retail field as well as those specializing in Marketing. Prerequisite: MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312.

MKTG 3318. Promotional Strategy. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The study of a controlled, integrated program of promotional variables. Designed to present a company and its products to prospective customers; to promote need-satisfying attributes of products toward the end of facilitating sales and long-run performance. Prerequisite: MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312.

MKTG 4084. Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-20 Hours).

Preapproved and supervised work experience in a marketing related position with a public or private business organization. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: Either MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312, and approval of Department Head.

MKTG 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

A directed study of selected problems in marketing. May be repeated with approval of the department head. Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and Department Head.

MKTG 4090. Special Topics in Marketing. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

An examination of current topics in marketing. Readings required from current marketing publications and other related periodicals. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: 9 hours of MKTG.

MKTG 4302. Services Marketing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Introduce the student to the service environment. An in-depth analysis of the most successful service-oriented industries and firms within the world's fastest-growing economic sector will be presented. Prerequisite: MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312.

MKTG 4312. Sales Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Administration of an effective sales force, including strategy, planning, recruiting, training, motivating, coordinating, leading, and directing sales forces at all levels of marketing enterprises. Prerequisites: Either MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312, and MKTG 3315.

MKTG 4314. Supply Chain and Logistics Concepts. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Explore key business concepts, issues and decisions required for the organization and management of supply chains within the global marketplace. Supply Chain Management involves planning and coordinating the value-added activities and flow of materials, finished goods and information. Supply chain organizations participate in the product fulfillment process so that products are distributed to customers in the right quantity, time, and at the lowest cost subject to customer expectation and other service requirements. Prerequisite: MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312.

MKTG 4315. Marketing Research. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Familiarizes students with the accurate, objective, and systematic gathering, recording, and analyzing of data about problems relating to marketing goods and services. Prerequisites: Either MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312, and either BUSI 2305 or BUSI 3311.

MKTG 4316. Marketing Management. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

The application of strategic planning and management of all functional aspects of the marketing operation of an enterprise using comprehensive analytical methods and an integrated marketing mix. Prerequisites: Either MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312, and 6 hours of upper level MKTG.

MKTG 4354. International Marketing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A global approach to the study of comparative marketing systems, including economic, social, technological, governmental, and political environments as they affect international marketing operations. Prerequisite: MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312.

MKTG 4385. Seminar in Marketing. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of selected topics dealing with problems or unique needs of Marketing. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval from instructor & department head.

MKTG 4389. Global Marketing Practices. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of basic international business concepts, cultural literacy, and discipline specific content are then applied to practical experiences and activities in the foreign country visited. A study abroad at the student's expense is required. Student may complete a maximum of six hours of COBA sponsored study abroad toward degree completion. Field assignment fee of $50. Prerequisites: Either MKTG 2314 or MKTG 3312, or approval of instructor and department head.

Real Estate Courses

REST 4084. Internship. 1-6 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-20 Hours).

Preapproved and supervised work experience in a Real Estate related position with a public or private business organization. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

REST 4086. Problems. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 0 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

A directed study of selected problems in Real Estate. May be repeated with approval of the head of the Department. Prerequisite: Approval of department head.

REST 4090. Special Topics in Real Estate. 1-3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 1-3 Hours, Lab: 1-3 Hours).

An examination of current topics in real estate. Readings required from current real estate publications and other related periodicals. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: 9 hours of REST.

REST 4303. Texas Real Estate Agency Law. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of agency concepts, basic agency relationships, disclosure and duties to client, disclosure and duties to third parties, creation and termination of the agency relationship, seller agency, subagency, buyer agency, representing more than one party in a transaction, dual agency, intermediary brokerage, single agency, clarifying agency relationships, employment issues, Deceptive Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Act, selected statutes and TREC rules, ethical and legal responsibilities.

REST 4304. Principles of Real Estate I. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of licensing as a real estate broker and salesperson, distinctions between real and personal property, the real estate market, concepts of home ownership, real estate brokerage and the law of agency, fair housing laws and ethical practices, Real Estate License Act, interests in real estate, how ownership is held, legal descriptions, encumbrances and liens.

REST 4305. Principles of Real Estate II. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of licensing as a real estate broker and salesperson, ethics of practice, titles to the conveyancing of real estate, legal descriptions, law of agency, deeds, encumbrances and liens, distinctions between personal and real property, contracts, appraisal, finance and regulations, closing procedures, and real estate mathematics.

REST 4306. Texas Real Estate Contracts. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the Texas Real Estate License Act (TRELA) and the Rules of the Texas Real Estate Commission, the contract and other promulgated contracts and associated forms, obtaining a real estate loan, property descriptions, estimating seller net and buyer move-in.

REST 4307. Real Estate Law. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

Study of legal concepts of real estate, land description, real property rights and estates in land, contracts, conveyances, encumbrances, foreclosures, recording procedures, and evidence of titles.

REST 4308. Real Estate Brokerage. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of real estate brokerage office, planning and organization, operational policies and procedures, law of agency, recruiting, selection and training of personnel records and control, real estate firm analysis and expansion criteria.

REST 4309. Real Estate Appraisal. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of the central purposes and functions of an appraisal, social and economic determinant of value, appraisal of case studies, cost, market data and income approaches to value estimates, final correlations, and reporting.

REST 4385. Seminar in Real Estate. 3 Credit Hours (Lecture: 3 Hours, Lab: 0 Hours).

A study of selected topics dealing with problems or unique needs of Real Estate. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval from department head.

Dr. Rajarshi V. Aroskar, Dean
College of Business
College of Business, Room 173
1701 West Washington Street
Stephenville, Texas U.S.A. 76402
(254) 968-9350
254-968-9328
cob@tarleton.edu
www.tarleton.edu/cob

Dean

  • Aroskar, Dr. Rajarshi

Associate Dean

  • Schuessler, Dr. Joseph H.
  • Bauer, Dr. Keldon

Administrative Coordinator

  • Bise, Ms. Kristi

Accreditation Program Manager

  • Hecox, Ms. Pam

Career Development Coordinator

  • Mitchell, Ms. Kim

Instructional Designer

  • January, Mr. Scott

Budget Records Specialist

  • Holdridge, Ms. Joni

COB Graduate Program Managers

  • Moyer, Ms. Caitlin
  • Turner, Ms. Nancy

COB Academic Advisors

  • McMillian, Ms. Shelly
  • Remsza, Ms. Makayla
  • Shouse, Mr. Robert

Social Media Student Technician

  • Rodriguez, Ms. Ryanna

Event Planner & Student Technician

  • Morris, Ms. Abbey